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Wrong Trent Stewart?

Trent Stewart

Livestock Auctioneer

World Champion College of Auctioneering

HQ Phone:  (877) 654-4628

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World Champion College of Auctioneering

4900 California Ave. Tower B-210

Bakersfield, California, 93309

United States

Company Description

The World Champion College of Auctioneering is focused on the fine art of bid calling. By sharing the auction skills and knowledge of award-winning auctioneers at our school, we can help you bring your own bid calling abilities to the highest levels. Course ...more

Find other employees at this company (4)

Background Information

Affiliations

Angus Productions Inc

Representative


Education

Missouri Auction School


World Champion College of Auctioneering


Web References(32 Total References)


Goals & Results - World Champion College of Auctioneering

2007 World Champion Livestock Auctioneer: Trent Stewart


LMA InfoLink - Press

LMA's reigning world champion is Trent Stewart, Redmond, Ore. Contest rules prohibit the world champion from re-entering the contest.The current world champion is Trent Stewart, Redmond, Ore. Contest rules prohibit the world champion from re-entering the contest.The current world champion is Trent Stewart, Redmond, Ore.He won the title in June in Springfield, Mo.The current world champion is Trent Stewart, Redmond, Ore.He won the title in June in Springfield, Mo.The reigning champion is Trent Stewart, Redmond, Ore.He won the title last June in Springfield, Mo.The reigning world champion is Trent Stewart, Redmond, Ore.He won the 2007 title last June in Springfield, Mo.Trent Stewart named LMA's 2007 World Livestock Auctioneer Champion - without a prepared victory speechTrent Stewart didn't prepare a victory speech for the 2007 World Livestock Auctioneer Championship, saying he felt it would be "almost like bad karma" to do so.He may not have been prepared to speak, but he was ready for the contest.Stewart, of Redmond, Ore., was named world champion, after competition June 16 at the Springfield, Mo., Livestock Marketing Center.Trent Stewart, World Champion;Stewart, 32, was sponsored by the market he's owned since 1997, Central Oregon Livestock Auction, Inc., Madras.This was his 8th year in the contest, and he won the reserve title in 2002 and 2006.An auctioneer for 14 years, Stewart attended the Missouri Auction School in Kansas City, and the World Champion College of Auctioneering, in Bakersfield, Calif.He told the audience at the evening awards banquet that he dedicated his victory to "everybody else who's ever competed in this contest," and he pledged, "I'll try and be a great champion."The host Springfield Market awarded Stewart a custom-designed, championship diamond ring.From the Missouri Auction School, he was given the gold microphone award, and from the World Wide College of Auctioneering, the golden gavel award. The reserve world champion is Trent Stewart, Redmond, Ore.Stewart is the reigning Canadian International Livestock Auctioneer Champion.Stewart, 31, has been in the contest six times.His previous highest finish was reserve world champion in 2002.He was sponsored by Central Oregon Livestock Auction, Inc., Madras, Ore., and Superior Livestock Auction, Inc., Brush, Colo.Cash awards from LMA of $5,000 went to Macedo, $2,000 to Stewart and $1,000 to Little.Stewart and Little were awarded Waterford crystal from LMA and custom-made belt buckles by Gist Silversmiths.Stewart received a decanter and glass set, Little took home a gavel.Trent Stewart The remaining seven finalists were Tom Frey, Creston, Iowa; Al Wessel, Long Prairie, Minn.; Trent Stewart, Redmond, Ore.; Tracy Sullivan, Prague, Okla.; Kent Korte, Metropolis, Ill.; Dan Clark, Winner, S.D.; and Jim Knopp, Bosque Farms, N.M.And, Randy Searer, Sidney, Mont.; Gabe Spikes, Bowie, Texas; Trent Stewart, Redmond, Ore.; Ty Thompson, Billings, Mont.; Al Wessel, Long Prairie, Minn.Stewart, Central Oregon Livestock Auction, Inc., Madras; Sullivan, Oklahoma National Stockyards, Inc., Oklahoma City, Southern Oklahoma Livestock Auction, Ada, Woodward Livestock Auction, Inc., Woodward, Okla.; Thompson, Public Auction Yards, Billings, Mont., Billings Livestock, Northern Livestock Video, Billings, Winter Livestock, Inc. d/b/a Riverton Livestock Auction, Riverton, Wyo.; Wessel, Rich Prairie Livestock Exchange, Inc., Pierz, Minn., Tri-County Livestock Auction, Motley, Minn., Fergus Falls Livestock Auction Market, Inc., Fergus Falls, Minn., Long Prairie Livestock Auction Co., Inc.


