Dan Phillips

last updated 2/27/2018

Dan K. Phillips

Assistant Turf Services Manager at Zander Sod Co

Location:
17525 Jane Street, King City, Ontario, Canada
Company:
Zander Sod Co
HQ Phone:
(416) 364-5700

General Information

Experience

Realtor - The Heidi Lussi

SAGD Supervisor - Nexen Inc.

Pad Supervisor - Suncor Energy Inc.

Realtor - RE/MAX Vernon (Sole

Environment Artist - Microsoft Corporation

Sales Manager - Elite Luxury Car Sales Ltd

Partner - Sparky Marquis

Contributing Editor - Wine & Food magazine

Travel Writer - Alaska

Torbreck

Well Pads Supervisor - Suncor Energy Inc.

Environment Artist - Camouflaj LLC

Supervisor - Meadow Lake Mechnical Pulp

Affiliations

Chief Executive Officer and Owner - The Grateful Palate

Founder - Bacon of the Month

Founder - Club

Recent News  

About Us - Zander Sod Co. Limited

Dan Phillips, Assistant Turf Services Manager
905-955-5047

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About The Grateful Palate - The Grateful Palate

Owner and founder Dan Philips.
designed by Basora coded by Agusti B.R.

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Captain Bacon discovers Tripp Country Ham & Bacon

It stands to reason, then, that Dan Philips is one of my few heroes.
A contributing editor to FOOD & WINE, Philips is the founder of the Grateful Palate, a wine importer and mail-order epicurean-foods company perhaps best known as the perpetrator of the Bacon of the Month Club. The Bacon of the Month Club works like the Book of the Month Club, except that the book club mails you some fat best-seller that sits on a shelf until your next yard sale, while a pound of bacon from the Grateful Palate usually finds itself in a hot skillet before the mailman can say good-bye. One customer wrote Philips to say that each time a new shipment arrives, her husband dances around the box. The Grateful Palate now offers more than 30 artisanal bacons from all over the United States, and collectively they outsell everything else in the catalog, including stunning bottles of Australian Shiraz and more esoteric treats, like crimson pumpkinseed oil from Austria. Philips, a native Californian, grew up eating bacon almost every day and still does, but he was nonetheless surprised by the size and excitability of the audience for it. He knew something powerful was at work, but he wasn't sure what. "I don't know much about bacon, other than how it tastes," he told me recently. Then he said that he was thinking of calling on some of his favorite producers to see if he could learn why their bacons are so different from one another. Western Kentucky and Tennessee are particularly rich in makers of country bacon-pork bellies that are cured with salt and sugar, hung to dry and then saturated with hickory smoke. This suggested to Philips a road trip, starting in Louisville and meandering south-by-southwest down country roads in search of knowledge, wisdom and pork products. I didn't beg. Perhaps I did drop a few dark warnings about the dangers facing the solitary hunter of breakfast meats in isolated rural areas. A few days later, Philips sent an e-mail inviting me to ride shotgun on his bacon safari. "I have a few stipulations," he wrote. "Dan, would you like to help us cure some? Philips coated a slab with the sand-colored rub until it looked like a boogie board after a day at the beach. That this rivalry with his Jewish father set young Dan Philips on a path that has now brought him to his mother's home state in search of the flesh of the swine struck me as material that would keep a psychoanalyst busy for years. Philips asked if his family has always had the recipe. Dan Philips phoned me a few weeks after our trip to say he'd been listening to a lot of blues and eating even more bacon than usual. He'd just received a package in the mail: first-run samples of Grateful Palate private-label bacon, cured and smoked by Charlie Gatton following a recipe that Philips had whispered in his ear on our visit. Philips said he thought it turned out "pretty damn good" and offered to send me a pound. But no matter how many times I asked, he wouldn't tell me exactly how it was made. That, he said, would have to remain a mystery.

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