Irene Jacobs

last updated 10/24/2017

Irene Jacobs

BU Safety and Environment Manager at The Coca-Cola Company

Location:
1 Coca Cola Plz, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
HQ Phone:
(404) 676-2121

Recent News  

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/article/soft-drink-giant-improves-in-house-water-stewardship-2012-10-12

"For TCCC, greater water-use efficiency does not mean making less beverage," says Coca-Cola South Africa (CCSA) environment occupational safety and health manager Irene Jacobs.
She adds that the Coca-Cola network in South Africa - which includes bottling partners Amalgamated Beverage Industries (ABI), Coca-Cola Fortune, Coca-Cola Shanduka Beverages and the Peninsula Beverages Company - has achieved a 14% improvement on the amount of water used for every litre of beverage produced, compared with a 2004 baseline. Meanwhile, CCSA has been assessing the vulnerabilities of the quality and quantity of water sources for each of its bottling plants in the country, says Jacobs, adding that, by the end of the year, the company will have plans to implement a locally relevant water resource sustainability programme at each of its bottling operations responsible for the manufacturing and distribution of Coca-Cola products. "As part of this process, our bottling plants have formed water teams that meet regularly to highlight internal and external water risks, including risks identified through source vulnerability assessments, as well as ways of dealing with them. These teams also engage with external stakeholders," says Jacobs. "Water is a finite resource that will always be important to our company as we are a hydration business. We actively work to manage water resources and share our expertise with other businesses, government and local communities," says Jacobs. She points out that, among the many challenges Coca-Cola is trying to mitigate worldwide, is the significant number of people currently lacking access to safe water - an estimated 1.3-billion - and a general lack of basic sanitation worldwide, which claims the lives of more than 1.6-million children a year. Jacobs also lists pollution, population growth, poor waste disposal, poor water management policies and climate change as some of the issues that need to be tackled through public- private partnerships. She explains that Coca-Cola's 2020 Vision serves as the framework for the company's roadmap, guiding every aspect of its business by outlining what needs to be accomplished to achieve sustainable, high-quality growth. TCCC focuses on eight core areas integral to its business sustainability, with goals and metrics for the company and its system of bottling partners worldwide. From an environmental perspective, the focus areas include sustainable agriculture, water stewardship, sustainable packaging and recycling, as well as energy management and climate protection. "Coca-Cola's bottling partners are essential to these sustainability efforts. Together, the company and its bottling partners work to minimise the system's impact on the planet and invest in making a positive difference in the communities we serve," says Jacobs. She cites ABI's bottling plant in Phoenix, KwaZulu-Natal, which won a recognition award at the Department of Water Affairs' Water Conservation & Water Demand Management Sector Awards 2012, as an example of CCSA's commitment to sustainability. Jacobs adds that TCCC's global water stewardship goals include becoming the best- in-class at water management, striving for efficient water use and working on understanding and safeguarding the water sources on which it relies. "We are also forming water partnerships to address sustainability challenges and provide rural communities with sanitation infrastructure and access to safe drinking water. These partnerships include businesses, governments, nongovernmental organisations, civic organisations and community members," she says. "We also encourage regular maintenance to identify and fix leaks at the plants, and we hold training programmes to increase water awareness and improve competence in water-resource management," says Jacobs. Further reduction initiatives employed by Coca-Cola include the use of membrane technology, as well as the return and reuse of different reusable effluent streams. "We also use electrochemically activated water as an alternative to a cleaning-in-place (CIP) process, which reduces CIP time and costs, as well as the water, chemicals and energy use," says Jacobs. "In addition to reducing our water-use ratio and recycling wastewater, by 2020, we aim to replenish the same amount of water used in our finished products," she says, adding that, by 2011, TCCC's global system had already replenished 35% of water used during production. Irene Jacobs IRENE JACOBS As part of The Coca-Cola Company's 2020 goal of replenishing the same amount of water used in finished products, Coca-Cola South Africa has achieved a 14% improvement on the amount of beverage used for every litre of beverage produced, compared to a 2004 baseline IRENE JACOBS As part of The Coca-Cola Company's 2020 goal of replenishing the same amount of water used in finished products, Coca-Cola South Africa has achieved a 14% improvement on the amount of beverage used for every litre of beverage produced, compared to a 2004 baseline

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