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This profile was last updated on 8/6/13  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. William E. Stein

Wrong Dr. William E. Stein?

Associate Professor of Biological...

Phone: (607) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: s***@***.edu
Binghamton University
Africa House 50 Washington Avenue
Endicott, New York 13760
United States

Company Description: Binghamton University is one of the four university centers of the State University of New York. Known for the excellence of its students, faculty, staff and...   more
Background

Employment History

27 Total References
Web References
"It was like discovering the botanical ...
www.newswise.com, 1 Mar 2012 [cached]
"It was like discovering the botanical equivalent of dinosaur footprints," said Dr. William Stein, associate professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University, and one of the article's authors.
...
Stein, Mannolini, Hernick, and Dr. Christopher M. Berry, a paleobotany lecturer at Cardiff University in Wales, co-authored a Nature article reporting that discovery, as well as the most recent one.
...
Working in conjunction with Stein, Mannolini also developed a sketch of the ancient forest.
...
Following the discovery of the tree's crown, a thorough investigation was conducted by Stein and Dr. Christopher M. Berry, a paleobotany lecturer at Cardiff University in Wales and the other co-author of both Nature articles.
...
The first glimpse of the unexpected complexity of this ancient forest came when Stein, Berry, Hernick and Mannolini found the remains of large scrambling tree-sized plants, identified as aneurophytaleans.
...
"Trees probably changed everything," said Stein. "Not only did these emerging forests likely cause important changes in global patterns of sedimentation, but they may have triggered a major extinction in fossil record."
For Stein, it all comes down to one thing - how much we don't know but need to understand about our ancient past. "The complexity of the Gilboa site can teach us a lot about the original assembly of our modern day ecosystems," said Stein.
...
Professor William Stein of Binghamton University discusses how piecing together a view of this ancient site, dating back about 385 million years ago, could shed new light on the role of modern-day forests and their impact on climate change.
"The basic point of this paper ...
www.sciam.com, 18 April 2007 [cached]
"The basic point of this paper is, well, two things," says lead author William Stein, a biologist at the Binghamton University in New York State."We now have clear evidence what these stumps really were," part of the class Cladoxylopsida believed to be related to modern-day ferns, and we also have "real strong evidence of the morphology of these forms."
From the fossil reconstruction, the team of scientists determined that a tree comprising all these parts could grow about 30 feet tall.According to Stein, the base would have been massive,on the order of 2.5 feet in diameter,with a large, single trunk and longitudinal ridges (probably part of the tree's vascular system), topped by a leafless crown of a material resembling fronds on ferns and palms.
...
Stein says the team is "sticking with just the genus," as far as classification goes, because "we can't distinguish species from genera with the fragments we have."
By piecing together the fragments, the team was able to get an idea of what a forest ecosystem might have looked like 360 million years ago.Stein estimates these Wattieza trees would have been "fairly closely spaced," about three to 16 feet apart, and that they would have dropped a load of litter from their branches onto the forest floor.
Scientists imagined they were big, but ...
www.louis-j-sheehan.com [cached]
Scientists imagined they were big, but not that big, says William Stein, paleobotanist at Binghamton University in upstate New York.At 26 feet, the fossilized trunk was three times taller than any known plant from the period."We all have to be amazed with the scale of these things," Stein says.Size has not been the only surprise.The type of plant it wasâ€"more tree fern than coniferâ€"forces a major rethinking of "how modern-scale forests actually came into being," says Stein."Here we have a plant that's big and it's producing a ton of [leaf] litter."Dominant plants like Wattieza set the tone for an ecosystem during the Devonian period, which is when Earth's modern ecology was formed, Stein says.
"It was like discovering the botanical ...
www.eurekalert.org, 29 Feb 2012 [cached]
"It was like discovering the botanical equivalent of dinosaur footprints," said William Stein, associate professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University, and one of the article's authors.
...
Stein, Mannolini, Hernick, and Dr. Christopher M. Berry, a paleobotany lecturer at Cardiff University in Wales, co-authored a Nature article reporting that discovery, as well as the most recent one.
...
Working in conjunction with Stein, Mannolini also developed a sketch of the ancient forest.
...
IMAGE: Working in conjunction with William Stein at Binghamton University, Frank Mannolini of the New York State Museum developed a sketch of what the Gilboa forest site might have looked like...
...
Following the discovery of the tree's crown, a thorough investigation was conducted by Stein and Christopher M. Berry, a paleobotany lecturer at Cardiff University in Wales and the other co-author of both Nature articles.
...
The first glimpse of the unexpected complexity of this ancient forest came when Stein, Berry, Hernick and Mannolini found the remains of large scrambling tree-sized plants, identified as aneurophytaleans.
...
IMAGE: William Stein, associate professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University, carefully places one of the world's oldest trees in the University's greenhouse. Click here for more information.
...
"Trees probably changed everything," said Stein. "Not only did these emerging forests likely cause important changes in global patterns of sedimentation, but they may have triggered a major extinction in fossil record."
For Stein, it all comes down to one thing - how much we don't know but need to understand about our ancient past. "The complexity of the Gilboa site can teach us a lot about the original assembly of our modern day ecosystems," said Stein.
William Stein, associate ...
www.sushituesday.com, 23 April 2007 [cached]
William Stein, associate professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University, and colleagues at the New York State Museum in Albany, NY, and Cardiff University in the United Kingdom, have found new evidence related to the Earth's earliest forests, putting to rest some speculation as to what trees might have looked like millions of years ago.
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