Bill Whitfield

Bill Whitfield

Mayor at City of McKinney

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Location:
222 N Tennessee St, Mc Kinney, Texas, United States
HQ Phone:
(972) 547-7500

General Information

Experience

V. President  - The California State Old Time Fiddlers' Association

West Texas District Retail Sales Manager  - Kraft Foods Inc.

Partner  - Texas A&M University

Education

Bachelor of Science  - Occupational Education , Wayland Baptist University

Affiliations

Board Member  - North Collin County Habitat

Board Member  - Regional Transportation Council

Executive Committee Member  - Dallas Regional Mobility Coalition

Member  - Transportation

Member of Several Committees On the U.S. Conference  - The Mayors' Institute

Member  - Infrastructure Committee for the U.S. Conference of Mayors

Member  - Energy

Member of the Steering Committee  - National Watershed Coalition

TEX-21 Member  - TEX-21

Council Member  - District 1 Gilda Garza

Recent News  

Bill Whitfield
Bill Whitfield served two terms as Mayor of the City of McKinney, during which time he was a staunch supporter of The Crape Myrtle Trails of McKinney project. Upon leaving that office, Bill was elected to board membership (2009). Bill and his wife moved to McKinney in 1992. He is retired from a sales position with Kraft Foods. He is a member of the Subcommittee on Clean Air Quality and the Boards of McKinney Alliance, Cross Timbers Youth Orchestra and North Collin County Habitat for Humanity. In 2005 he received the Partner in Excellence Award from the National Watershed Coalition and the Metroplex Co-Champion Tree Certificate from the Texas Forest Service and Texas A&M. In 2007 he received a Distinguished Alumni Award from Wayland Baptist University. Bill says he joined to CMT project to further enhance the natural beauty of McKinney, to help establish The World Collection of Crape Myrtles at Craig Ranch, and to assist in forming a partnership between the City, developers and the CMT to plant 50,000 new crape myrtles in McKinney before 2114. (We are well on our way of achieving Bill's goal.)

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Bill Whitfield, Mayor, City of McKinney
McKinney Mayor Bill Whitfield has witnessed dramatic changes to his city since moving to the Collin County community 16 years ago. When Whitfield and his family arrived in the fast-growing northern suburb, McKinney's population was 23,000.

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McKinney Mayor Bill Whitfield has witnessed dramatic changes to his city since moving to the Collin County community 16 years ago.
When Whitfield and his family arrived in the fast-growing northern suburb, McKinney's population was 23,000. Today, more than 118,000 people call McKinney home, according to recently released estimates from the North Central Texas Council of Governments. "My first time to go to RTC, we didn't have any roads out here," Whitfield said. Whitfield is a familiar face on the Regional Transportation Council, recently expanded from 40 to 43 members, as the policymaking body's representative for the cities of McKinney, Allen and Frisco. He is not shy about speaking up about the interests of his city and county during RTC meetings. Whitfield also sees passenger rail service as an important part of McKinney's future, whether it's service to Plano in the next several years or a route to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport by 2030. "We can't build roads fast enough," he said. First elected to the McKinney City Council in 1998, Whitfield served two terms. Today, in addition to being a second-term mayor, he is involved in several regional and civic organizations. Whitfield and his wife, Jo Ann, have two daughters and two grandchildren. Whitfield also is a member of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, a nonpartisan group that seeks to foster closer ties between the federal government and cities. He serves on the Transportation and Communications Committee and the Mayors Water Council. With McKinney continuing to expand rapidly, Whitfield sees another issue with which it must deal in years to come: water. The city and Texas A&M University are involved in a research project studying the viability of drought-resistant grass and other vegetation. McKinney is well-positioned for the future, even with the economy encountering tough times, Whitfield said. While surrounding cities are heavily dependent on retail sales activity, 39 percent of McKinney's tax base is industrial (2006 figures), meaning many of its residents don't have to travel far to work. And that's just fine with Whitfield. "We want our people to be able to live, work, and play right here," he said.

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