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Wrong Crystal Lameman?

Crystal Lameman

Treaty Coordinator and Communications Manager

Beaver Lake Cree Nation

HQ Phone:  (780) 623-9221

Email: c***@***.ca

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Beaver Lake Cree Nation

204 10115 101 Ave

Lac La Biche, Alberta, T0A 2C0

Canada

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Web References(83 Total References)


Michigan Coalition Against Tar Sands » Fighting to stop tar sands infrastructure in the Great Lakes region

During a tour next week through Sarnia, southwest Detroit, Battle Creek and Grand Rapids, Beaver Lake Cree Nation tribal leader Crystal Lameman will travel to Michigan and Ontario, joining other speakers in shining a spotlight on how tar sands mining in her Alberta homeland is devastating lives and threatening the environment at its source in the western reaches of Canada to impacting public health and our environment throughout Michigan and the Great Lakes region from the Straits of Mackinac, the Kalamazoo River and southwest Detroit to Ontario.
Lameman brings her message to Michigan and Ontario: The Real Costs of Oil: The Case for Justice at the Ends of the Pipeline. Who: Beaver Lake Cree Nation leader Crystal Lameman, Council of Canadians, Aamjiwnaang First Nation, Windsor on Watch, 48217 Citizens Group, Sierra Club, Michigan Native American Lee Sprague, West Michigan Environmental Action Council, Wege Foundation. Crystal Lameman and others will spotlight the human and environmental impacts of tar sands mining, the largest industrial project in the world with devastating consequences for people from western Canada to Michigan and Ontario. 20th Annual Wege Speaker Series with Crystal Lameman, Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Road S.E., Grand Rapids. Grand Rapids Brewing Co., 1 Ionia Ave SW, Grand Rapids, MI. Lunch & Learn with Crystal Lameman. Doors open at 11:30am. *Lunch not provided. Contact Rachel Hood 616-822-0700 Background Crystal Lameman is a member of the Beaver Lake Cree Nation, whose homeland is the site of the massive "tar sands" oil development in Alberta, Canada. The indigenous people of the Beaver Lake Cree Nation live in an area of forest the size of Switzerland and, based on their Treaty of 1876, enjoy legal rights to hunt, fish and trap in their territory, as their ancestors have done for generations. In 2008, the Nation launched a Treaty Rights litigation against the Canadian government, claiming that the 19,000+ fossil fuel projects in their territory violate their treaty rights and threaten to destroy their way of life by polluting and fragmenting the land and water that have sustained them for centuries. Lameman, who serves as the Intergovernmental Affairs and Industry Relations Treaty Coordinator and Communications Manager for the Nation, combines her academic background and her indigenous ways of knowing to articulate the devastating impacts of the largest industrial project in the world. A Newsweek cover story this month documented the scourge of asthma and other health impacts in southwest Detroit near the Marathon Petroleum Refinery. Major public attention is also on the safety of the oil pipeline running underneath the Straits of Mackinac and to proposals to ship tar sands-derived oil on the Great Lakes. Meanwhile, First Nation tribes have been protesting pollution from oil refineries in Sarnia, Ontario. Less attention has been paid to the environmental and human costs of tar sands production at the locations of the mines. Lameman will deepen the understanding of what is happening at the source as she speaks about her people's fight for justice on the front lines.


This Week: Canadian Tribal Leader Tour to Spotlight Cost of Tar Sands Oil For Michigan, Sarnia » Michigan Coalition Against Tar Sands

