Karen Hoffman

last updated 4/2/2018

Karen E. Hoffman

Associate Professor at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Location:
1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, Texas, United States
HQ Phone:
(713) 792-2121

General Information

Education

M. D.

M. P. H.

MDUniversity of Texas M. D.

Recent News  

Texans are no better off in one city versus another for cancer treatment | EurekAlert! Science News

"Regional Differences in Recommended Cancer Treatment for the Elderly" was co-authored by Ho, who is also a professor of economics at Rice and a professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine; Meei-Hsiang Ku-Goto, research programmer at the Baker Institute; Hui Zhao, assistant professor in MD Anderson's Department of Health Services Research; Karen Hoffman, associate professor in MD Anderson's Department of Radiation Oncology; Benjamin Smith, associate professor in MD Anderson's Department of Radiation Oncology; and Sharon Giordano, professor of medicine and chair of MD Anderson's Department of Health Services Research.

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http://paactusa.org/blog/men-with-prostate-cancer-may-not-always-get-best-advice-doctors-suggest-widely-varying-treatments-second-opinion-vital-experts-say/

"The variation of treatment of low-risk prostate cancer by physicians was striking," said lead researcher Dr. Karen Hoffman, an assistant professor at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.
Hoffman added that the doctor who diagnoses the cancer has the biggest influence on what treatment the patient will choose. "The diagnosing urologist influences a man's treatment fate. The urologist not only influences up-front treatment versus observation, but also the type of treatment," she said. Hoffman found that doctors who were older were more likely to recommend surgery or radiation rather than observation. Moreover, men were more likely to have surgery or radiation therapy if their urologist did that procedure, she added. The rate of observation as opposed to other treatments across urologists ranged from almost 5 percent to 64 percent of patients. For men diagnosed by radiation oncologists, the rate of observation also varied from 2 percent to 47 percent, Hoffman said.

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