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Wrong Willy Burgdorfer?

Willy Burgdorfer

Researcher

Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

HQ Phone:  (970) 349-7231

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory

P.O. Box 519

Crested Butte, Colorado,81224

United States

Company Description

The Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory's mission is to advance the deep scientific understanding of nature that promotes informed stewardship of the Earth. We provide scientists and students access to diverse habitats, research and education infrastructure...more

Web References(165 Total References)


History of Lyme Disease | Nardella Clinic

www.nardellaclinic.com [cached]

At the same time Willy Burgdorfer, a researcher at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, was studying and examining ticks from New York when he noticed a spirochete that he had never seen before.
He checked the rest of the ticks he had on hand, and found that 60% of them carried the organism. Burgdorfer had been trained in Europe, where the link between a spirochete and the bull's-eye rash had been hypothesized, so he chased the lead by obtaining more ticks and some blood samples from people diagnosed with Lyme disease. Eventually he isolated the spirochete in Lyme disease sufferers and published his findings, earning him the honor of having his discovery named after him: Borrelia Burgdorferi.


History of Lyme Disease | The Nardella Clinic

nardellaclinic.com [cached]

At the same time Willy Burgdorfer, a researcher at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, was studying and examining ticks from New York when he noticed a spirochete that he had never seen before.
He checked the rest of the ticks he had on hand, and found that 60% of them carried the organism. Burgdorfer had been trained in Europe, where the link between a spirochete and the bullseye rash had been hypothesized, so he chased the lead by obtaining more ticks and some blood samples from people diagnosed with Lyme disease. Eventually he isolated the spirochete in Lyme sufferers and published his findings, earning him the honour of having his discovery named after him: Borellia Burgdorferi.


billingsgazette.com

Willy Burgdorfer
HAMILTON - To the world, Willy Burgdorfer will always be remembered as the scientist who discovered the cause of Lyme disease. In Hamilton, the former Rocky Mountain Laboratories scientist will be remembered as a patient and kind mentor to the researchers who followed in his footsteps, as well as a community member always willing to share his time through the Kiwanis and his church. Burgdorfer died in Hamilton on Monday at the age of 89. Born and educated in Switzerland, Burgdorfer joined the RML research team in Hamilton in 1951. Over a career that spanned 35 years, he studied a variety of tick-borne disease agents and authored more than 200 scientific publications. On the other side of the country at the Hamilton laboratory, Burgdorfer was working to help a fellow researcher find the cause of an outbreak of a totally different tick-borne disease called spotted fever that had occurred in New York in the early 1970s. While studying deer ticks sent from New York in hopes of uncovering the cause of the spotted fever outbreak, Burgdorfer found the long, coiled microorganisms called spirochetes that would prove to be the cause of Lyme disease. The spirochete was later named Borrelia burgdorferi in honor of Burgdorfer. *** Retired RML researcher and friend Tom Schwan said Burgdorfer would call his most famous discovery "serendipity." That discovery - which was made while looking for something totally different - is a testament to Burgdorfer's abilities as an "outstanding scientist," Schwan said. Schwan first met Burgdorfer in 1983 when the RML scientist was speaking at the first international conference on Lyme disease at Yale. In 1986, Burgdorfer was on the team who interviewed Schwan for a job at RML. It was the same year that Burgdorfer retired. Burgdorfer was provided emeritus status at the laboratory following his retirement and continued to work with many of the young up-and-coming scientists there. Burgdorfer also made sure that his young colleague found time to be part of his community. Burgdorfer was very active in that organization and was instrumental in helping it form a youth soccer program that's still active today. "He had a great career," he said. "It's always been nice to know that Willy is just down the street. Lyme Disease, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Willy Burgdorfer


lymediseaseresource.com

In 1982, researcher Willy Burgdorfer, a researcher and expert in spirochetal diseases at Rocky Mountain Laboratories (RML) in Hamilton, Montana, along with his colleague Alan Barbour, M.D. from the University of Texas Health Science Center.
In examining the ticks for rickettsiae (the bacteria that causes Rocky Mountain Fever), Burgdorfer noticed "poorly stained, rather long, irregularly coiled spirochetes. Further examination revealed spirochetes in 60% of the ticks. Dr. Burgdorfer and Dr. Barbour continued to study this spiral-shaped bacteria, or spirochete, from infected deer ticks, and in November 1981, the two scientists discovered that the spirochete caused both the symptoms of Lyme disease and the strange bulls-eye rash called erythema migrans (EM). The spirochete was later named Borrelia burgdorferi in honor of Dr. Burgdorfer's role in its discovery. Dr. Willy Burgdorfer is an American scientist born in 1932 and educated in Basel, Switzerland, considered an international leader in the field of medical entomology. He discovered the bacterial pathogen that causes Lyme disease, a spirochete named Borrelia burgdorferi in his honor. Dr. Burgdorfer earned his Ph.D. in zoology, parasitology, and bacteriology from the University and from the Swiss Tropical Institute in Basel. As a research subject for his thesis he chose to study the development of the African relapsing fever spirochete, Borrelia duttonii in its tick vector Ornitnodoros moubata, and to evaluate this tick's efficiency in transmitting spirochetes during feeding on animal hosts. During his college years he was a member of a research team investigating outbreaks of Q fever in various parts of Switzerland and became interested in similar research activities carried out at the Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) in Hamilton, Montana, a U.S. National Institutes of Health research facility. He joined RML in 1952 as a Research Fellow, and later became a Research Associate in the USPHS's Visiting Scientist Program. In 1957, he became a U.S. citizen and shortly thereafter joined the RML staff as a Medical Entomologist. Dr. Burgdorfer's research concerned the interactions between animal and human disease agents and their transmitting arthropod vectors, particularly ticks, fleas and mosquitoes. His research contributions are published in more than 225 papers and books, and cover a wide field of investigations including those on relapsing fevers, plague, tularemia, Colorado tick fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other bacterial and viral diseases. Dr. Burgdorfer gained worldwide recognition for his 1982 discovery of a tick-borne spirochete as the long-sought cause of Lyme disease and related disorders in the U.S. and Europe. The agent was named after him - Borrelia burgdorferi. Throughout his career, Dr. Burgdorfer participated in a number of World Health Organization (WHO) and other health organization-sponsored seminars and congresses. From 1967-1972, he served as Associate Member on the Rickettsial Commission of the Armed Forces Epidemiology Board. For several years (1968-1971) he was also Co-Project Officer of the PL 480-sponsored Research Project on Rickettsial Zoonoses in Egypt and adjacent areas, and from 1979 to 1986, he directed the WHO-sponsored Reference Center for Rickettsial Diseases at RML in Montana, U.S. Although retired since 1986, Dr. Burgdorfer continues his association with the Rocky Mountain Laboratories' Laboratory of Human Bacterial Pathogenesis as Scientist Emeritus. He is also active on the Scientific/Medical Advisory Committee of the Lyme Disease Foundation. In 1999, he delivered the keynote address at the 12th International Conference on Lyme Disease and Other Spirochetal and Tick-Borne Disorders. This entry was posted in Ask the Doctor, Chronic Lyme Disease, Coping with Lyme disease, Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, Discussion, General, Lyme Disease News, Lyme Disease Symptoms, Lyme Stories, medical controversies and tagged Dr. Willy Burgdorfer, lyme disease. Bookmark the permalink.


ASTMH | ACME

www.astmh.org [cached]

Willy Burgdorfer, 2010
Rocky Mountain Lab


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