Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 3/8/12  and contains information from public web pages.

Captain Brian J. Udell

Wrong Captain Brian J. Udell?

Pilot

Phone: (214) ***-****  HQ Phone
Southwest Airlines Co.
2702 Love Field Dr.
Dallas , Texas 75235
United States

Company Description: Southwest Airlines Co. (Southwest) is a passenger airline that provides scheduled air transportation in the United States. As of December 31, 2007, the Company...   more
Background

Employment History

  • Captain
45 Total References
Web References
It is not my story, but ...
www.naeda.com, 8 Mar 2012 [cached]
It is not my story, but one of Air Force Captain Brian Udell, or "Noodle" as his friends call him. It is a story of "Desire," "Determination" and "Discipline"-one of facing and overcoming extreme obstacles.
Brian began flying at age 9 and took his first cross-country flight at 10. He was one of only 60 candidates across the United States selected to attend the Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program. Brian graduated No. 1 in his class and was awarded the Air Training Command-Commanders Cup Trophy. He was one of the first lieutenants selected to fly the F-15E Strike Eagle.
During his career, Brian has accumulated over 9,000 hours in a variety of both civilian and military aircraft, including missions in Southeast Asia and Iraq. So, one might conclude that Brian Udell is a well-trained, excellent pilot.
On February 21, 1995, Captain Udell was conducting a routine training flight about 65 miles off the North Carolina coast over the Atlantic Ocean. Partway through the flight, while making a banking maneuver, something happened to the computer system that caused the plane to lose altitude rapidly and accelerate at the same time. The plane descended from approximately 30,000 feet to 1,500 feet in a matter of a few seconds. It also accelerated from 400 mph to 800 mph. After trying to regain control of the aircraft, the only option left was to eject, so that is what Brian and his co-pilot did-the co-pilot at approximately 10,000 feet and Brian at around 1,500 feet. Tragically, his partner did not survive.
...
Brian was able to inflate a small rubber life raft during the descent into the 60° water of the ocean using his one good arm with three operating fingers. He hit the water, submerged 10 feet under and the raft pulled him to the surface. His life vest was also torn to shreds during the ejection. Five-foot seas and 15 mph winds faced him once reaching the surface.
Bobbing in the ocean, he now had to figure out how to hoist his badly-damaged body onto the raft or face possibly being a meal for a shark. Following several attempts, he finally turned to his faith in God and prayer. When he was down to only enough strength for one more attempt, miraculously he made it onto the raft.
Most of the survival equipment either did not survive the ejection and was lost or was nonfunctional. After nearly four grueling hours in the cold Atlantic, he heard the sound of a Coast Guard C-130 plane and a helicopter. He could not operate the flares since it required two hands and he only had the use of one. A small radio was his last hope, but it did not appear to be working at first. Again, with one final attempt and through sheer faith and determination, the message was acknowledged. Brian then had to guide the rescuers in near his position, but not too close with the helicopter or it would toss him from the raft and he would ultimately drown.
Once rescued it was off to a hospital. No drugs or pain killers could be administered for hours after his arrival since they needed to know where he was experiencing pain as the medical team attempted to reset legs, arms and generally reconstruct his body parts.
Several weeks and several operations later, doctors told Brian that he would never be able to walk normally and that he would never be a pilot again. But this is just one more indication of how strong his will was to not only survive but also to return to a normal functioning life. Within two months after the titanium rods were removed from his legs, Brian was walking again. And, after another four months, he climbed into an F-15E and took off down the runway.
Today, Brian Udell is a pilot for Southwest Airlines. He is a shining example of someone who kept his cool during extreme circumstances. He had the Desire to survive, the Determination to return to a normal life and the Discipline, coupled with his faith, to use his training and skills in a way that allowed him to meet his ultimate goal of survival, by staying focused and breaking the big goal down into manageable pieces and applying his wisdom and knowledge to the task at hand. Part of his unrelenting willpower and courage also had a lot to do with his wife being four months pregnant with their first child!
