Ruslan Gattarov

Particularly Vocal Critic at US National Security Agency's

Company:
US National Security Agency's
Wrong Ruslan Gattarov?

Last Updated 10/25/2014

General Information

Employment History

Deputy Governor  - Chelyabinsk Oblast

Chair  - Federation Council's Commission on the Information Society Development

Affiliations

Representative  - Federation Council

Founder  - Commission on the Development of Information Society

Member of the Upper Chamber  - Russian Parliament , or Federation Council

Senator  - Russia

Member  - 29.Federation Council

Head of the Committee  - Information Society

Web References  

Russia Threatens To Block Facebook Over Drug Ads | lacotebrasserie.com

The investigation into Facebook was prompted by a complaint from Ruslan Gattarov, a senator from the ruling party, United Russia, who has recently campaigned against alleged breaches of Russians' rights by major US Internet firms.
This "has shown that there are no untouchable companiesif the law is broken, they must react, and if they don't, they can expect to be blocked," the senator told the ITAR-TASS news agency after Facebook pulled the ads. Gattarov had said earlier this week that he wanted Facebook to face a fine of several million dollars. The ads had apparently appeared on the site for some time, but authorities only acted after Gattarov formally complained, independent channel TV Rain reported. Gattarov on Thursday called for Facebook to open an office in Russia. The absence of permanent premises for the company in the country has long been a gripe for the Russian government. Gattarov, who heads the presidential council on developing Internet use, has in recent months called for the law enforcement agencies to investigate Apple and Twitter over alleged violations of users' privacy and argued that Gmail violates Russia's constitution. Gattarov has been a particularly vocal critic of the US National Security Agency's (NSA) surveillance programmes, revealed by fugitive Edward Snowden.

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Selena Gomez's Concerts In Russia Canceled, Reportedly Due To Anti-gay Laws | lacotebrasserie.com

The investigation into Facebook was prompted by a complaint from Ruslan Gattarov, a senator from the ruling party, United Russia, who has recently campaigned against alleged breaches of Russians' rights by major US Internet firms.
This "has shown that there are no untouchable companies - if the law is broken, they must react, and if they don't, they can expect to be blocked," the senator told the ITAR-TASS news agency after Facebook pulled the ads. Gattarov had said earlier this week that he wanted Facebook to face a fine of several million dollars. The ads had apparently appeared on the site for some time, but authorities only acted after Gattarov formally complained, independent channel TV Rain reported. Gattarov on Thursday called for Facebook to open an office in Russia. The absence of permanent premises for the company in the country has long been a gripe for the Russian government. Gattarov, who heads the presidential council on developing Internet use, has in recent months called for the law enforcement agencies to investigate Apple and Twitter over alleged violations of users' privacy and argued that Gmail violates Russia's constitution. Gattarov has been a particularly vocal critic of the US National Security Agency's (NSA) surveillance programmes, revealed by fugitive Edward Snowden.

