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John C. Franklin

Associate Professor of Classics

University of Vermont

HQ Phone:  (802) 847-0000

Direct Phone: (802) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Vermont

322 South Prospect Street

Burlington, Vermont, 05401

United States

Company Description

We are the tertiary referral center for Vermont, areas of New Hampshire, and upstate New York. Our patients represent the entire range of socioeconomic diversity and we serve large refugee populations from Africa, Eastern Europe, Southeast Asia, and the Balkan...more

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Background Information

Employment History

Associate Professor, Classics

kingmixers.com


Affiliations

The Detroit Greek and Latin Educational Foundation

Board of Advisors Member


Vermont Farm Bureau Inc

Board of Trustees Member


Education

M.A.

Classics

University of Washington


Web References(29 Total References)


Detroit Greek and Latin

John C. Franklin
University of Vermont Associate Professor of Classics


Kinyras-The Appendix

By John Franklin and Glynnis Fawkes - Published July 16, 2013
Sing to us of the king, Clio-that musical king and divine lyre-who ruled Cyprus with wealth and song; who died when he lost to Apollo in a musical throwdown. Sing to us of Kinyras! Glynnis Fawkes and John C. Franklin, pictures and words for "Kinyras," one of this issue's selections for our Not-So-Funny Pages section, met on the island of Cyprus. Both were studying the classical and archaeological Greek world, but each did so from their distinctive creative foundations: Fawkes was an artist, and Franklin a musician. Bronze Age sparks flew, and they got together with plans of collaborating on ancient music videos. The music videos haven't happened yet, though they did get married and have two kids. A veteran of ten years of archaeological excavations in the eastern Mediterranean, Fawkes now draws witty comics, works as an archaeological illustrator, and paints. Franklin is an Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Vermont, an expert on ancient Greek and Near Eastern music, and a composer of scores in the style of ancient Greek music. For this comic, Franklin came up with the script, and Glynnis contributed the art and lettering, adapting and re-imagining scenes to dramatize the text. **John Franklin** is a Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Vermont.


http://www.detroitgreekandlatin.com/board.htm

John C. Franklin
University of Vermont Associate Professor of Classics


AAUP Leaders and Other Academics Decry Human Rights Abuses & Mass Dismissals in Turkey | AAUP CBC

John C. Franklin, Associate Professor of Classics, University of Vermont


rlpaulproductions.com » Podcasts

Part of the series "Culture of Greece: The Past if Present," produced for ArtsEdge at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Though Socrates and Plato died 2,500 years ago there is, of course still a country called Greece. And many modern Greek musicians will tell you that their art is influenced by the ideas of the ancients. Join us as we explore whether or not this is true. Two modern Greek musicians and scholars of ancient Greece talk about the twisting road Greek culture has taken to bring us to the music of Greece today. The podcast is narrated by John Franklin, professor in the Department of Classics at the University of Vermont.
Part of the series "Culture of Greece: The Past if Present," produced for ArtsEdge at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Though the ancient Greek culture was destroyed thousands of years ago, Greek ideas continue to influence us today. That's particularly true in music. Join John Franklin, professor in the Department of Classics at the University of Vermont to hear the impact that the ancient Greeks had on the creation and development of Opera, Classical music and Jazz. Part of the series "Culture of Greece: The Past if Present," produced for ArtsEdge at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. There are only a handful of pieces of music remaining from ancient Greece. And we do mean pieces; tiny scraps of papyrus and bits of stone with musical notes that are thousands of years old. Come with John Franklin, professor in the Department of Classics at the University of Vermont to meet the people who bring this ancient music back from the dead. Learn how they come to understand the slashes and squiggles that they see and translate them into music. And find out what they do when they learn that he music they're playing was torn in half a thousand years ago and the other half is gone forever.


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