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Wrong Duane Graveline?

Duane Edgar Graveline

Scientist

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

HQ Phone:  (281) 483-0000

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

2101 NASA Pkwy

Houston, Texas, 77058

United States

Company Description

Established in 1959, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is the US government agency responsible for the civilian space program as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. Since that time, most U.S. space exploration efforts have been l...more

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Background Information

Employment History

The Cholesterol Truth


Web References(106 Total References)


http://www.1to1vitamins.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=258:trends-in-prescription-drug-use-in-the-usa&catid=8&Itemid=114

You should read: Lipitor: Thief of Memory by Dr. Duane Graveline, a NASA physician.


http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-090616a-obituary-duane-graveline-astronaut.html

Duane 'Doc' Graveline, scientist-astronaut who resigned from NASA, dies at 85
Duane Graveline, as seen in June 1965 at the announcement of his selection as one of NASA's first six scientist-astronauts. - Duane Graveline, a medical doctor who was among NASA's first scientist-astronauts, but who resigned after just six months for "personal reasons," died on Monday (Sept. 5). He was 85. Graveline, who went by the nickname "Doc," died following a short illness at a hospital near his home in Merritt Island, Florida, according to a source close to his family. Named in June 1965 as a member of NASA's fourth group of astronauts, Graveline joined five other scientists - Owen Garriott, Ed Gibson, Joe Kerwin, Curt Michel and Harrison Schmitt - as the space agency's first trainees recruited for their academic backgrounds, rather than flight experience. But Graveline had only reported for supersonic jet training, before he was out of the astronaut corps. "Duane Graveline, one of the nation's scientist-astronauts, is the first to resign before making a space flight," reported the Associated Press in an article published on August 18, 1965. "[NASA] announced that Dr. Graveline had resigned for personal reasons. It said [Graveline] would remain with the Manned Spacecraft Center [Johnson Space Center] as a medical doctor." NASA portrait of scientist-astronaut Duane E. Graveline. Graveline, who remained silent on the motivations behind his former wife's actions, understood NASA's decision. "I had no problem with NASA's reaction," stated Graveline, as quoted by authors David Shayler and Colin Burgess in "NASA's Scientists-Astronauts. Duane E. Graveline at the June 1965 press conference announcing his selection as a scientist-astronaut. Three months after leaving the astronaut corps, Graveline resigned from NASA and opened a family medical practice in Burlington, Vermont. 'Sputnik started it for me' Born on March 2, 1931, Duane Edgar Graveline earned a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Vermont in June 1951 and his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Vermont College of Medicine in June 1955. Graveline then entered the U.S. Air Force Medical Service and interned at Walter Reed Army Hospital from July 1955 through June 1956. In February 1957, he was granted the aeronautical rating of flight surgeon. Eight months later, as he worked toward a Master's degree in public health at Johns Hopkins, Graveline was inspired by the launch of the world's first artificial satellite. "All things are supposed to have a beginning, and I guess Sputnik started it for me," recalled Graveline, as quoted by Shayler and Burgess. U.S. Air Force portrait of Duane E. Graveline. In July 1960, after completing his residency, Graveline was assigned to the Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, as a research scientist with special interest in prolonged weightlessness deconditioning and countermeasures. "Using both bed rest and water immersion, I explored the use of various countermeasures to prevent zero-g [gravity] deconditioning including ... extremity tourniquets and lower body negative pressure device, the prototype of which was conceived by me," Graveline wrote on spacedoc.com, his website. "The LBNP device was flown on Skylab, Mir and shuttle flights and remains in current use." Graveline continued his research and directed an analysis team on Soviet bioastronautics at Brooks Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, beginning in July 1962. "I broke out the unique Soviet telemetry link for continuous monitoring of cosmonaut heart and respiratory rates used during their entire Vostok and Voskhod series," described Graveline. "On one memorable afternoon while on the Pacific Ocean- located tracking ship Rose Knot Victor, the NASA tracking system [was] able to follow the biomedical progress of the Soviet's Voskhod 2 mission," he recalled, referencing the March 1965 flight that included the world's first spacewalk by cosmonaut Alexei Leonov. Graveline also worked as an early NASA flight controller. In the years that followed his November 1965 resignation, Graveline briefly returned to NASA to support the first four space shuttle missions as director of medical operations at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. After a six-month leave, he returned to his practice in Vermont, where he continued to work until his retirement from clinical medicine in 1994 at the age of 63. A prolific author, Graveline wrote 15 books, including two memoirs about his time with the space program, a number of science fiction novels and three books about his medical research into statin drugs. He was also the author of 15 professional publications and reports on weightlessness countermeasures and biological deconditioning. Graveline had four daughters with his first wife, Carole.


The Great Cholesterol Con

- Duane Graveline, M.D., MPH.
Former astronaut, NASA physician, author of Lipitor: Thief of Memory and Statin Drugs, Side Effects and the Misguided War on Cholesterol .


http://almostlucidthoughts.tumblr.com/post/34822043967/the-astronauts-who-put-the-usa-on-the-moon

While Duane E Graveline and F Curtis Michel left NASA without flying in space.
Graveline is missing from the photo above. He was removed from the program almost immediately as a consequence of his wife filing for divorce.


Drugs | alternativecomplementarymedicine.com

Interview: Duane Graveline - Medical Doctor, Astronaut, and Critic of Lipitor and Other Cholesterol-Lowering Statin Drugs
Interview: Duane Graveline - Medical Doctor, Astronaut, and Critic of Lipitor and Other Cholesterol-Lowering Statin Drugs Dr. Graveline began his medical odyssey at the famed Walter Reed Army Hospital during the time when America's space pioneers were just beginning to study the medical effects of space flight.


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