http://www.madraspioneer.com/MAPFeatures1.shtml

Top auctioneer Trent Stewart owns Central Oregon Livestock Auction
Auctioneer Trent Stewart Auctioneer Trent Stewart Trent Stewart is a smooth talker. When he speaks, people listen, especially when he has a microphone in front of him. The 37-year-old is well known in the Northwest for his ability to speak quickly with clarity and knowledge of product as an auctioneer. Stewart is not an average auctioneer. He's so good that he was crowned World Livestock Auctioneering Champion in 2007, and in 2005, he became the International Livestock Auctioneer Champion, a competition in Canada. "If you love something, you will be good at it," Stewart said. "I've always felt that if you want to be the best at something, you have to compete against the best at the highest level. That being said, if you are the best, you will always have a job. I'm not saying I am the very best, but once that stuck in my mind, it inspired me to try and be the best, so I'd always have a job." In competitions, auctioneers conduct a live auction, and judges look for fast, clear diction with a touch of style and salesmanship. Auctioneers can only win a world title one time, an achievement that took Stewart eight years to accomplish. "It was a great honor winning those contests," said Stewart, who placed second in 2002 and 2006. "I had a tremendous amount of respect for the guys I was competing against." To win the world title, Stewart won a regional title in Texas, and then beat out 30 other contestants at the world finale held in Springfield, Mo. Each contestant endured an interview and a full day of selling cattle to real buyers. Judges then narrowed the field from 31 to 10 finalists, before naming Stewart champion. For his efforts, he won $5,000, a new Chevrolet truck for one year and a champion's sculpture, along with other prizes. "It was one of those deals when I finally won, it was kind of anticlimactic," Stewart said. "It was really cool once I won because it was one of my goals, but when I looked around and had so much respect for everyone else there, it didn't really make me feel any different. It made me feel like I was doing my job. It was just more of an accomplishment of a goal that I had set, and it was good for business." For nearly 20 years, Stewart has placed himself in front of microphones and audiences, conducting roughly 100 auctions per year. His experience of articulating bid chants, a rhythmic repetition of numbers and filler words spoken by an auctioneer, coupled with his lifelong history in the cattle industry, is what sets him apart. "You really have to know the business," Stewart said. "It's more of a game of product knowledge. In auctioneering, 60 percent is being a salesman and 40 percent is your bid chant." Like many top auctioneers, Stewart speaks quickly, and uses a smooth, monotone tempo and passion for the sale. His lips are moving so fast, that if you're not familiar with auctions, you might not understand what he's saying. "It's really actually a redundant set of numbers that you're saying over and over again," Stewart said. "It's really how you say them. You're not spitting them out any faster than anyone else, but you're saying them over and over again in a fashion that sounds fast, but is very effective." While it may be a redundant set of numbers flowing effectively from his lips, Stewart is a businessman. He has full control of a room with potential buyers, and he knows exactly what to say with his bid chant and when to say it, in order to sell cattle. "You have to know what you are selling and who you are selling it to," Stewart said. "You develop a relationship with your buyers and you have to learn how to recognize a potential bidder out there. A lot of times, I can actually recognize who will bid before they actually do it because there is a lot of body language involved." Stewart's voice is memorable, distinct and Western. Stewart not only speaks amazingly well with words, but he uses his hands to signal to buyers in the audience. Often, a buyer will signal a bid with a small hand gesture, tip of the cap or head nod. "We have professional buyers in the room that attend these auctions nearly every day of the week, so we want to create a pleasant experience for them with an auctioneer that understands the product," Stewart said. "We want them to be settled, so they can do an effective job. There are a lot of signals back and forth to communicate using body language, so you need pretty good peripheral vision to scan a room." While it may be complicated enough to produce rapid flowing bid chants as the auctioneer, Stewart said it's a like a competitive baseball game filled with strategy in any auction room to determine a final price. Buyers are working against one another and the auctioneer is working to attain a price as well. "Buyers are very competitive," Stewart said. "They work against one another to buy the very best product at the lowest price they can get, and it's my job as an auctioneer to sell them the very best product as high as I can." City to the country Stewart was raised primarily in the West hills of Portland, not exactly a birthing place for want-to-be auctioneers, but he had family in Eastern Oregon and Idaho involved with cattle ranches. He worked around cattle in the summers and developed a passion for the cattle industry. Stewart began auctioneering for Central Oregon Livestock Auction shortly after attending the Missouri Auction School in the spring of 1994. "I worked for Clay Tanler at the auction yard," said Stewart, who moved to Central Oregon in 1993. "I cleaned pens, helped in the yards and auctioned when I could for swine, sheep and small animals." Stewart eventually quit at Central Oregon Livestock Auction and worked in La Grande for Intermountain Livestock Inc., as an auctioneer and field man for almost two years, prior to attending the World Champion College of Auctioneering in Bakersfield, Calif., in 1998. "I guess I was a slow learner," Stewart said with a laugh at why he went to another auctioneering school. At the conclusion of Stewart's schooling in Bakersfield, he met with Tanler, and they decided to become partners in 2000 with Stewart buying into Central Oregon Livestock Auction. "I've had people help me along the way," said Stewart of being able to buy into a business at the age of 26. "I've been blessed with resources and good people around me to help me get to where I am today." Stewart partnered with Tanler for 10 years, before he become the sole owner of Central Oregon Livestock Auction in 2010. "For me, the cattle business is one of the industries this nation was founded on," Stewart said. "I have a great deal of respect for the men that were tough enough over the years to create the livestock business we have today." Over the course of a year, Stewart and his crew will handle 45,000-50,000 head of cattle at Central Oregon Livestock Auction. With cattle prices high, business has been abundant for Stewart. "It's the people and relationships that I've created," Stewart said of why he loves his cattle business. "We stay pretty busy," Stewart said. "Cattle are wonderful stewards of the land and if managed effectively, can be beneficial. We see a lot of ranchers and buyers on Mondays and it's a lot of fun to develop those relationships." Stewart is a busy man. He could spend one day soliciting business at cattle ranches in the Northwest, and the next he might get on an airplane to Colorado for a bull sale. "I sell a lot of pure-bred bull sales," Stewart said. "I spend my spring months doing bull sales and in the summer months I work for Superior Livestock Auction." Superior Livestock Auction is an auction via Internet and satellite feeds where buyers can purchase cattle from their living room if they want. Stewart is an auctioneer and a representative for Superior Livestock Auction. "It's the nation's largest livestock auction," Stewart said. "My grandfather always wanted to be an auctioneer, so I guess he put it in my mind at an early age," Stewart said of why he wanted to be an auctioneer.


