Kyunghwan Oh

Kyunghwan Ken Oh

Associate Editor at IEEE Photonics Society

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445 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, New Jersey, United States
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(732) 562-3899

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Professor  - Yonsei University

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Prof. Kyunghwan Oh, Yonsei University

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"DNA is the most abundant organic material, and it is a transparent dielectric, comparable to silica," said Dr. Kyunghwan "Ken" Oh, of the Photonic Device Physics Laboratory at Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea.
In the November 1, 2017 issue of Optical Materials Express, from The Optical Society (OSA), Dr. Oh and his colleagues lay out their method for fabricating the thin films of DNA in a way that gives them fine control over the material's optical and thermal properties. The open-access article is titled "Cationic Lipid Binding Control in DNA Based Biopolymer and Its Impacts on Optical and Thermo-Optic Properties of Thin Solid Films. As the basis for the silica glass that makes up optical fibers, silicon has long been a dominant material in inorganic photonic devices because it's readily available and easy to work with from the materials perspective. Dr. Oh argues that DNA can play the same role in organic photonic devices because it can be found throughout the living world.

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"DNA is the most abundant organic material, and it is a transparent dielectric, comparable to silica," said Kyunghwan "Ken" Oh, of the Photonic Device Physics Laboratory at Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea.
In the journal Optical Materials Express, from The Optical Society (OSA), Oh and his colleagues lay out their method for fabricating the thin films in a way that gives them fine control over the material's optical and thermal properties. Researchers have learned to control the index of refraction in organic thin films made out of DNA. Image Credit: Kyunghwan Oh, Yonsei University. In fine-tuning a method for using DNA to create thin films that could be used in photonic devices, Oh's team was able to get a range of refractive indexes four times greater than that available in silicon. Three graduate students in Oh's lab-Woohyun Jung, Hwiseok Jun and Seongjin Hong-found that by controlling the amount of water and CTMA in their mixture, they could fine-tune the refractive index of the thin film. Testing revealed different mixtures, depending on whether they added droplets of water and DNA into the CTMA solution, or water and CTMA into the DNA bath. Oh describes the strand of DNA as a rope, with sites along it to which the CTMA can bind. Oh's lab is also exploring other methods to control the optical properties of DNA. His hope is to develop a set of fundamental principles and processes that will allow manufacturers to build a wide range of optical devices, including a new generation of wearable sensors. "DNA is the most abundant organic material, and it is a transparent dielectric, comparable to silica," said Kyunghwan "Ken" Oh, of the Photonic Device Physics Laboratory at Yonsei University, Seoul, South Korea. In the journal Optical Materials Express, from The Optical Society (OSA), Oh and his colleagues lay out their method for fabricating the thin films in a way that gives them fine control over the material's optical and thermal properties. Researchers have learned to control the index of refraction in organic thin films made out of DNA. Image Credit: Kyunghwan Oh, Yonsei University. In fine-tuning a method for using DNA to create thin films that could be used in photonic devices, Oh's team was able to get a range of refractive indexes four times greater than that available in silicon. Three graduate students in Oh's lab-Woohyun Jung, Hwiseok Jun and Seongjin Hong-found that by controlling the amount of water and CTMA in their mixture, they could fine-tune the refractive index of the thin film. Testing revealed different mixtures, depending on whether they added droplets of water and DNA into the CTMA solution, or water and CTMA into the DNA bath. Oh describes the strand of DNA as a rope, with sites along it to which the CTMA can bind. Oh's lab is also exploring other methods to control the optical properties of DNA. His hope is to develop a set of fundamental principles and processes that will allow manufacturers to build a wide range of optical devices, including a new generation of wearable sensors.

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