Frank Aarestrup

Frank Møller Aarestrup

Professor at Danish Technical University

Location:
Anker Engelunds Vej 1, Lyngby, North Denmark, Denmark
HQ Phone:
+45 45 25 25 25

General Information

Experience

Professor, Research Manager - Technical University of Denmark

Education

PhD

PhDNational Veterinary Serum Laboratory

Affiliations

Member - ILSI Europe

Recent News  

Resistance to last-resort antibiotic has now spread across globe | New Scientist

After their announcement, Frank Aarestrup of the Danish Technical University in Lyngby immediately searched for the sequence in a Danish database of bacterial DNA sampled from people, animals and food.
He found it in one person who had a blood infection earlier this year, and in five bacterial samples from poultry meat imported from Germany between 2012 and 2014. The poultry could have been raised outside Germany, says Aarestrup - he doesn't know its origin. But ominously, all the bacteria also carried genes conferring resistance to many other antibiotics, including penicillin and cephalosporins. "We do not now know where in the world it originated" The genes found in Denmark and China are the same, says Aarestrup, suggesting mcr-1 has travelled, rather than arising independently in each place.

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antibiotic resistance

Initial research by Frank Aarestrup of the Danish Veterinary Laboratory found evidence of widespread glycopeptide resistance on farms where avoparcin was used and was heavily relied on in justification for the Danish and German bans.
In July 1996, the EU's SCAN considered the scientific foundation for the German and Danish bans. its members wanted hard evidence for a natural and sustainable transfer of resistance from livestock to humans, but did not get it. Their report said that Aarestrup had obtained contradictory results in later studies-and that, in any event, he found only small numbers of resistant bacteria which were unable to grow without assistance.

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What are my opportunities to combat the post-antibiotic era? | ttopstart - Subsidies & funding consulting, strategy and innovation

After their announcement, Frank Aarestrup of the Danish Technical University in Lyngby immediately searched for the sequence in a Danish database of bacterial DNA sampled from people, animals and food.
He found it in one person who had a blood infection earlier this year, and in five bacterial samples from poultry meat imported from Germany between 2012 and 2014.

Read More

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