http://www.madraspioneer.com/archives/Story.aspx/17413

Top auctioneer Trent Stewart owns Central Oregon Livestock Auction
Trent Stewart is a smooth talker. When he speaks, people listen, especially when he has a microphone in front of him. The 37-year-old is well known in the Northwest for his ability to speak quickly with clarity and knowledge of product as an auctioneer. Stewart is not an average auctioneer. He's so good that he was crowned World Livestock Auctioneering Champion in 2007, and in 2005, he became the International Livestock Auctioneer Champion, a competition in Canada. "If you love something, you will be good at it," Stewart said. "I've always felt that if you want to be the best at something, you have to compete against the best at the highest level. That being said, if you are the best, you will always have a job. I'm not saying I am the very best, but once that stuck in my mind, it inspired me to try and be the best, so I'd always have a job." In competitions, auctioneers conduct a live auction, and judges look for fast, clear diction with a touch of style and salesmanship. Auctioneers can only win a world title one time, an achievement that took Stewart eight years to accomplish. "It was a great honor winning those contests," said Stewart, who placed second in 2002 and 2006. "I had a tremendous amount of respect for the guys I was competing against." To win the world title, Stewart won a regional title in Texas, and then beat out 30 other contestants at the world finale held in Springfield, Mo. Each contestant endured an interview and a full day of selling cattle to real buyers. Judges then narrowed the field from 31 to 10 finalists, before naming Stewart champion. For his efforts, he won $5,000, a new Chevrolet truck for one year and a champion's sculpture, along with other prizes. "It was one of those deals when I finally won, it was kind of anticlimactic," Stewart said. "It was really cool once I won because it was one of my goals, but when I looked around and had so much respect for everyone else there, it didn't really make me feel any different. It made me feel like I was doing my job. It was just more of an accomplishment of a goal that I had set, and it was good for business." For nearly 20 years, Stewart has placed himself in front of microphones and audiences, conducting roughly 100 auctions per year. His experience of articulating bid chants, a rhythmic repetition of numbers and filler words spoken by an auctioneer, coupled with his lifelong history in the cattle industry, is what sets him apart. "You really have to know the business," Stewart said. "It's more of a game of product knowledge. In auctioneering, 60 percent is being a salesman and 40 percent is your bid chant." Like many top auctioneers, Stewart speaks quickly, and uses a smooth, monotone tempo and passion for the sale. His lips are moving so fast, that if you're not familiar with auctions, you might not understand what he's saying. "It's really actually a redundant set of numbers that you're saying over and over again," Stewart said. "It's really how you say them. You're not spitting them out any faster than anyone else, but you're saying them over and over again in a fashion that sounds fast, but is very effective." While it may be a redundant set of numbers flowing effectively from his lips, Stewart is a businessman. He has full control of a room with potential buyers, and he knows exactly what to say with his bid chant and when to say it, in order to sell cattle. "You have to know what you are selling and who you are selling it to," Stewart said. "You develop a relationship with your buyers and you have to learn how to recognize a potential bidder out there. A lot of times, I can actually recognize who will bid before they actually do it because there is a lot of body language involved." Stewart's voice is memorable, distinct and Western. Stewart not only speaks amazingly well with words, but he uses his hands to signal to buyers in the audience. Often, a buyer will signal a bid with a small hand gesture, tip of the cap or head nod. "We have professional