Daniel Schabacker

Daniel S. Schabacker

Biological Safety Officer at The Argonne

Location:
1629 Columbia Road NW, Washington, D.C., District of Columbia, United States
Company:
The Argonne
HQ Phone:
(202) 462-6600

General Information

Experience

Lead Scientist for the Development of the Argonne National Laboratory Biochip Portfolio  - Biochip Group

Education

PhD  - Immunology , University of Illinois

Affiliations

Board Member  - Bioactive Paper

Board Member  - Sentinel Bioactive Paper Network

Advisory Board Member  - BiTmaP

Recent News  

Biochips have already shown promise in diagnostic medicine, according to Argonne biologist Daniel Schabacker, who developed the technology.
In addition to Eprogen, three other companies have licensed biochips, he said. "Suppose someone shows up to the hospital and they're sick with an upper respiratory infection," said Schabacker. "First thing a doctor is going to want to know is whether the infection is viral or bacterial; this is especially true in pediatrics. And ideally, they'd really like to have a single test that they can run very rapidly that will identify exactly which disease you have from a dozen top targets." The development of products like TruArray will soon revolutionize doctors' ability to quickly diagnose a number of diseases, Schabacker said. Though the analysis of a sample on a biochip can take 30 minutes, scientists can have much more confidence in the accuracy of the diagnosis, according to Schabacker. "Biochips give us the ability to run a test that allows your doctor to figure out exactly what you're suffering from during the time that you're in his or her office," he said. While biochips will allow doctors to more quickly and authoritatively explain your sniffles, they might also be used for patients who exhibit symptoms of much more serious infections. By adding just a few more drops to the chip's array, Schabacker claimed, lab technicians could test for a whole slate of biotoxins and especially virulent diseases from the plague to smallpox to anthrax. "The most important thing with these types of infections is that you have to be right and get the answer quickly," Schabacker said.

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"Say someone shows up at the hospital and they're sick with an upper respiratory infection," said Argonne biologist Daniel Schabacker.
"First thing a doctor is going to want to know is whether the infection is viral or bacterial; this is especially true in pediatrics. And ideally, they'd really like to have a single test that they can run very rapidly that will identify exactly which disease you have from a dozen top targets." The biochip technology has shown tremendous promise in tests conducted at a number of labs and hospitals around the country, Schabacker said, and as a result four private companies have licensed the chips' core technology from Argonne. The development of products like TruArray will soon revolutionize doctors' ability to diagnose a number of diseases, Schabacker said. For example, while existing rapid strep tests performed by many pediatricians take only a few minutes to process, they yield so many false negatives doctors routinely send out the samples for subsequent rounds of more thorough, time-consuming and expensive analysis. Though the analysis of a sample on a biochip can take 30 minutes, scientists can have much more confidence in the accuracy of the diagnosis, according to Schabacker. "Biochips give us the ability to run a test that allows your doctor to figure out exactly what you're suffering from during the time that you're in his or her office," he said. The chips might also be used in more dire circumstances, such as when a patient presents with a potentially deadly and contagious infection. By adding a few more drops to the chip's array, Schabacker claimed, lab technicians could test for a whole slate of biotoxins and diseases such as the plague or smallpox. The most important thing with these types of infections is that you have to be right and get the answer quickly," Schabacker said.

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