Robert Inouye

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Juvenile Court Commissioner - Yakima County

Commissioner

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http://www.yakimaherald.com/news/latestlocalnews/1549694-8/yakima-countys-mental-health-court-takes-new-approach

Yakima County Court Commissioner Robert Inouye applauds as a defendant in the county's mental health court comments on being sober for a week or more following a stay in jail.
Inouye commended the man, who had been jailed for a week, for recently meeting with his mental health team and resuming his medication. Each Tuesday morning, Inouye presides over mental health court. He decided to give the man in his 30s another chance and arranged for him to get care in an inpatient facility. "Our goal isn't to throw them out," Inouye said after the hearing.

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http://www.yakimaherald.com/stories/2009/05/23/facility-offers-treatment-for-mentally-ill-youth

Robert Inouye, Yakima County's juvenile court commissioner, welcomes the option of sending certain children to Two Rivers.
There are plans to hold involuntary treatment hearings at the facility -- away from the detention facility on Jerome Avenue -- which he said will minimize disruption to children and their families. "You're dealing with a fragile population and you don't want to start any more problems than you need," Inouye said.

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http://www.kimatv.com/news/local/Yakima-County-mental-health-court-sees-progress-297467101.html

"Less law enforcement time, less jail resources, fewer commitments to mental health institutions," said Yakima County Superior Court Commissioners Honorable Robert Inouye.
"I've enjoyed the process," Commissioner Inouye said. "It's not a traditional kind of judicial job." Nor is it the traditional kind of treatment for a person accused of a crime. If the defendants don't meet the guidelines set by the mental health court, they face anything from a talk with a judge, to community service or jail time. Anyone expelled from the program will go back to sentencing. Commissioner Inouye says it took trial and error to find the right type of defendants who could be successful. "They improve their skills [and] they improve their stability," he said. "That is very rewarding." He hopes the program will get more money to expand and offer services to those accused of less serious crimes.

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