Elias Johnson

Elias Johnson

Mathematical Statistician at U.S. Energy Information Administration

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Location:
1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C., District of Columbia, United States
HQ Phone:
(202) 586-8800

General Information

Experience

Energy Analyst  - U.S. Department of Energy

Affiliations

Analyst  - EIA

Recent News  

EIA analyst Elias Johnson recently told Reuters that it's possible "the U.S. will become more of a primary player in the global coal trade market."
U.S. Energy Information Administration analyst Elias Johnson said the U.S. coal industry may now be better positioned to meet foreign demand because U.S. miners have learned to produce at lower cost, after coming through a series of recent bankruptcies. "There's the possibility that the U.S. will become more of a primary player in the global coal trade market," he said. But he added there are also plenty of reasons the spike in demand could be temporary. For one thing, U.S. coal production and transportation costs are much higher than for other producers such as Indonesia and Australia. Because coal can often be transhipped from European ports before it is consumed, it is also hard to determine where shipments ultimately end up. Johnson pointed out that some of the fuel shipped into Western Europe, for example, could be making its way to other places like Ukraine, which is having trouble securing coal from its separatist-held regions.

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U.S. Energy Information Administration analyst Elias Johnson said the U.S. coal industry may now be better positioned to meet foreign demand because U.S. miners have learned to produce at lower cost, after coming through a series of recent bankruptcies.
"There's the possibility that the U.S. will become more of a primary player in the global coal trade market," he said. But he added there are also plenty of reasons the spike in demand could be temporary. For one thing, U.S. coal production and transportation costs are much higher than for other producers such as Indonesia and Australia. Because coal can often be transhipped from European ports before it is consumed, it is also hard to determine where shipments ultimately end up. Johnson pointed out that some of the fuel shipped into Western Europe, for example, could be making its way to other places like Ukraine, which is having trouble securing coal from its separatist-held regions.

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So that will make coal a little bit more competitive and we're expecting to see that lead to increases in production in 2017," Elias Johnson, a coal analyst with the EIA, said.

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