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This profile was last updated on 12/7/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Research Scientist

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Phone: (306) ***-****  
Local Address: Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada
Agriculture
930 Carling Avenue
Ottawa , Ontario K1A 0C5
Canada

Company Description: AAFC creates many, many farm income programs. They always share the same broad purpose: to give financial assistance to producers. The target groups for the...   more
Background

Employment History

15 Total References
Web References
Even, shallow planting depth helps Saskatchewan farmers beat the fall frost - Reduced Tillage LINKAGES
www.reducedtillage.ca, 1 Feb 2007 [cached]
Crops seeded unevenly "are the worst," says Dr. Yantai Gan, a research scientist at the Agriculture Canada Research Station in Swift Current. Shallow seeded plants emerge several days faster and compete with the slower emerging, deep seeded plants for water, light and soil nutrients, reducing their yield by up to 50% or more. There can be 10 days between the first and last plants to emerge, which can be crucial in a frost year, he adds. Dr. Gan says frost or no frost, crops seeded shallow and uniform have a definite edge. They emerge more quickly and evenly, mature faster, and have higher yields. He led a three-year study that showed canola, mustard, and flax planted uniformly at ¾ of an inch in early May emerged 3 to 5 days faster than seeds planted at 2 inches and had yields up to 25 % higher.
...
Dr. Gan says it depends largely on the land, how evenly farmers distribute residue from last year's crop if they direct seed, and the depth control they achieve with their equipment.
Yantai Gan, a researcher at ...
www.topcropmanager.com, 17 May 2008 [cached]
Yantai Gan, a researcher at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, says that while seed size is a genetically controlled trait, the seed size distribution in the harvested seed lot is strongly influenced by several factors, including the growing season environment.To help guide chickpea growers on the best agronomic practices for growing bigger seed, he conducted a field experiment from 2004 to 2006 with plots located at Swift Current and Shaunavon, Saskatchewan.
"Yes, we know that seed size is partially determined by the variety, but for a given variety, we wanted to find out what the influence of different factors were on seed size," explains Gan.
...
However, Gan explains that this difference was mainly due to 2004 when the two stubble types were in adjacent fields.
"The year of 2004 was wet with growing season precipitation about 40 percent greater than normal and in that year we had a difference in seed size between barley and wheat stubble.The two stubble types were in separate, adjacent fields, though, but they had the same level of residual soil N and water.However, during the last two years (normal to dry years), the two stubble types were in the same field and we didn't see any difference.So, there is a need to determine whether the differences observed in 2004 were due to wet conditions or due to other factors.In general, I wouldn't be too concerned about wheat or barley stubble selection," explains Gan.
Boosting Durum Yield and Protein with Appropriate Crop Sequences
www.ssca.ca, 20 Sept 2006 [cached]
Dr. Yantai Gan
Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
ScienceAlert - Give peas a chance
sciencealert.com.au, 10 Nov 2004 [cached]
Dr Fucheng Shan of CLIMA, Dr Yantai Gan of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and Dr Heather Clarke of CLIMA inspect the progress of CLIMA’s chickpea breeding program at the University of Western Australia.
...
Australian growers should rotate new, alternative and traditional crops to improve their farming systems, according to Yantai Gan of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
,In Canada, there has been a rise in alternative crop plantings, such as legumes, to maximise profits from rotations, with field peas and lentils particularly increasing.
,In a rotation, I like lentils, but love chickpeas and therefore encourage WA growers to give peas a chance,, Dr Gan said.
At a recent Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture (CLIMA) seminar, he discussed agronomic management options to optimise pulse crop benefits in the farming system, such as improved rotations incorporating chickpeas.
,Canada,s chickpea industry was devastated by ascochyta blight in 2002 and breeding programs have not yet developed a robust variety.
,Australia too has suffered badly from ascochyta, with epidemics since 1997 damaging the industry and shattering grower confidence,, Dr Gan said.
Based on potential national chickpea plantings of 400,000 hectares at $400/ha, ascochyta resistant chickpeas could sustain a $160 million Australian industry.
In WA, chickpeas are an excellent option for the 70 per cent of growers who use rotational cropping systems.
Dr Gan is visiting CLIMA on behalf of the Canadian government to investigate opportunities for improving pulse-based cropping systems for western Canada, particularly CLIMA,s world leading chickpea research and breeding program.
,Chickpeas are an important part of a profitable rotation, however, like in Australia, ascochyta is currently making the crop too risky for Canadian growers.
,CLIMA,s chickpea breeding programs are producing varieties with useful ascochyta resistance, which are further advanced than Canada,s programs.
,While in Australia, we,re investigating ways to minimise ascochyta in Canada and looking for opportunities for Australia-Canada collaborations,, Dr Gan said.
Dr Gan, CLIMA Director Professor Kadambot Siddique and Bill McLeod of the WA Department of Agriculture are compiling a definitive review of integrated ascochyta management.
...
Dr Yantai Gan, gan@agr.gc.ca
Reduced Tillage LINKAGES - Killing Frost Teaches Valuable Lessons
www.reducedtillage.ca, 21 July 2004 [cached]
Crops seeded unevenly "are the worst," says Dr. Yantai Gan, a research scientist at the Agriculture Canada Research Station in Swift Current.Shallow seeded plants emerge several days faster and compete with the slower emerging, deep seeded plants for water, light and soil nutrients, reducing their yield by up to 50% or more.There can be 10 days between the first and last plants to emerge, which can be crucial in a frost year, he adds.
Dr. Gan says frost or no frost, crops seeded shallow and uniform have a definite edge.They emerge more quickly and evenly, mature faster, and have higher yields.He led a three-year study that showed canola, mustard, and flax planted uniformly at ¾ of an inch in early May emerged 3 to 5 days faster than seeds planted at 2 inches and had yields up to 25 % higher.
...
Dr. Gan says it depends largely on the land, how evenly farmers distribute residue from last year's crop if they direct seed, and the depth control they achieve with their equipment.
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