During a tour next week through Sarnia, southwest Detroit, Battle Creek and Grand Rapids, Beaver Lake Cree Nation tribal leader Crystal Lameman will travel to Michigan and Ontario, joining other speakers in shining a spotlight on how tar sands mining in her Alberta homeland is devastating lives and threatening the environment at its source in the western reaches of Canada to impacting public health and our environment throughout Michigan and the Great Lakes region from the Straits of Mackinac, the Kalamazoo River and southwest Detroit to Ontario.
Lameman brings her message to Michigan and Ontario: The Real Costs of Oil: The Case for Justice at the Ends of the Pipeline. Who: Beaver Lake Cree Nation leader Crystal Lameman, Council of Canadians, Aamjiwnaang First Nation, Windsor on Watch, 48217 Citizens Group, Sierra Club, Michigan Native American Lee Sprague, West Michigan Environmental Action Council, Wege Foundation. Crystal Lameman and others will spotlight the human and environmental impacts of tar sands mining, the largest industrial project in the world with devastating consequences for people from western Canada to Michigan and Ontario. 20th Annual Wege Speaker Series with Crystal Lameman, Aquinas College Performing Arts Center, 1703 Robinson Road S.E., Grand Rapids. Grand Rapids Brewing Co., 1 Ionia Ave SW, Grand Rapids, MI. Lunch & Learn with Crystal Lameman. Doors open at 11:30am. *Lunch not provided. Contact Rachel Hood 616-822-0700 Background Crystal Lameman is a member of the Beaver Lake Cree Nation, whose homeland is the site of the massive "tar sands" oil development in Alberta, Canada. The indigenous people of the Beaver Lake Cree Nation live in an area of forest the size of Switzerland and, based on their Treaty of 1876, enjoy legal rights to hunt, fish and trap in their territory, as their ancestors have done for generations. In 2008, the Nation launched a Treaty Rights litigation against the Canadian government, claiming that the 19,000+ fossil fuel projects in their territory violate their treaty rights and threaten to destroy their way of life by polluting and fragmenting the land and water that have sustained them for centuries. Lameman, who serves as the Intergovernmental Affairs and Industry Relations Treaty Coordinator and Communications Manager for the Nation, combines her academic background and her indigenous ways of knowing to articulate the devastating impacts of the largest industrial project in the world. A Newsweek cover story this month documented the scourge of asthma and other health impacts in southwest Detroit near the Marathon Petroleum Refinery. Major public attention is also on the safety of the oil pipeline running underneath the Straits of Mackinac and to proposals to ship tar sands-derived oil on the Great Lakes. Meanwhile, First Nation tribes have been protesting pollution from oil refineries in Sarnia, Ontario. Less attention has been paid to the environmental and human costs of tar sands production at the locations of the mines. Lameman will deepen the understanding of what is happening at the source as she speaks about her people's fight for justice on the front lines.


Speaker Biographies - 350 Maine

Crystal Lameman- of the Beaver Lake Cree Nation.
The case is currently being carried forward by the Beaver Lake Cree's leadership, and Crystal uses this as one example of how First Nations people can assert their rights whilst offering folks a solution.


Protecting treaty rights and traditional lands | The Griff

Crystal Lameman is a passionate advocate for the protection of natural resources and the preservation of indigenous cultures in current and future generations.
She is the current treaty coordinator and communications manager for Beaver Lake Cree Nation. Her work is dedicated to developing sustainable energy ideas and the preservation of traditional lands and treaty rights. Lameman's presentation at MacEwan University on Feb. 29 focused on the difficulties faced by indigenous people living on Treaty 6 land, where communities are severely underfunded and are excluded from policy development. Lameman also spoke of the need for economic sovereignty for First Nations people, and the ability to self-determine. "Article 32 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples states that 'Indigenous peoples have the right to determine and develop the priorities and strategies for the development or use of the lands, territories, and resources,'" Lameman said. The difficulties the Beaver Lake Cree Nation faces are tragic. Oil spills are contaminating the groundwater that First Nations people depend on for drinking and cooking food, among other basic needs. "I didn't come here to sell you anything. I came here to tell you the truth . . . and the truth of the matter is that people are dying," Lameman said. First Nations people are experiencing devastating losses. In one year, the Beaver Lake Cree Nation lost five young men to suicide, according to Lameman. Through the oil and gas industry's destruction of traditional treaty lands, the Beaver Lake Cree people are losing their hope for the future and beginning to lose almost all of their traditional ways of life. "Our babies are being airlifted to the U of A for drinking contaminated water," Lameman said. "Beaver Lake Cree's traditional territory spans 38,972 square kilometres, [and] 34,773 square kilometres of that is oil and gas well sites," Lameman said. The "tar sands trial" has shown that indigenous rights are one of the last legally binding strongholds preventing the expansion of the oil and gas industry. However, that is not the ultimate goal of the Beaver Lake Cree people. Their ultimate goal is to regain their right to self-determine, according to Lameman. "Honour those who came before us, meeting the needs of the present generations, not compromising the future," said Lameman, "so that the coming generations are able to meet their own needs and guide our vision and renew each cycle of life."


PM Press - News > Additional Stories

Crystal Lameman, a member of Beaver Lake Cree Nation in Alberta, Canada and an Indigenous rights and tar sands campaigner, notes:


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