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Wrong William Hamman?

William Hamman

Research Scientist

Western Michigan University

HQ Phone:  (269) 387-1000

Direct Phone: (269) ***-****direct phone

Email: w***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Western Michigan University

1903 West Michigan Avenue

Kalamazoo, Michigan,49008

United States

Company Description

Ranked No. 1 in undergraduate supply chain education by Gartner, WMU's Integrated Supply Management (ISM) program has been recognized nationally by several organizations and publications for its leadership in preparing students for careers in supply chain mana...more

Background Information

Employment History

Captain

United Air Lines Inc


Position, Development

NASA


Affiliations

World Congress

Advisory Board Member


The National Association of State Medicaid

Board Member


OtterBase Inc

Founder


Education

MD

Western Michigan University


MPH


associate's degree


bachelor of science degree

Purdue University


medical and doctoral degrees

University of Wisconsin-Madison


Web References(165 Total References)


www.wrldhealthcare.com

William Hamman
William Hamman, MD, PhD Captain, United Airlines; Co-Director, College of Aviation, Center of Excellence for Simulation Research, Western Michigan University


www.beaumonthospitals.com

William Hamman, M.D., Ph.D
Hamman, M.D., Ph.D, serves as the Director of Medical Simulation & Research in the Surgical Learning Center. Dr. Hamman is an internationally recognized authority in the area of team-based performance enhancement and specifically the use of in situ simulation to improve human performance in high risk team-centered health care environments. With thirty years of experience as an international airline pilot for United Airlines and fifteen years as a clinician in cardiology, Dr. Hamman joins us from Western Michigan University's College of Aviation where he was a research scientist and the Director of the Center for Human Performance and Simulation. He has made significant contributions in raising standards in both the airline and healthcare industries by establishing risk assessment and human performance improvement programs through the use of simulation. While working for United Airlines, Dr. Hamman held the position of Manager of Human Factors and Risk Assessment. He also contributed to the development of team training for flight crews in the Advanced Qualification Program (AQP) as well as sat on various focus groups for the Air Transport Association, Airline Pilot Association, and NASA.


www.accuscreen.com [cached]

As a cardiologist and United Airlines captain, William Hamman taught doctors and pilots ways to keep hearts and planes from crashing.
He shared millions in grants, had university and hospital posts, and bragged of work for prestigious medical groups. An Associated Press story featured him leading a teamwork training session at an American College of Cardiology convention last spring. But it turns out Hamman isn't a cardiologist or even a doctor. The AP found he had no medical residency, fellowship, doctoral degree or the 15 years of clinical experience he claimed. He attended medical school for a few years, but withdrew and didn't graduate. His pilot qualifications do not appear to be in question - he holds the highest type of license a pilot can have, a Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said. However, United grounded him in August after his medical and doctoral degrees evaporated like contrails of the jets he flew. He resigned in June as an educator and researcher at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., after a credentials check revealed discrepancies, a hospital spokeswoman said. Doctors who worked with the 58-year-old pilot are stunned, not just at the ruse and how long it lasted, but also because many of them valued his work and were sad to see it end. "I was shocked to hear the news," said Dr. W. Douglas Weaver, who was president of the cardiology group when it gave Hamman a training contract for up to $250,000 plus travel a few years ago. Now, groups that Hamman worked for are red-faced that they hadn't checked out the tall, sandy-haired man who impressed many with his commanding manner and simple insights like not taking your eyes off a patient while talking with other team members about what to do. Hamman did not return several phone calls and e-mails seeking comment. "It's Mr. Hamman's desire that he clear up any misconceptions about his background that he has caused. Hamman does have an associate's degree in general aviation flight technology and a bachelor of science degree from Purdue University. He also has "type ratings" to fly half a dozen very large commercial planes, according to the FAA. United would not discuss his job history, citing employee confidentiality. But the company confirmed that he is not currently authorized to fly. Hamman lives in Michigan and is based in Chicago. As long ago as 1992, an FAA workshop listed Hamman as an M.D. from United's flight center in Denver. In an interview last year with Cath Lab Digest, a publication for heart specialists, Hamman says that being a doctor may have "opened up some doors at United, and I ended up as manager of quality and risk assessment." In 2004, he joined Western Michigan University, a Kalamazoo school with a big aviation program in nearby Battle Creek, as co-director of its Center of Excellence for Simulation Research. After fessing up, Hamman asked the AMA and the cardiology group to let him continue, saying, "The work is the work." Tags: background check services, fake doctor, impostor doctor, William Hamman


