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Wrong David Longstaff?

David J. Longstaff

Quartermaster General and Department

Army Corps

HQ Phone:  (703) 781-7819

Email: d***@***.mil

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Army Corps

9900 Belvoir Road

Fort Belvoir, Virginia, 22060

United States

Company Description

As one of the finest National Guard bands in the nation, the 122nd utilizes its resources to perform dozens of missions each year across the state. Citizens, soldiers, and musicians alike all agree that the 122nd Army Band is one of the leading groups of its k...more

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Web References(21 Total References)


http://www.acfchefs.org/Source/Events/Judges.cfm

David J Longstaff, CEC, AAC
(804) 605-0606 david.longstaff@us.army.mil


Army FS News- Army Chef Inducted into Top Culinary Society

David J. Longstaff, senior mission command food advisor and a certified executive chef, into their honor society July 20 at the
Marriott Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. An induction into the AAC is reserved for individuals who have made significant contributions to both the culinary profession and the American Culinary Federation. Out of 19,000 ACF members, only 800 have been inducted into the AAC honor society, and Chief Longstaff is the third military person to receive this honor. "I've been trying to bridge the gap between military and civilian food service for a long time," said Chief Longstaff. "I wanted to take what I'd learned in the Army and see how it would transition in the civilian world." Chief Longstaff enlisted in the Army as a cook in 1984 and attended the Warrant Officer Candidate Course in 1995. He attributes his success in the civilian culinary arena to positions he has held in the Army and opportunities to compete internationally, and said he pursued culinary arts and judging because he gets to work with and mentor Soldiers. "I tell young Soldiers to taste everything and ask themselves if they would pay for the food they'd prepared in a high-end restaurant," he said. Longstaff is passionate in his support of the military and the American Culinary Federation." Chief Longstaff's passion for cooking began when he was a child and his parents, who worked outside the home, would leave dinner recipes on the counter for him and his brother to cook. Chief Longstaff has competed in culinary competitions since 1987. He managed the U. S. Army Culinary Arts Team from 2003-2006, when the team won 33 medals at the 2004 Culinary Olympics in Erfurt, Germany; the junior team also won silver and bronze medals while competing in England in 2005. He also served as a judge and show chair for the U.S. Army Culinary Competition for three years. Chief Warrant Officer 4 David J. Longstaff, senior mission


Press Releases

David Longstaff, CEC, AAC; senior mission command food advisor, U.S. Army; Old Dominion ACF Chapter


pr140218 - Chief Warrant Officer 5 David Longstaff, CEC, AAC, Presented with President's Medallion

Chief Warrant Officer 5 David Longstaff, CEC®, AAC®, Presented with President's Medallion from the American Culinary Federation
St. Augustine, Fla., February 18, 2014-Chief Warrant Officer 5 David Longstaff, CEC, AAC, army food advisor, Joint Culinary Center of Excellence, Fort Lee, Va., was presented with a President's Medallion by the American Culinary Federation's (ACF) National President Thomas Macrina, CEC®, CCA®, AAC®. Longstaff received the award during his retirement dinner at Fort Lee, Va., January 31. During the presentations after dinner, Macrina gave his first President's Medallion to Longstaff for his contributions to the culinary profession. Before his retirement, Longstaff was responsible for advising the Quartermaster General and Department of Army G4 on all aspects of the army foodservice program. His civilian education includes an associate degree in culinary skills and a bachelor's degree in management from The Culinary Institute of America, Hyde Park, N.Y. He has received several awards from ACF, including a Cutting Edge Award in 2010 and his first President's Medallion in 2006. Longstaff is a member of Old Dominion ACF Chapter. Chief Warrant Officer 5 David Longstaff, CEC®, AAC®, Presented with President's Medallion from the American Culinary Federation


Army Times - News - More News

RICHMOND, Va. - Chief Warrant Officer David J. Longstaff learned to always prepare for the worst and hope for the best.But as temperatures reached 110 degrees during a supply run to downtown Baghdad, Longstaff found this particular outing would be far more eventful than the previous 150 shopping trips.Longstaff, 43, is credited with saving the lives of five of his fellow soldiers pinned by insurgent fire, earning the 1st Armored Division food service technician a Bronze Star with Valor."I was intrigued that as a cook, I found myself in the middle of Baghdad taking fire," he said, looking back on his lifesaving mission."It just goes to show what you can do when put into any situation.So you should just be prepared."Usually procurement missions to downtown Baghdad went smoothly.Longstaff would make his way through the shopping district in his Humvee, get his supplies and return to camp to prepare food in a trailer for 1,200 soldiers per meal.In August 2003, Longstaff was driving back to camp when he saw a burning Humvee in the middle of the street.It had been hit by a rocket-propelled grenade and soldiers were being ambushed.Hostile fire was coming from buildings on the north and south sides of the street.Longstaff positioned his Humvee between the soldiers taking fire and the insurgents, then ordered the other vehicles in his convoy to secure the rear.As he stood behind his Humvee, Longstaff laid down suppressive fire, helping to evacuate the injured away from the area.It was Longstaff's quick reaction to the situation that allowed the other soldiers to make it across the street and move out of harm's way, Army officials said.No one was killed in the skirmish, but Longstaff said there were some injuries.But playing the nearly 15-minute event back in his mind, Longstaff recalls the firefight in slow motion, remembering the eeriest sound he has ever heard - the "tinking" of the bullets hitting a light post.Sgt. 1st Class Richard Bryant was part of Longstaff's convoy.Longstaff during the ambush.Bryant said the way Longstaff handled the situation is a "true testament of his technical and tactical expertise""His actions are nothing short of heroic," Bryant said.Longstaff, now chief of the Advanced Culinary Skills Branch at Fort Lee 25 miles south of Richmond, recently was awarded his medal.For Longstaff, the recognition is a humbling one.One he said validates what happened.One that he can share with his family - his wife, Ginger, and their two children: Jonathan, 13, and Michael, 18, who is in the Navy.The events go far beyond what Longstaff expected after leaving his hometown of Orlando, Fla., to join the Army 22 years ago - and far different from the training he first received.Longstaff said the military is using encounters like theirs to better train soldiers for the new urban warfare against unknown enemies.Back on the homefront, Longstaff, manager of the U.S. Army culinary team, trains cooks for the highest levels of service at the White House, Air Force One and the Pentagon.He heads a battle of his own doing - a culinary competition between more than 150 soldiers."Regardless of where you compete in the world of chefs," he said, "we are warriors first, and that's important."


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