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The PRISMer's Dilemma

Ruslan Gattarov, a young member of Russia's upper house of parliament in the pro-Putin "United Russia" party, announced plans to make Edward Snowden his "adviser.
Snowden's first task: to testify before a committee on cyber-security and cyber-terrorism that Gattarov chairs. Gattarov has been the Kremlin's leading advocate in the upper house for tightening state control over Russia's internet. Gattarov has also put himself in charge of raising money for Snowden, and according to the Moscow Times, Snowden's "representatives approved the idea, having noted that Snowden is running out of money." The budding partnership is an interesting one, given that Gattarov recently led the government's push against online hackers, proposing bills that would radically stiffen criminal penalties for those who disrupt government websites and servers. Last year, Gattarov introduced a bill equating hackers with terrorists and making the crime of hacking into government ministry websites equivalent to attempting the overthrow of Russia. Last year, after fans of Pussy Riot hacked into a Moscow court's website and put up a "Freedom To Pussy Riot" banner, Interfax reported Gattarov's response: "The current Criminal Code is too lenient for the hackers," Gattarov said with regret in an article in the Nezavisimaya Gazeta daily. "The law envisages only five years in prison for such offenders," he said. The senator wants to make the punishment for this crime equal to the article for the seizure of the state authorities that carries up to 15 years in prison. Gattarov stated that his initiative will be considered at a meeting of the upper house of Russian parliament at the beginning of the autumn session. He has also been pushing for state control over the Russian internet modeled on what he calls the American intelligence world's "strategy," and to do that, Gattarov has led interagency workgroups with the FSB and other state security structures. Gattarov has also played a henchman's role in crushing opposition to Putin. Last year, Gattarov helped launch the criminal case against opposition leader Alexei Navalny, officially petitioning the federal prosecutors' office to investigate Navalny after his private emails had been hacked into thanks to the FSB's version of PRISM, "SORM. Gattarov's petition to the prosecutors' office alleged that Navalny's hacked emails showed criminal wrongdoing; a month later, Navalny was criminally charged. Since Snowden arrived in Sheremyetovo airport, Gattarov has relaunched his cybersecurity committee under a different name and guise: protecting Russians' privacy and their constitutional rights. "Russian senator raises funds for Edward Snowden: United Russia politician Ruslan Gattarov says he has set up a website to gather money for the NSA whistleblower Russian senator Ruslan Gattarov has begun a campaign to raise funds for Edward Snowden, claiming that the whistleblower is running out of money. Gattarov is also seeking the whistleblower's help in investigating the security of Russians' personal data. Gattarov, a member of the ruling United Russia party, has said he will open a bank account and create a website to gather donations for the National Security Agency leaker, who was last week granted temporary asylum in Russia. Gattarov told the Izvestiya newspaper that the domain name helpsnowden.ru had been registered and volunteers from several IT companies were developing the website. Of course none of this would be possible without Snowden's agreement. And, as Snowden's supporters have been saying for weeks, he has no intention of taking money from the Russians to help them better understand American spy technology. "I have contacted [Snowden's] representatives and they have approved the idea, having noted that Snowden is running out of money," Gattarov told Interfax. Who are you going to make a fool of tomorrow - Greenwald, or Gattarov? The Times article was short on specifics, such as who Ruslan Gattarov is. In fact almost no one in the Western press has profiled Ruslan Gattarov. Now that Senator Gattarov has appointed himself as Edward Snowden's Big Brother, that question is worth exploring. Just a few years ago, Gattarov led the "Molodaya Gvardia," the militant youth wing of the pro-Kremlin United Russia party. Gattarov spent much of his time leading groups of crypto-fascist youths harassing foreigners and migrant workers - and Putin's domestic political opponents. In 2009, the Moscow News reported that Gattarov and 100 members of "Molodaya Gvardia held protests in Moscow's train stations timed to harass incoming dark-skinned passengers from impoverished Central Asian republics, many of whom come to Moscow seeking work. Gattarov and his group greeted a train arriving from Tashkent, Uzbekistan, holding signs reading "Illegals Go Home! and handing out cards with the address of the Federal Migration Service, the equivalent of the INS. Gattarov's group harassed migrant workers in train stations all across Russia. Gattarov, a protege of Putin's spindoctor Vladislav Surkov, is now a young senator, but his role hasn't changed much. In late 2011, the Kremlin party appointed Gattarov as the chief United Russia elections monitor to cover up the fraudulent vote that year, fraud that brought hundreds of thousands out in the streets. (Gattarov did everything to downplay the protests and dismiss charges of rampant voter fraud.) So the same senator Gattarov who attacked migrant workers and opposition figures, who helped get Russia's opposition leader sentenced to prison, and who has been tasked with beefing up Russia's cybersecurity to American levels, and who wants DDOS hackers charged with plotting to overthrow the government - this same Gattarov is running a "helpsnowden.ru" charity donation site, and has tasked Snowden with advising his committee on internet security, on a voluntary pro bono basis. Gattarov enjoys confrontation, and is pretty good in public debate even when grossly wrong. So last August, he went on opposition radio Ekho Moskvy to argue his case for tightening control over the Russian internet, and for waging war on hackers who mess with Russian government websites and information. Gattarov decried the culture of tolerating hackers, called for charging those who hack or disrupt Russian ministry websites with plotting to overthrow the state, and spoke about his work with other government bodies, including the FSB, to create a new state strategy for control over the Russian internet based on what he described as the US intelligence world's control over America's internet. As Gattarov told Ekho Moskvy last year... Since Snowden arrived in the Sheremyetovo transit zone, Gattarov's ad hoc committee on Russian "privacy rights" has already issued some recommendations, including requiring foreign companies operating in Russia "to comply with its law on personal data, which can require using encryption programs that are licenced by the Federal Security Service, the successor agency to the K.G.B.," according to the Times. I don't think he'll have to break any obligations or commitments to tell us what he knows," says Senator Ruslan Gattarov, head of the parliamentary commission on privacy rights.

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