Maurice Wallace

Maurice O. Wallace

Associate Professor at Duke University

Location:
100 Fuqua Dr, Durham, North Carolina, United States
HQ Phone:
(919) 660-7700

General Information

Experience

Pastor  - Red Mountain Missionary Baptist Church

Education

Ph.D. degree  - Duke University

bachelor's degree  - Washington University

doctoral degree  - Duke University

Affiliations

Contributing Editor  - Manchester University Press

Member  - Yale University

Recent News  

The first, "Gender, Culture and Psychoanalysis," featured papers by Mary Helen Washington of the University of Maryland, Maurice Wallace of Duke University, and Barbara Johnson of Harvard University; Nell Irvin Painter of Princeton University moderated.
Hazel Carby, Barbara Johnson, and Maurice Wallace submitted papers for publication in the Journal of African-American History: Barbara Johnson, "Allegory and Psychoanalysis," Maurice Wallace, "Richard Wright's Black Medusa," and Hazel Carby, "African American Intellectuals Symposium: Claudia Tate." Hazel Carby, Barbara Johnson, and Maurice Wallace submitted papers for publication in the Journal of African-American History: Barbara Johnson, "Allegory and Psychoanalysis," Maurice Wallace, "Richard Wright's Black Medusa," and Hazel Carby, "African American Intellectuals Symposium: Claudia Tate." Maurice Wallace, born in 1967, read Tate's work as an undergraduate and was influenced by her books, especially Psychoanalysis and Black Novels . Johnson and Wallace's essays express their indebtedness to Tate by thinking along psychoanalytic lines, sometimes according to Tate's own lights. This remark links her paper to that of Maurice Wallace and to Jacques Lacan, a thinker who inspired them both. Maurice Wallace, an assistant professor of English at Duke University, encountered Claudia Tate as a bold and erudite writer rather than a contemporary. Like Tate, Wallace is concerned with gender and race, but while she concentrated mainly on women and femininity, he examines men and masculinity. As Freudian a thinker as Tate, Wallace sees maternal conflict as a fundamental theme in Richard Wright's work, in this instance, Native Son. Reinterpreting Lacan's mirror phase in racialized contexts, Wallace notes the importance of the gaze in Wright's fiction.

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Maurice Wallace, Duke University

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Maurice O. Wallace
Maurice O. Wallace is associate professor of English and African and African American Studies at Duke University. A 1995 Duke PhD, he has also taught at in the departments of English and African and Afro-American Studies at Yale University. He is a former member of the Yale Journal of Criticism editorial collective. Author of Constructing the Black Masculine: Identity and Ideality in African American Men's Literature and Culture, 1775-1995, he teaches African American literary and cultural theory, 19th century American literature, and gender and sexuality studies. His recent works have turned to visual culture, with particular emphases on photographic representation, and the visual technologies of race, gender, and difference.

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