Theresa Chinnery

last updated 3/6/2018

Theresa L. Chinnery

Clinical Neuropsychologist at ThedaCare Inc

Location:
225 Memorial Drive, Berlin, Wisconsin, United States
Company:
ThedaCare Inc
HQ Phone:
(920) 361-5535

General Information

Education

PhD

bachelor's degree - Psychology and Human Development , University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

doctorate - clinical psychology , Central Michigan University

Affiliations

Postdoctoral Fellow - Prevea Health Inc

Recent News  

http://www.wausaudailyherald.com/article/20111218/WDH0101/112180378/A-guide-dementia-Navigating-complex-disease?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7CWDH-News%7Cs

Dementia is a clinical diagnosis, says Dr. Theresa Chinnery, a clinical neuropsychologist at ThedaCare Behavioral Health.
"We oxidize," Chinnery said. But, when it really starts to impact your functioning on a daily basis is when it's more of an issue," Chinnery said. To diagnose dementia or a mild cognitive impairment, doctors use clinical neuropsychology, an applied science focusing on the clinical connection between the brain and central nervous system and cognitive and behavioral functioning. "We can correctly identify when someone has a dementia or mild cognitive impairment and we can identify when they don't, which is important, too," Chinnery said. impairment, and that's sort of, in many cases, the transition state between normal aging and a possible dementia," Chinnery said. Less than 47 percent of those diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment go on to develop dementia, Chinnery said. But "a lot of people either stay the same or get better because you can do some things (via treatment) with mild cognitive impairment." There is a distinct pattern of performance on measures of cognitive functions (neuropsychological tests) together with a comprehensive review of the clinical history and behaviors, along with a neurological examination, that makes the diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer's type accurate, Chinnery said. How accurate are the tests? Alzheimer's disease, Chinnery said, can be diagnosed with 97 percent sensitivity and 100 percent specificity. "So there's got to be other factors going on there, like the environment," Chinnery said. But, whatever is good for your heart, Chinnery said, is good for the brain. "What those meds are designed to do is prevent decline," Chinnery said. "For the most part, we have medications that can add years to functioning," Chinnery said.

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http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/article/20111103/GPG0101/111030567/

Dementia is a clinical diagnosis, said Dr. Theresa Chinnery, a clinical neuropsychologist at ThedaCare Behavioral Health.
"We oxidize," Chinnery said. But, when it really starts to impact your functioning on a daily basis is when it's more of an issue," Chinnery said. "We have normal aging that occurs and then we have mild cognitive impairment, and that's sort of, in many cases, the transition state between normal aging and a possible dementia," Chinnery said. Less than 47 percent of those diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment go on to develop dementia, Chinnery said. But "a lot of people either stay the same or get better because you can do some things (via treatment) with mild cognitive impairment." There is a distinct pattern of performance on measures of cognitive functions (neuropsychological tests) together with a comprehensive review of the clinical history and behaviors, along with a neurological examination, that makes the diagnosis of dementia of the Alzheimer's type accurate, Chinnery said. Alzheimer's disease, Chinnery said, can be diagnosed with 97 percent sensitivity and 100 percent specificity. "So there's got to be other factors going on there, like the environment," Chinnery said. But, whatever is good for your heart, Chinnery said, is good for the brain. "What those meds are designed to do is prevent decline," Chinnery said. "For the most part, we have medications that can add years to functioning," Chinnery said. Chinnery also doesn't like to use stages. After testing, she talks to patients about their patterns and strengths and what areas are more of a weakness.

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ThedaCare

Dr. ChinneryThedaCare is pleased to welcome clinical neuropsychologist Theresa L. Chinnery, PhD.A native of northeastern Wisconsin, Dr. Chinnery, has been seeing patients of all ages at ThedaCare Behavioral Health and the Alzheimer's Center of Excellence since January 2, 2007. Dr. Chinnery is a licensed psychologist whose special interests include brain injury, pervasive developmental disorders and mild cognitive impairment.She received her bachelor's degree in Psychology and Human Development from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and her doctorate in clinical psychology at Central Michigan University.She also completed an American Psychological Association accredited internship at the Illiana Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Danville, Ill., and a post-doctoral residency in Neuropsychology at the Prevea Health Neurology Department, partnered with the NeuroScience Center at St. Vincent Hospital in Green Bay. As a clinical neuropsychologist, Dr. Chinnery's expertise is in the relationship between the brain and central nervous system, and cognitive/behavioral functioning. "I enjoy using my expertise in neurocognitive functioning to help patients improve their lives and reach their full potential," Dr. Chinnery said. Dr. Chinnery can be reached at ThedaCare Behavioral Health and the Alzheimer's Center of Excellence at (920) 720-2300.

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