Lee Dickinson

Lee V. Dickinson

Principal at Exponent Inc

Location:
149 COMMONWEALTH DRIVE, Menlo Park, California, United States
Company:
Exponent Inc
HQ Phone:
(650) 326-9400

General Information

Education

Ph.D.  - Transportation Planning and Traffic Safety , University of Maryland

Affiliations

Board Member  - National Transportation Safety Board

Recent News  

November 12, 2001 -- Disaster in the Air Jim Lehrer discusses today's American Airlines crash with Lee Dickinson, a former member of the National Transportation Safety Board and current director of Exponent Failure Analysis; Douglas Laird, former security director at Northwest Airlines and a managing partner of B.G.I. International; and Paul Czysz, a professor of aerospace engineering at St. Louis University. Lee Dickinson, a former member of the National Transportation Safety Board and the director of Exponent Failure Analysis, an engineering and investigative firm that specializes in transportation accidents, talks about the latest information. February 1, 2000 -- AlaskaAir Flight 261 Down Lee Dickinson, a former member of the National Transportation Safety Board, and the director of Exponent Failure Analysis, an engineering and investigative firm that specializes in transportation accidents, talks about yesterday's crash.

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Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E., former board member of The National Transportation Safety Board and current director of the Washington DC office of Exponent, an engineering and investigative firm that specializes in transportation accidents, talked about the latest information on Air France Concord Flight AF4590.View a transcript of the discussion Featuring Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E., of Exponent.Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E. former board member of The National Transportation Safety Board and current director of the Washington DC office of Exponent, which focuses on aviation investigation, analyzed the emerging information on the evidence of the Air France Concorde Flight AF4590, which went down near Paris, France, killing 113 people.View a web article on the crashFeaturing Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E., of Exponent."All Things Considered" (radio)Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E. former member of The National Transportation Safety Board and current director of the Washington D.C. office of Exponent, which focuses on aviation investigation; and Michael Goldfarb, former chief of staff at The Federal Aviation Administration and current chief of an aviation consulting firm; analyze the emerging information on the evidence of the crash which killed all 88 people aboard Alaska Air flight 261.Featuring Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E., of Exponent."The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer: Flight 261, The Search for Answers"Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E., a former member of the National Transportation Safety Board and current director of the Washington D.C. office of Exponent, an engineering and investigative firm that specializes in transportation accidents, talks about the latest information.View a transcript of the discussionFeaturing Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E., of Exponent. "On the Inside: How to Solve the Impossible"Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E. a former member of the National Transportation Safety Board, and current director of the Washington D.C. office of Exponent, talks about yesterday's crash.View a transcript of the discussionFeaturing Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E., of Exponent. "Modern Marvels: More Disasters"Featuring Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E., of Exponent. "Argentine Jet Crash"CNN, September 1, 1999Chat with Dr. Lee Dickinson of Exponent, a scientific consulting firm that has investigated numerous aircraft accidents.Dr. Dickinson, who is also a former NTSB board member, joined us on September 1, 1999, to discuss the Argentine jet crash and airline safety.Featuring Lee V. Dickinson, Ph.D., P.E., of Exponent.

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"We found that the G-force levels on rides do not cause injuries," said Lee Dickinson, principal engineer at Exponent Failure Analysis Associates, a consulting and research firm.Dickinson, a former member of the federal National Transportation Safety Board, said many activities from sneezing to jumping on pogo sticks can cause brief, peak G-forces greater than those from roller coaster rides. Harbaugh and Dickinson said their studies were conducted independent of the amusement park industry, although Six Flags Inc., the largest of the theme park operators, paid for it.

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