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Wrong Dennis Desjardin?

Dennis E. Desjardin

Professor of Mycology

San Francisco State University

HQ Phone:  (415) 405-7700

Direct Phone: (415) ***-****direct phone

Email: d***@***.edu

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San Francisco State University

1600 Holloway Ave

San Francisco, California, 94132

United States

Company Description

San Francisco State University, with a student population of over 29,000 students, is one of the 23 campuses that make up the California State University system, the largest system of higher education in the country. SFSU's mission is to create and maintain an...more

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Web References(162 Total References)


California Fungi -- Acknowledgments

Special thanks to Herb Saylor who wrote the much of the first glossary and dedication and helped with descriptions; Mike Boom for his excellent editorial skills; and Dr. Dennis Desjardin of San Francisco State University for his mycological expertise.


MykoWeb-Book Review

By Dennis E. Desjardin, Michael G. Wood, and Frederick A. Stevens
Dennis Desjardin is Professor of Biology at San Francisco State University, where he received his master's degree under the supervision of the late Harry Thiers, to whom the book is dedicated. Upon Harry's retirement, Dennis was hired as his successor and has carried on the Thiers tradition of research on fungus systematics and award-winning teaching. Mike Wood and Fred Stevens are long-time members of the Mycological Society of San Francisco who also were influenced heavily by Thiers and have played important roles in the annual field course held at the University's Sierra Nevada Field Campus, both during the Thiers years and later during the courses taught by Desjardin. Wood and Stevens provided the bulk of the photos, with Desjardin and 21 other photographers contributing additional images.


October « 2006 « Isegoria

Since 2002 Cassius Stevani, professor of chemistry at the University of São Paulo; Dennis Desjardin, professor of mycology at San Francisco State University in California; and Marina Capelari of Brazil's Institute of Botany have discovered ten more bioluminescent fungi species - four of which are new to science - in Brazil's tropical forests.


MykoWeb-Mushrooms of Hawai'i

By Don E. Hemmes & Dennis E. Desjardin
During times when there is a dearth of good new mushroom books, it is a pleasure to peruse the fine new book by Don E. Hemmes and Dennis E. Desjardin, Mushrooms of Hawai'i: an identification guide. Dr. Hemmes is professor of biology at the University of Hawai'i in Hilo and Dr. Desjardin is professor of biology at San Francisco State University and scientific advisor for the Mycological Society of San Francisco. A research project funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation formed the basis of Desjardin & Hemmes' knowledge of the mycota of Hawaiian Islands. Before this project, relatively little was known about the mushrooms and other macrofungi of Hawai'i.


7 new luminescent mushroom species discovered

San Francisco State University Biology Professor Dennis Desjardin and colleagues discovered the fungi in Belize, Brazil, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Japan, Malaysia and Puerto Rico and these discoveries mean four species that are absolutely new and three new reports of luminescence in already known species.
What's really interesting is that three quarters of these glowing shrooms belong to the Mycena genus, a group that feed off and decompose organic matter as a source of nutrients. ADVERTISEMENT "What interests us is that within Mycena, the luminescent species come from 16 different lineages, which suggests that luminescence evolved at a single point and some species later lost the ability to glow," said Desjardin "It's pretty unusual to find this many luminescent species, typically only two to five percent of the species we collect in the field glow," Desjardin said. "I'm certain there are more out there." shrooms-3 They have already named two of the species Mycena luxaeterna (eternal light) and Mycena luxperpetua (perpetual light), inspired by Mozart's Requiem, and also by the fact that they glow 24 hours a day. Until today, Desjardin has discovered more than 200 glow in the dark species of mushrooms, and while I'm not sure how useful they really are, one thing's for sure: they're really cool.


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