Glenn Eagleston

Glenn T. Eagleston

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Glenn T. Eagleston - 1 of 11 images
Ninth Air Force top ranked ace with 18.5 victories, Lt. Col. Glenn T. Eagleston would command the 353rd FS from October 26, 1944 to May 31, 1945. He was born in Utah on March 12, 1921, and joined the Army Air Corps as an enlisted man in 1940. He became an aviation cadet in 1942, graduating at Luke Field in September. After a brief stint with the 20th Fighter Group, he was transferred to the 354th and moved with that Group to England in October 1943. Eagleston was to fly the F-86 Sabre in the Korean War with the 4th FIW and credited with two Mig kills.

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Glenn Eagleston
Glenn Eagleston Glenn Eagleston was such a pilot, flying Mustangs in WWII and F-86 Sabre jets in Korea. He was born in Utah on March 12, 1921 , and joined the US Army Air Corps as an enlisted man in 1940. He became an aviation cadet in 1942, graduating at Luke Field in September. After a brief stint with the 20th Fighter Group, he transferred to the 354th and moved with that Group to England in October 1943. Among the outstanding pilots of the 354th that winter were Glenn Eagleston and Jim Howard. Flying at 23,000 feet, Eagleston caught an Fw 190 with a short burst, at 45 degrees of deflection. The e/a dove away steeply and Eagleston pursued. Both planes accelerated rapidly; the the German went into a violent, unrecoverable spin. Crashing into the ground, the Focke Wulf became Eagleston's first victory - which he might not even have hit with his machine gun fire. On the Kiel mission of Jan. 5, the Group claimed 18 enemy aircraft. Eagleston flew escort missions regularly that winter, and his score climbed: an ME-110 on Jan. 30, single ME-110's on both Feb. 21 and 22, and a Bf-109 on March 6, making him an ace. Mustang Aces of the 9th and 15th AF The 354th resumed its original tactical role in Spring 1944, in preparation for D-Day. In mid-June, the Group moved to Cricqueville, an advanced base in Normandy and simultaneously returned to the Ninth Air Force command. By this time Eagleston had 8½ kills and had been promoted to Captain. Finishing his first combat, he was out of action for the summer. He returned to active duty in the fall; his biggest day was October 29, when he destroyed three Messerschmitts in a half hour dogfight.

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Glenn Eagleston
Aces who have mastered the challenges of combat flying in two different wars, those who have succeeded in both piston and jet engine aircraft, deserve special mention in the pantheon of great aviators. Glenn Eagleston was such a pilot, flying Mustangs in WWII and F-86 Sabre jets in Korea. He was born in Utah on March 12, 1921, and joined the Army Air Corps as an enlisted man in 1940. He became an aviation cadet in 1942, graduating at Luke Field in September. After a brief stint with the 20th Fighter Group, he transferred to the 354th and moved with that Group to England in October 1943. Among the outstanding pilots of the 354th that winter were Glenn Eagleston and Jim Howard. Flying at 23,000 feet, Eagleston caught an Fw 190 with a short burst, at 45 degrees of deflection. The e/a dove away steeply and Eagleston pursued. Both planes accelerated rapidly; the the German went into a violent, unrecoverable spin. Crashing into the ground, the Focke Wulf became Eagleston's first victory - which he might not even have hit with his machine gun fire. On the Kiel mission of Jan. 5, the Group claimed 18 enemy aircraft. Eagleston flew escort missions regularly that winter, and his score climbed: an ME-110 on Jan. 30, single ME-110's on both Feb. 21 and 22, and a Bf-109 on March 6, making him an ace. Mustang Aces of the 9th and 15th AF The 354th resumed its original tactical role in Spring 1944, in preparation for D-Day. n mid-June, the Group moved to Criqueville, an advanced base in Normandy and simultaneously returned to the Ninth Air Force command. By this time Eagleston had 8.5 kills and had been promoted to Captain. Finishing his first combat, he was out of action for the summer. He returned to active duty in the fall; his biggest day was October 29, when he destroyed three Messerschmitts in a half hour dogfight.

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