Daniel Witt

Daniel M. Witt

Professor (Clinical) Dpt.chair at University of Utah

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Location:
201 Presidents Circle Room 201, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
HQ Phone:
(801) 581-7200

General Information

Experience

National Blood Clot Alliance

Senior Manager Clinical Pharmacy Research and Applied Pharmacogenomics  - Kaiser Permanente

Education

BS  - Pharmacy , University of Utah

PharmD  - 

PharmD  - University of Washington

Affiliations

Board Member  - American College of Clinical Pharmacy

Board Member  - AC Forum

Board Member  - Anticoagulation Forum

Panel Member for Venous Thromboembolism Guidelines  - American Society of Hematology

Member  - American College of Chest Physician's Consensus Panel

Board of Governors Member  - Official Reviewer-ACC

Recent News  

Daniel M. Witt, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS
Dr. Witt is a Professor (clinical) and Vice Chair of the Department of Pharmacotherapy at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy. He received the B.S. degree in pharmacy from the University of Utah and the PharmD degree from the University of Washington. He completed a Clinical Pharmacy Residency at the University of Washington and Harborview Medical Centers, Seattle, WA, and an Advanced Residency in Primary Care and Family Medicine, University of Washington. Dr. Witt has authored or co-authored more than 90 journal articles and 11 book chapters, and has given numerous lectures for continuing education programs. His research interests center on providing practical information regarding the optimal use of anticoagulation therapy to front-line practitioners and patients. He was a panel member for the 2012 CHEST Consensus Guidelines for Antithrombotic therapy and is currently serving as a panel member for venous thromboembolism guidelines being developed by the American Society of Hematology. Dr. Witt also serves on the Board of Directors for the Anticoagulation Forum and is a member of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists, and the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Daniel Witt, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS, CACP
Daniel M. Witt Daniel Witt Dan Witt is Professor (Clinical) and Vice Chair of the Department of Pharmacotherapy at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy. He received the B.S. degree in pharmacy from the University of Utah and the PharmD degree from the University of Washington. He completed a Clinical Pharmacy Residency at the University of Washington and Harborview Medical Centers, Seattle, WA and an Advanced Residency in Primary Care and Family Medicine, University of Washington. Dr. Witt has authored or co-authored over 90 journal articles, 11 book chapters, and given numerous lectures for continuing education programs. His research interests center on providing practical information regarding the optimal use of anticoagulation therapy to front-line practitioners and patients. He was a panel member for the 2012 CHEST Consensus Guidelines for Antithrombotic therapy and is currently serving as a panel member for venous thromboembolism guidelines being developed by the American Society of Hematology. Dr. Witt also serves on the Board of Directors for the Anticoagulation Forum and is a member of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists and the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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"I think it's important that reversal agents are available," said Daniel Witt, vice chair and clinical professor at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy in Salt Lake City.
"But when you look at the actual outcomes of bleeding . . . associated with the new drugs, compared to warfarin, even without the availability of reversal agents most patients that suffer bleeding complications tend to do as well as, if not better than, patients treated with warfarin." According to the guideline, research indicates that despite the lack of specific reversal agents for NOACs, the risk of a fatal bleed in patients treated with these anticoagulants "appears to be no higher" than for patients taking VKA therapy. Witt is a past expert panelist for the VTE guideline writing group but was not involved in the most recent revision of the document. He said the recommendation in favor of NOACs was probably the most notable revision in the guideline. "For the treatment of venous thromboembolism, . . . I think it makes a lot of sense to use the newer drugs over low-molecular-weight heparin and warfarin therapy. The outcomes are not dramatically different," Witt said. "But I think that the big thing is that [the newer drugs] are so much easier to coordinate than low-molecular-weight heparin and warfarin." Witt said that long-term treatment of VTE usually requires patients to self-administer their medications and travel to a clinic or laboratory for regular INR monitoring and subsequent dosage adjustments. "With the new drugs, you just prescribe the medication to be taken orally, and you don't have to go through all that," Witt said. So I think that there still is a place for warfarin therapy management," Witt said. He added that because the newer oral anticoagulants are "very dependent on renal function" for elimination, there will continue to be a need for warfarin as a treatment option. Witt said that even though patients taking a NOAC don't need the regular bloodwork that is necessary for managing VKA therapy, it's still necessary to "keep an eye on the patients" to minimize their bleeding risk. "Situations are going to arise where they might have to have an invasive procedure, or there needs to be some management and coordination of their therapies," Witt said.

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