John Tompson

John Goodwin Tompson

President at Berwick Academy

Location:
31 Academy St, South Berwick, Maine, United States
HQ Phone:
(207) 384-2164

Recent News  

Rev. John Tompson c. 1739-1828 - minister of the First Parish Church , and his "truly amiable & virtuous Consort," Sarah.
Tompson was the last Congregational pastor to serve at the Old Fields meeting house, and saw the present church built on Main Rev. Tompson Street just before his death. A founder of Berwick Academy and its third president, he is remembered for riding his white horse to Boston in 1791 to obtain the school charter signed by John Hancock. Mr. Tompson evidently plucked up his courage in accepting the call to Berwick. It was not only that he succeeded his predecessor, but the call was given in the darkest days of the Revolution, by a poor and anxious parish, with whom he frankly condoles upon its divided and languishing state. Berwick, as neighbor to her parent town of Kittery, had shared in the glorious successes of Pepperell in the siege of Louisburg; and no doubt some of her men marched with the company, formed about Saco, that was present at the fight on Bunker Hill. There is a devout assurance of Mr. Tompson's 'Requests at the throne of Grace, that the God of Peace may be with us and bless us,' as he ends his letter of acceptance. Read more about Parson Tompson. Elected a member of the Massachusetts Senate in 1800 and appointed assistant clerk of the Supreme Court, he married Rev. Tompson's daughter Sarah in 1809 and became Berwick Academy's treasurer.

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Their father, Rev. John Tompson, had been pastor of the nearby First Parish Congregational Church just before it was built in 1826.
William Allen Tompson's father, Rev. John Tompson, was minister of the First Parish Congregational Church, then located at today's Brattle Street and Old South Road. In 1825 Rev. John Tompson retired after 22 years as Berwick Academy's president, but his son-in-law, Edward Hayman of Vine Street, continued as treasurer. In 1826 Rev. John Tompson's new meetinghouse (the present First Parish Federated Church), was built near William Tompson's house.

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Rev. John Tompson c. 1739-1828 - minister of the First Parish Church , and his "truly amiable & virtuous Consort," Sarah.
Tompson was the last Congregational pastor to serve at the Old Fields meeting house, and saw the present church built on Main Rev. Tompson Street just before his death. A founder of Berwick Academy and its third president, he is remembered for riding his white horse to Boston in 1791 to obtain the school charter signed by John Hancock. Mr. Tompson evidently plucked up his courage in accepting the call to Berwick. It was not only that he succeeded his predecessor, but the call was given in the darkest days of the Revolution, by a poor and anxious parish, with whom he frankly condoles upon its divided and languishing state. Berwick, as neighbor to her parent town of Kittery, had shared in the glorious successes of Pepperell in the siege of Louisburg; and no doubt some of her men marched with the company, formed about Saco, that was present at the fight on Bunker Hill. There is a devout assurance of Mr. Tompson's 'Requests at the throne of Grace, that the God of Peace may be with us and bless us,' as he ends his letter of acceptance. Read more about Parson Tompson. Elected a member of the Massachusetts Senate in 1800 and appointed assistant clerk of the Supreme Court, he married Rev. Tompson's daughter Sarah in 1809 and became Berwick Academy's treasurer.

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