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Wrong Rich Grosz?

Rich Grosz

Resident Agent In Charge

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

HQ Phone:  (202) 208-3100

Direct Phone: (701) ***-****direct phone

Email: r***@***.gov

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

1849 C Street NW

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia, 20240

United States

Company Description

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildli...more

Find other employees at this company (8,994)

Background Information

Employment History

Special Agent

FWS


Web References(26 Total References)


Wildlife News

"I have two agents for South Dakota and two for North Dakota," said Rich Grosz, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's law enforcement agent in charge for the Dakotas.
"We don't have the resources to be in everybody's back pocket." To fill in the gaps, Grosz said, Fish and Wildlife relies on state wardens from Game, Fish and Parks for information that could lead to undercover hunts. The local wardens in turn get help from hunters themselves through the Turn In Poachers (TIPS) hot line. Undercover operations don't emerge as compliance checks, Grosz said. Before the government brings in out-of-state agents and pays thousands for a waterfowl hunt, there must be evidence of violations. "The odds are slim," that a South Dakota lodge owner has been the target of an undercover hunt, Grosz said, but "if the budget is allowing and the intelligence is there, it's certainly possible." A list of hunting operations or a licensure system that requires training for guides and lodge owners about regulations and emergency medical skills could help law enforcement by discouraging untrained hunters from taking the field, Grosz said.


http://www.towardautopia.com/?m=201109

Richard Grosz, a US Fish and Wildlife Service agent, said in a court filing that 500,000 to 1 million birds are killed annually across the United States as the result of oilfield production.
In a sworn statement, Grosz said hawks, owls, ducks and other birds mistake the waste pits for water ponds. They become fouled with oil, and their feathers lose their ability to shed water, often causing the birds to become waterlogged and drown. Birds that attempt to drink from the pits can fall in, and their steep, slippery slopes make it almost impossible for trapped wildlife to escape, he wrote.


http://www.devilslakejournal.com/articles/2009/06/10/news/news02.txt

The case was handled by Rich Grosz, a special agent with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Bismarck.


http://www.hancockwildlifechannel.org/index.php?page=12

"In his mind, when he pulled the trigger, it was a live bird," said Rich Grosz, a special agent with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Grosz said Stang was a suspect for several years, after investigators started "putting pins on the map" when looking into reports of dead raptors. "Mr. Stang was put on a back burner, but we took another look last spring," Grosz said. Grosz said it's the first time he has used a bald eagle decoy to catch a suspect. "It's an alternative approach, but we had to prove this case beyond a reasonable doubt," he said.


http://www.nj.com/newsflash/index.ssf?/base/national-110/1222448049293930.xml&storylist=topstories

> "In his mind, when he pulled the trigger, it was a live bird," said Rich Grosz, a special agent with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.Under the plea deal, Stang was sentenced to a year of probation, a fine of more than $1,000, and the loss of hunting privileges in North America for one year.


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