What can we all learn from Brian and his horrific experience? It is not the situation we find ourselves in that determines the outcome, but how we handle that situation. If faced with what seems to be an insurmountable challenge, we are best served by staying focused on what is most important at that time... and never giving up.
Finally, although I'm sure there are other lessons to garner, the one that was most poignant for me. If I am having a so-called "bad day," I will think of Brian Udell, the only person to survive the highest speed ejection from a U.S. fighter aircraft to put it all in better perspective... And That's The Way I See It!
...
I find Captain Brian Udell to be a courageous person. I am sure there wasn't much time to think. I believe the changing moment was when he turned to God and prayer.
It is not my story, but ...
www.naeda.com, 6 Mar 2012 [cached]
It is not my story, but one of Air Force Captain Brian Udell, or "Noodle" as his friends call him. It is a story of "Desire," "Determination" and "Discipline"-one of facing and overcoming extreme obstacles.
Brian began flying at age 9 and took his first cross-country flight at 10. He was one of only 60 candidates across the United States selected to attend the Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program. Brian graduated No. 1 in his class and was awarded the Air Training Command-Commanders Cup Trophy. He was one of the first lieutenants selected to fly the F-15E Strike Eagle.
During his career, Brian has accumulated over 9,000 hours in a variety of both civilian and military aircraft, including missions in Southeast Asia and Iraq. So, one might conclude that Brian Udell is a well-trained, excellent pilot.
On February 21, 1995, Captain Udell was conducting a routine training flight about 65 miles off the North Carolina coast over the Atlantic Ocean. Partway through the flight, while making a banking maneuver, something happened to the computer system that caused the plane to lose altitude rapidly and accelerate at the same time. The plane descended from approximately 30,000 feet to 1,500 feet in a matter of a few seconds. It also accelerated from 400 mph to 800 mph. After trying to regain control of the aircraft, the only option left was to eject, so that is what Brian and his co-pilot did-the co-pilot at approximately 10,000 feet and Brian at around 1,500 feet. Tragically, his partner did not survive.
...
Brian was able to inflate a small rubber life raft during the descent into the 60° water of the ocean using his one good arm with three operating fingers. He hit the water, submerged 10 feet under and the raft pulled him to the surface. His life vest was also torn to shreds during the ejection. Five-foot seas and 15 mph winds faced him once reaching the surface.
Bobbing in the ocean, he now had to figure out how to hoist his badly-damaged body onto the raft or face possibly being a meal for a shark. Following several attempts, he finally turned to his faith in God and prayer. When he was down to only enough strength for one more attempt, miraculously he made it onto the raft.
Most of the survival equipment either did not survive the ejection and was lost or was nonfunctional. After nearly four grueling hours in the cold Atlantic, he heard the sound of a Coast Guard C-130 plane and a helicopter. He could not operate the flares since it required two hands and he only had the use of one. A small radio was his last hope, but it did not appear to be working at first. Again, with one final attempt and through sheer faith and determination, the message was acknowledged. Brian then had to guide the rescuers in near his position, but not too close with the helicopter or it would toss him from the raft and he would ultimately drown.
Once rescued it was off to a hospital. No drugs or pain killers could be administered for hours after his arrival since they needed to know where he was experiencing pain as the medical team attempted to reset legs, arms and generally reconstruct his body parts.
Several weeks and several operations later, doctors told Brian that he would never be able to walk normally and that he would never be a pilot again. But this is just one more indication of how strong his will was to not only survive but also to return to a normal functioning life. Within two months after the titanium rods were removed from his legs, Brian was walking again. And, after another four months, he climbed into an F-15E and took off down the runway.
Today, Brian Udell is a pilot for Southwest Airlines. He is a shining example of someone who kept his cool during extreme circumstances. He had the Desire to survive, the Determination to return to a normal life and the Discipline, coupled with his faith, to use his training and skills in a way that allowed him to meet his ultimate goal of survival, by staying focused and breaking the big goal down into manageable pieces and applying his wisdom and knowledge to the task at hand. Part of his unrelenting willpower and courage also had a lot to do with his wife being four months pregnant with their first child!
