Joan Murray

last updated 4/1/2017

Joan Murray

Board Member at Palatine Historical Society

Location:
224 E. Palatine Road, Palatine, Illinois, United States
HQ Phone:
(847) 991-6460

Recent News  

George Henry Clayson | Palatine Historical Society

Then along came a big discovery by Joan Murray, a genealogist and member of our Board of Directors, in the Arlington Heights Library.
In a book on early Phoenix, Arizona burials, she found George Clayson's name. In a trip to Arizona, Joan found this was indeed our George and through diligent searching and months of work she discovered much more about him. It seems that he did not move very far away at first. In 1877, the Claysons moved to Nunda Township in McHenry County, which is now Crystal Lake. There he owned another fruit farm, this one of 107 acres. He had 3500 cherry trees, 1000 grapevines, and 10 acres of raspberries. Two years later he built a clover and fruit dryer. He was now growing cucumbers, corn, sugar cane, and clover in his fields and hired many workers. He opened the Crystal Lake Pickling and Preserving Company. It seems he was a tireless business man. Clayson Dryer Factory The Nunda newspaper, published weekly, with ads and details about the lives of its residents was where Joan found this information and a lot more. He was on a committee to raise funds for the building of a new school. He was a teacher and superintendent of Sunday School. He built two more dryers in other towns and another pickling factory in Union. He was on the town's first school board. His dryer burnt down and a new one was built in two weeks. He had evergreen trees stolen from his nursery; he was hit by a tackle block and injured; his horses ran away with him and he was dragged on the ground and his wife badly hurt after being thrown from her buggy. Joan Murray searched the cemetery for Clayson's grave and that of his son Frank who died a year later of alcoholism, but none was found. The Historical Society is grateful to Joan Murray and Marg Plank for gathering all these details (and more) for preservation at the Clayson House Museum.

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George Henry Clayson | Palatine Historical Society

Then along came a big discovery by Joan Murray, a genealogist and member of our Board of Directors, in the Arlington Heights Library.
In a book on early Phoenix, Arizona burials, she found George Clayson's name. In a trip to Arizona, Joan found this was indeed our George and through diligent searching and months of work she discovered much more about him. It seems that he did not move very far away at first. In 1877, the Claysons moved to Nunda Township in McHenry County, which is now Crystal Lake. There he owned another fruit farm, this one of 107 acres. He had 3500 cherry trees, 1000 grapevines, and 10 acres of raspberries. Two years later he built a clover and fruit dryer. He was now growing cucumbers, corn, sugar cane, and clover in his fields and hired many workers. He opened the Crystal Lake Pickling and Preserving Company. It seems he was a tireless business man. Clayson Dryer Factory The Nunda newspaper, published weekly, with ads and details about the lives of its residents was where Joan found this information and a lot more. He was on a committee to raise funds for the building of a new school. He was a teacher and superintendent of Sunday School. He built two more dryers in other towns and another pickling factory in Union. He was on the town's first school board. His dryer burnt down and a new one was built in two weeks. He had evergreen trees stolen from his nursery; he was hit by a tackle block and injured; his horses ran away with him and he was dragged on the ground and his wife badly hurt after being thrown from her buggy. Joan Murray searched the cemetery for Clayson's grave and that of his son Frank who died a year later of alcoholism, but none was found. The Historical Society is grateful to Joan Murray and Marg Plank for gathering all these details (and more) for preservation at the Clayson House Museum.

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George Ela | Palatine Historical Society

Joan Murray.
1995-10-22. Daily Herald.

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