Alaa Badr

Vice President, Customer Success at VMware , Inc.

Location:
3401 HILLVIEW AVENUE, Palo Alto, California, United States
Company:
VMware , Inc.
HQ Phone:
(650) 427-5000
Wrong Alaa Badr?

Last Updated 9/2/2017

General Information

Employment History

Amazon Web Services - Global Business Development  - Amazon.com, Inc.

Practice Manager  - Sterling Commerce Inc

Field Enablement Lead - Russia At Field Enablement Lead  - LinkedIn

Affiliations

Director Business Architecture; Windows Devices and Applications  - Microsoft Corporation

Web References  

http://www.thekitchn.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-workplace-during-ramadan-231921

(Image credit: Courtesy of Alaa Badr)
As Vice President for Cloud Services and End User Computing at VMWare, Alaa Badr enjoys some workplace flexibility, but he still has to assert time for religious observance within the hard-driving culture of high tech. Badr warns colleagues in advance that he'll be fasting to set expectations, yet business travel remains a challenge. Based in Seattle, Badr visits VMWare's Palo Alto headquarters frequently. He limits travel during Ramadan as much as he can to avoid disrupting his fasting routine. Islam allows travelers to break the fast as needed, but according to Badr, he's required to make those days up later, and he doesn't enjoy abstaining from food and drink after his fellow Muslims have resumed their normal routine. When a Ramadan trip to Silicon Valley is unavoidable, he'll ask colleagues to meet him in the office rather than over lunch or dinner at a restaurant. Lack of sleep during Ramadan is another concern for Badr, since evening prayers don't begin until 9 p.m. or so, followed by the iftar meal. "From a logistics perspective, I'm only functional after 10 a.m.," he explains. He tries to schedule important meetings or calls in the late morning when he's most alert, and also suggests employers be mindful of the late nights that are a part of Ramadan.

Read More
http://www.kplu.org/post/local-egyptian-reacts-news-cairos-tahrir-square

Microsoft software salesman Alaa Badr is one of them.
I reached him this afternoon right after Mubarak's speech. "I'm just extremely upset and frustrated and resentful about Mubarek -- even more so now than ever before," Badr says. Badr and his compatriots have been calling for Mubarak's resignation for more than two weeks. He had gathered with friends in Bellevue, who were all hoping for a celebratory meal. They watched the speech on their iPhones and laptops. Badr says hearing the news, they lost their appetite. So much hope has now turned to fear. He thinks the army might break into two factions: one that wants to protect the protestors and one against them. I don't know if that's a realistic fear - it's just one man's perspective - but I know NPR's foreign desk has been doing a great job covering these events. They pointed out this afternoon that everyone is required to serve Egypt's army, so it's different than our system in the U.S., and that the army is supposed to protect the state but not necessarily a specific regime. Badr says just recently he got a bunch of new pictures on his Facebook profile from the friends in Cairo that that he grew up with. He says the images paint a picture of Tahrir starting to feel like a big open air festival. But that's changed abruptly. "People have been putting on euphoric parades and comedy shows and concerts and making that reflects the mood of the demonstrators. And now, I'm definitely more concerned." Badr's the son of a diplomat and has lived all over the world. He settled in Issaquah a few years ago. I started talking with him a couple of weeks ago, after I saw a tweet about a support rally planned for Bellevue. Since then, he's led two weekend gatherings at Westlake Square. Badr says he's still planning to go to Cairo next week, to be in Tahrir Square.

Read More
http://www.kplu.org/term/other-news?page=86

Microsoft software salesman Alaa Badr is one of them.
I reached him this afternoon right after Mubarak's speech. "I'm just extremely upset and frustrated and resentful about Mubarek -- even more so now than ever before," Badr says. Badr and his compatriots have been calling for Mubarak's resignation for more than two weeks.

Read More

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