Daniel Stemm

last updated 12/21/2017

Daniel D. Stemm

Vice President at Heraeus Inc.

Location:
770 Township Line Road Suite 300, Morrisville, Pennsylvania, United States
Company:
Heraeus Inc.
HQ Phone:
(215) 944-9981

General Information

Experience

Director of Global Business Development - Heraeus Vadnais , Inc.

Vice President and General Manager - Reell Precision Manufacturing Corporation

Recent News  

Members

Daniel D. Stemm - Vice President, Global Key Accounts And Government Affairs
dan.stemm@heraeus.com

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Ventura's China Trip - Reell Precision Manufacturing

SHANGHAI -- Daniel Stemm, a St. Paul executive who calls himself an Asian "road warrior," thinks he won a big battle this week because of Gov.
Taking part in the governor's trade mission to China, Stemm, 39, who works for a company that makes hinges for laptop computers, got in on a visit to the company in Beijing that makes Legend computers. It's China's largest computer producer and a firm poised to do battle with the top five laptop companies in the world. Daniel Stemm Those who say Ventura's trade missions are of little value simply don't know what they're talking about, Stemm said. Other Minnesota businesspeople on the trip -- there are about 60 -- similarly are hoping to see doors open in China. Talking over dim sum in a restaurant in Shanghai on Wednesday night, Stemm grew animated as he described the breakthrough he thinks he won in Beijing the previous day. "I've been trying to get to Legend for a long time," said Stemm, who spends a grueling two weeks per month in Asia selling his hinges and keeping buyers happy. "Because I was on this mission, I met with a level of people I never could have met on my own. He also was able to tour the plant, which he never has been able to do on his own, he said. With that foot in the door, Stemm said, he is convinced he has a good chance of supplying Legend with the hinges, which make a laptop screen stay in place at the correct angle. He said the mechanisms, made by the Reell Precision Manufacturing Corp. of Vadnais Heights, are sold to four of the top five international laptop producers. The company, which also makes a device that is used in copy machines, has about 200 employees and had sales of about $21 million last year, Stemm said. Some of the business executives on the trip are in Asia for the first time, but Stemm is in a class of veterans who spend much of their life in airports and maintaining a brutal schedule that consists of long flights, long days of negotiating and then socializing with Asian clients, then all-night sessions sending reports back home. "This trip has been really special for us. We're allowed to network and socialize and even sleep," he said. "The road warriors are all chuckling, and saying things like, 'Did you really get eight hours of sleep last night?' " Stemm said few people understand how labor-intensive it is to build and maintain business with Asian customers. Now a vice president and general manager of computer products for Reell, he said that when he started with the company in 1997, the officers knew that road time was important, but didn't understand how much. "They would visit twice a year and wonder why sales were not happening," he said. Over the past five years, all of the companies that Reell supplies have moved their manufacturing operations to Asia. Typically, Stemm deals simultaneously with "engineers in Austin, Texas, deciding how the product should look, engineers in Taiwan figuring out how it should be built, and a factory in Shanghai actually building it." When he started, he said, he was traveling to Asia every six to eight weeks, but he has maintained the pace of two weeks out of the month for the past three years.

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Reell Precision

SHANGHAI -- Daniel Stemm, a St. Paul executive who calls himself an Asian "road warrior," thinks he won a big battle this week because of Gov.Taking part in the governor's trade mission to China, Stemm, 39, who works for a company that makes hinges for laptop computers, got in on a visit to the company in Beijing that makes Legend computers.It's China's largest computer producer and a firm poised to do battle with the top five laptop companies in the world. , Daniel StemmThose who say Ventura's trade missions are of little value simply don't know what they're talking about, Stemm said. Other Minnesota businesspeople on the trip -- there are about 60 -- similarly are hoping to see doors open in China.Talking over dim sum in a restaurant in Shanghai on Wednesday night, Stemm grew animated as he described the breakthrough he thinks he won in Beijing the previous day."I've been trying to get to Legend for a long time," said Stemm, who spends a grueling two weeks per month in Asia selling his hinges and keeping buyers happy. "Because I was on this mission, I met with a level of people I never could have met on my own."He also was able to tour the plant, which he never has been able to do on his own, he said. With that foot in the door, Stemm said, he is convinced he has a good chance of supplying Legend with the hinges, which make a laptop screen stay in place at the correct angle.He said the mechanisms, made by the Reell Precision Manufacturing Corp. of Vadnais Heights, are sold to four of the top five international laptop producers.The company, which also makes a device that is used in copy machines, has about 200 employees and had sales of about $21 million last year, Stemm said.Some of the business executives on the trip are in Asia for the first time, but Stemm is in a class of veterans who spend much of their life in airports and maintaining a brutal schedule that consists of long flights, long days of negotiating and then socializing with Asian clients, then all-night sessions sending reports back home."This trip has been really special for us.We're allowed to network and socialize and even sleep," he said."The road warriors are all chuckling, and saying things like, 'Did you really get eight hours of sleep last night?' " Stemm said few people understand how labor-intensive it is to build and maintain business with Asian customers.Now a vice president and general manager of computer products for Reell, he said that when he started with the company in 1997, the officers knew that road time was important, but didn't understand how much."They would visit twice a year and wonder why sales were not happening," he said.Over the past five years, all of the companies that Reell supplies have moved their manufacturing operations to Asia. Typically, Stemm deals simultaneously with "engineers in Austin, Texas, deciding how the product should look, engineers in Taiwan figuring out how it should be built, and a factory in Shanghai actually building it." When he started, he said, he was traveling to Asia every six to eight weeks, but he has maintained the pace of two weeks out of the month for the past three years.

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