Stephanie Shine

Stephanie Shine

Instructor at Texas Tech University

Location:
2818 E. US Highway 290, Fredericksburg, Texas, United States
HQ Phone:
(806) 834-6998

General Information

Education

Ph.D.  - 

Recent News  

According to Stephanie Shine, Ph.D., a human development and family studies teacher at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, "There's an extremely strong sense of satisfaction in putting one's finger on a problem.When a parent says to a screaming infant, 'You're really angry,' that helps the baby go from a vague sense of misery to knowing what they're feeling, and then eventually being able to figure out what to do about it."That is, points out Shine, when a child can say "You stepped on my toe and it hurts," "That gives such a sense of power.

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"Pacifiers are a nuisance for the parent, though, when your child cries in the night and you have to find the darn thing," points out Stephanie Shine, Ph.D., a professor of the human development and family studies at Texas Tech University who focuses on issues of child security."The child has more control with the thumb, and so can be more independent in satisfying his or her own needs."During your baby's first year, but after breastfeeding is already well-established, you can relax about whether her thumb or a pacifier becomes a habit, or whether she prefers a combination of sucking and hair twirling or nose-rubbing. (Just be sure she gets to suck long enough at mealtimes: use a slow-flow nipple or allow extra time at the breast.)"It just means she hasn't come upon that particular method of handling distress," says Shine."When I thought my daughter preferred a certain toy, I would bring it to her when she was upset," she says."I'd say, ‘Look, hold onto this.I think you'll feel better.' But she didn't become attached."Once your child is older than 1 year, it's better to encourage an attachment to a lovey than to offer food or drink for comfort, Shine advises.Parents set the rules for their children in so many areas, Shine says, "at least let children decide how to handle the big love of their life, be it their thumb or a toy."Shine reports that her daughter finally gave up her blanket when she was 8, "on her own terms!"If your child is nearing age 2 and prefers his lovey to anything else, should you take action?As long as there's plenty to do in his environment, the child's natural inclination is to be curious, explore and play.If he's dragging his blankie around and still interacting with his environment, there's no need to worry.But if your child is involved with his comfort object to the exclusion of other activities, then it might be time to be concerned.

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