Bryon Petersen

Bryon E. Petersen

Adjunct Professor at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Location:
1 Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
HQ Phone:
(336) 713-7293

General Information

Experience

Professor  - University of Florida

Education

BA  - University of Iowa

MS  - University of Pittsburgh

Ph.D.  - University of Florida

Ph.D.  - University of Pittsburgh

Ph.D.  - William L. McKnight Brain Institute of UF

Affiliations

Board Member  - American Society for Investigative Pathology

Founder  - Society of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology

Recent News  

The ability of the liver to grow in size when lobes are removed is sometimes referred to as regeneration, but this is a misnomer, said co-author Bryon Petersen, Ph.D., who was a professor of regenerative medicine at Wake Forest Baptist during the period the research occurred.
Instead, through a proliferation of cells, the remaining tissue grows to compensate for the lost size. In contrast, the hallmark of true regeneration is following nature's "pattern" to exactly duplicate size, form and function, Petersen said. "If we can understand the bladder's regenerative process, the hope is that we can prompt the regeneration of other organs and tissues where structure is important -- from the intestine and spinal cord to the heart," said Petersen. Charles C. Peyton, David Burmeister, Bryon Petersen, Karl-Erik Andersson, George Christ.

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The ability of the liver to grow in size when lobes are removed is sometimes referred to as regeneration, but this is a misnomer, said co-author Bryon Petersen, Ph.D., who was a professor of regenerative medicine at Wake Forest Baptist during the period the research occurred.
Instead, through a proliferation of cells, the remaining tissue grows to compensate for the lost size. In contrast, the hallmark of true regeneration is following nature's "pattern" to exactly duplicate size, form and function, Petersen said. "If we can understand the bladder's regenerative process, the hope is that we can prompt the regeneration of other organs and tissues where structure is important - from the intestine and spinal cord to the heart," said Petersen.

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"This data may change the current thinking about what causes Type 1 diabetes," said Bryon E. Petersen, professor of regenerative medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and senior author of the study.
Petersen said IHoP was discovered in the mid-1990s.

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