Adam Neder

Adam A. Neder

Professor at Whitworth College

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Location:
300 W Hawthorne Rd, Spokane, Washington, United States
HQ Phone:
(509) 777-1000

General Information

Education

Covenant

PhD  - 

Affiliations

Board Member  - TGE Southwind Conference

Recent News  

There's little doubt in my mind that a good portion, if not the entire problem of poverty, stems back to the first sin of Adam and Eve, a sin which could be characterized as a failure to live in gratitude for that which God has already given.
The second paper, also profound beyond my ability to summarize here, came from Dr. Adam Neder (Whitworth University). Neder's paper,"The Sun Behind the Clouds: Some Barthian Thoughts about Teaching Theology," sought to bring some of Barth's thoughts in ET to bear on the matter of theological pedagogy. As Neder introduced the paper, he noted that ET can be read as good news to the theological teacher, mainly, that theological work can be one of the most important tasks a human can be asked to do and when done properly is "pleasing to God and helpful to people. But ET is also a warning that when done badly, theological teaching can be "the most terrible thing on earth. ET, as Neder put it, can be read as if were an "MRI of a sick theologian which reveals that such a malady as vain theological teaching is not only serious and contagious, but deadly." Of course, this is so obvious that it almost needs no defence, yet as Neder pointed out, it sets before the theological teacher a serious conundrum: Whatever one does in the theological classroom will be meaningless if the Holy Spirit does not do his work, and yet, as the free Holy Spirit of God, there is nothing one can to do guarantee the Spirit's work. Neder began by pointing out how common it has become to assume that a classroom must be a place of safety for a student-a place where he or she can ask questions and not fear reprisal or ridicule. While that is a good philosophy as far as it goes, such a philosophy may lead a teacher to assume that when a student has enjoyed or felt safe in a class that it has therefore been successful. As Neder humorously put it, "If students are enjoying your classes, it may mean nothing more than that they are enjoying your classes! However, as he points out, such a safe environment of enjoyment may not be the best place of learning. Here Neder pointed out how Barth insisted that theological teachers must be ever aware that the teaching of the Gospel demands a confrontation and a decision, a space in which a personal response to GOD is required (not just a response or reiteration of the class material). Here Neder addressed the temptation to vanity that theologians face, and as he put it, theologians must learn ever anew that you cannot simultaneously win the praise of God and the praise of people-with the latter category uncomfortably indicated in in pursuit of top classroom evaluations, tenure, peer-reviewed articles, etc.

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There's little doubt in my mind that a good portion, if not the entire problem of poverty, stems back to the first sin of Adam and Eve, a sin which could be characterized as a failure to live in gratitude for that which God has already given.
The second paper, also profound beyond my ability to summarize here, came from Dr. Adam Neder (Whitworth University). Neder's paper,"The Sun Behind the Clouds: Some Barthian Thoughts about Teaching Theology," sought to bring some of Barth's thoughts in ET to bear on the matter of theological pedagogy. As Neder introduced the paper, he noted that ET can be read as good news to the theological teacher, mainly, that theological work can be one of the most important tasks a human can be asked to do and when done properly is "pleasing to God and helpful to people. But ET is also a warning that when done badly, theological teaching can be "the most terrible thing on earth. ET, as Neder put it, can be read as if were an "MRI of a sick theologian which reveals that such a malady as vain theological teaching is not only serious and contagious, but deadly." Of course, this is so obvious that it almost needs no defence, yet as Neder pointed out, it sets before the theological teacher a serious conundrum: Whatever one does in the theological classroom will be meaningless if the Holy Spirit does not do his work, and yet, as the free Holy Spirit of God, there is nothing one can to do guarantee the Spirit's work. Neder began by pointing out how common it has become to assume that a classroom must be a place of safety for a student-a place where he or she can ask questions and not fear reprisal or ridicule. While that is a good philosophy as far as it goes, such a philosophy may lead a teacher to assume that when a student has enjoyed or felt safe in a class that it has therefore been successful. As Neder humorously put it, "If students are enjoying your classes, it may mean nothing more than that they are enjoying your classes! However, as he points out, such a safe environment of enjoyment may not be the best place of learning. Here Neder pointed out how Barth insisted that theological teachers must be ever aware that the teaching of the Gospel demands a confrontation and a decision, a space in which a personal response to GOD is required (not just a response or reiteration of the class material). Here Neder addressed the temptation to vanity that theologians face, and as he put it, theologians must learn ever anew that you cannot simultaneously win the praise of God and the praise of people-with the latter category uncomfortably indicated in in pursuit of top classroom evaluations, tenure, peer-reviewed articles, etc.

Read More

There’s little doubt in my mind that a good portion, if not the entire problem of poverty, stems back to the first sin of Adam and Eve, a sin which could be characterized as a failure to live in gratitude for that which God has already given.
The second paper, also profound beyond my ability to summarize here, came from Dr. Adam Neder (Whitworth University). Neder's paper,"The Sun Behind the Clouds: Some Barthian Thoughts about Teaching Theology," sought to bring some of  Barth's thoughts in ET to bear on the matter of theological pedagogy. As Neder introduced the paper, he noted that ET can be read as good news to the theological teacher, mainly, that theological work can be one of the most important tasks a human can be asked to do and when done properly is "pleasing to God and helpful to people. But ET is also a warning that when done badly, theological teaching  can be "the most terrible thing on earth.  ET, as Neder put it, can be read as if were an "MRI of a sick theologian which reveals that such a malady as vain theological teaching is not only serious and contagious, but deadly." Of course, this is so obvious that it almost needs no defence, yet as Neder pointed out, it sets before the theological teacher a serious conundrum: Whatever one does in the theological classroom will be meaningless if the Holy Spirit does not do his work, and yet, as the free Holy Spirit of God, there is nothing one can to do guarantee the Spirit's work. Neder began by pointing out how common it has become to assume that a classroom must be a place of safety for a student-a place where he or she can ask questions and not fear reprisal or ridicule. While that is a good philosophy as far as it goes, such a philosophy may lead a teacher to assume that when a student has enjoyed or felt safe in a class that it has therefore been successful. As Neder humorously put it, "If students are enjoying your classes, it may mean nothing more than that they are enjoying your classes! However, as he points out, such a safe environment of enjoyment may not be the best place of learning. Here Neder pointed out how Barth insisted that theological teachers must be ever aware that the teaching of the Gospel demands a confrontation and a decision, a space in which a personal response to GOD is required (not just a response or reiteration of the class material). Here Neder addressed the temptation to vanity that theologians face, and as he put it, theologians must learn ever anew that you cannot simultaneously win the praise of God and the praise of people-with the latter category uncomfortably indicated in in pursuit of top classroom evaluations, tenure, peer-reviewed articles, etc.

Read More

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