buyers in the room that attend these auctions nearly every day of the week, so we want to create a pleasant experience for them with an auctioneer that understands the product," Stewart said. "We want them to be settled, so they can do an effective job. There are a lot of signals back and forth to communicate using body language, so you need pretty good peripheral vision to scan a room." While it may be complicated enough to produce rapid flowing bid chants as the auctioneer, Stewart said it's a like a competitive baseball game filled with strategy in any auction room to determine a final price. Buyers are working against one another and the auctioneer is working to attain a price as well. "Buyers are very competitive," Stewart said. "They work against one another to buy the very best product at the lowest price they can get, and it's my job as an auctioneer to sell them the very best product as high as I can." City to the country Stewart was raised primarily in the West hills of Portland, not exactly a birthing place for want-to-be auctioneers, but he had family in Eastern Oregon and Idaho involved with cattle ranches. He worked around cattle in the summers and developed a passion for the cattle industry. Stewart began auctioneering for Central Oregon Livestock Auction shortly after attending the Missouri Auction School in the spring of 1994. "I worked for Clay Tanler at the auction yard," said Stewart, who moved to Central Oregon in 1993. "I cleaned pens, helped in the yards and auctioned when I could for swine, sheep and small animals." Stewart eventually quit at Central Oregon Livestock Auction and worked in La Grande for Intermountain Livestock Inc., as an auctioneer and field man for almost two years, prior to attending the World Champion College of Auctioneering in Bakersfield, Calif., in 1998. "I guess I was a slow learner," Stewart said with a laugh at why he went to another auctioneering school. At the conclusion of Stewart's schooling in Bakersfield, he met with Tanler, and they decided to become partners in 2000 with Stewart buying into Central Oregon Livestock Auction. "I've had people help me along the way," said Stewart of being able to buy into a business at the age of 26. "I've been blessed with resources and good people around me to help me get to where I am today." Stewart partnered with Tanler for 10 years, before he become the sole owner of Central Oregon Livestock Auction in 2010. "For me, the cattle business is one of the industries this nation was founded on," Stewart said. "I have a great deal of respect for the men that were tough enough over the years to create the livestock business we have today." Over the course of a year, Stewart and his crew will handle 45,000-50,000 head of cattle at Central Oregon Livestock Auction. With cattle prices high, business has been abundant for Stewart. "It's the people and relationships that I've created," Stewart said of why he loves his cattle business. "We stay pretty busy," Stewart said. "Cattle are wonderful stewards of the land and if managed effectively, can be beneficial. We see a lot of ranchers and buyers on Mondays and it's a lot of fun to develop those relationships." Stewart is a busy man. He could spend one day soliciting business at cattle ranches in the Northwest, and the next he might get on an airplane to Colorado for a bull sale. "I sell a lot of pure-bred bull sales," Stewart said. "I spend my spring months doing bull sales and in the summer months I work for Superior Livestock Auction." Superior Livestock Auction is an auction via Internet and satellite feeds where buyers can purchase cattle from their living room if they want. Stewart is an auctioneer and a representative for Superior Livestock Auction. "It's the nation's largest livestock auction," Stewart said. "My grandfather always wanted to be an auctioneer, so I guess he put it in my mind at an early age," Stewart said of why he wanted to be an auctioneer.


http://www.shelmanfamilyhorses.com/contact.html

Auctioneer: Trent Stewart -Central Oregon Livestock Auction


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