What can we all learn from Brian and his horrific experience? It is not the situation we find ourselves in that determines the outcome, but how we handle that situation. If faced with what seems to be an insurmountable challenge, we are best served by staying focused on what is most important at that time... and never giving up.
Finally, although I'm sure there are other lessons to garner, the one that was most poignant for me. If I am having a so-called "bad day," I will think of Brian Udell, the only person to survive the highest speed ejection from a U.S. fighter aircraft to put it all in better perspective... And That's The Way I See It!
North Dakota Housing Finance Agency
www.ndhfa.org, 9 Jan 2012 [cached]
The conference will begin on Wednesday morning with an interactive panel discussion with state legislators followed by inspirational speaker Captain Brian Udell.
Brian Udell is a very ...
www.ndscpa.org, 27 July 2010 [cached]
Brian Udell is a very accomplished aviator. He began flying at age nine and took his first cross-country flight at age ten. Since that time he has accumulated over 9000 hours in a variety of both civil and military aircraft. He was one of only sixty candidates across the United States selected to attend the Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program. Brian graduated number one in his class and was awarded the Air Training Command - Commanders Cup Trophy. Brian was one of the first Lieutenants selected to fly the F-15E Strike Eagle. He graduated from Strike Eagle training and received the top academic award. Brian went on to his operational unit where he became an Instructor, Mission Commander, and Air to Ground Top Gun winner. He has flown over 100 combat missions in Southwest Asia and logged nearly 2000 hours in the Strike Eagle. Brian received four Air Medals and three Aerial Achievement Medals for combat missions over the skies of Iraq. Brian's military career spanned ten years. Brian left the Air Force in 1999 and he is currently a pilot with Southwest Airlines and a speaker with The Aviation Speakers Bureau.
Captain Brian ...
www.pnbaa.org [cached]
Captain Brian Udell
Brian is a very accomplished aviator. He began flying at age nine and took his first cross-country flight at age ten. Since that time he has accumulated over 9000 hours in a variety of both civil and military aircraft. He was one of only sixty candidates across the United States selected to attend the Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training program. Brian graduated number one in his class and was awarded the Air Training Command - Commanders Cup Trophy. Brian was one of the first Lieutenants selected to fly the F-15E Strike Eagle. He graduated from Strike Eagle training and received the top academic award. Brian went on to his operational unit where he became an Instructor, Mission Commander, and Air to Ground Top Gun winner. He has flown over 100 combat missions in Southwest Asia and logged nearly 2000 hours in the Strike Eagle. Brian received four Air Medals and three Aerial Achievement Medals for combat missions over the skies of Iraq. Brian's military career spanned ten years. Brian left the Air Force in 1999 and he is currently a pilot with Southwest Airlines.
Hanging in the straps of his parachute and feeling the cold night air on his face, Brian Udell felt as if a freight train had collided with his body. As he struggled to inflate his life preserver before plunging into the icy waters of the Atlantic Ocean, he realized it had shredded with the force of the supersonic windblast. With his teeth and one functioning arm, Brian feverishly retrieved a one-man life raft that hung from a fifteen-foot lanyard off his right hip only seconds before entering the water. After popping back to the surface like a bobber on fishing line, the salt water made him painfully aware of the open wounds, cuts, and scrapes that were strewn over his broken body. The thought of blood pouring into the water inviting sharks for a late night meal motivated him to attempt to get into the partially inflated raft. As he kicked his legs, Brian's lower limbs felt as though only a thread attached them. Exhausted and unable to enter the raft thoughts of death quickly consumed his mind. Knowing he would be unable to survive the night under the extreme conditions, Brian began to pray. The next several hours of survival and the many months of excruciating rehabilitation deliver an almost unbelievable story. Brian holds the record for surviving the highest speed ejection from a U.S. Fighter Aircraft at nearly 800 M.P.H. He survived four grueling hours 65 miles off the Atlantic Coast in 60-degree water, 5-foot seas, and 15 M.P.H. winds at night.
Other People with the name "Udell":
Other ZoomInfo Searches
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.
zirhbt201304