sprintpcs.earthlink.net

As a cardiologist and United Airlines captain, William Hamman taught doctors and...">
As a cardiologist and United Airlines captain, William Hamman taught doctors and pilots ways to keep hearts and planes from crashing. He shared millions in grants, had university and hospital posts, and bragged of work for prestigious medical groups. An Associated Press story featured him leading a teamwork training session at an American College of Cardiology convention last spring. But it turns out Hamman isn't a cardiologist or even a doctor. The AP found he had no medical residency, fellowship, doctoral degree or the 15 years of clinical experience he claimed. He attended medical school for a few years but withdrew and didn't graduate. His pilot qualifications do not appear to be in question - he holds the highest type of license a pilot can have, a Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said. However, United grounded him in August after his medical and doctoral degrees evaporated like contrails of the jets he flew. He resigned in June as an educator and researcher at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., after a credentials check revealed discrepancies, a hospital spokeswoman said. Doctors who worked with the 58-year-old pilot are stunned, not just at the ruse and how long it lasted, but also because many of them valued his work and were sad to see it end. "I was shocked to hear the news," said Dr. W. Douglas Weaver, who was president of the cardiology group when it gave Hamman a training contract for up to $250,000 plus travel a few years ago. Now, groups that Hamman worked for are red-faced that they hadn't checked out the tall, sandy-haired man who impressed many with his commanding manner and simple insights like not taking your eyes off a patient while talking with other team members about what to do. Hamman did not return several phone calls and e-mails seeking comment. "It's Mr. Hamman's desire that he clear up any misconceptions about his background that he has caused. Hamman does have an associate's degree in general aviation flight technology and a bachelor of science degree from Purdue University. He also has "type ratings" to fly half a dozen very large commercial planes, according to the FAA. United would not discuss his job history, citing employee confidentiality. But the company confirmed that he is not currently authorized to fly. Hamman lives in Michigan and is based in Chicago. As long ago as 1992, an FAA workshop listed Hamman as an M.D. from United's flight center in Denver. In an interview last year with Cath Lab Digest, a publication for heart specialists, Hamman says that being a doctor may have "opened up some doors at United, and I ended up as manager of quality and risk assessment." In 2004, he joined Western Michigan University, a Kalamazoo school with a big aviation program in nearby Battle Creek, as co-director of its Center of Excellence for Simulation Research. Hamman resigned June 15. After fessing up, Hamman asked the AMA and the cardiology group to let him continue, saying, "the work is the work."


www.accuscreen.com [cached]

As a cardiologist and United Airlines captain, William Hamman taught doctors and pilots ways to keep hearts and planes from crashing.
He shared millions in grants, had university and hospital posts, and bragged of work for prestigious medical groups. An Associated Press story featured him leading a teamwork training session at an American College of Cardiology convention last spring. But it turns out Hamman isn’t a cardiologist or even a doctor. The AP found he had no medical residency, fellowship, doctoral degree or the 15 years of clinical experience he claimed. He attended medical school for a few years, but withdrew and didn’t graduate. His pilot qualifications do not appear to be in question â€" he holds the highest type of license a pilot can have, a Federal Aviation Administration spokeswoman said. However, United grounded him in August after his medical and doctoral degrees evaporated like contrails of the jets he flew. He resigned in June as an educator and researcher at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., after a credentials check revealed discrepancies, a hospital spokeswoman said. Now, groups that Hamman worked for are red-faced that they hadn’t checked out the tall, sandy-haired man who impressed many with his commanding manner and simple insights like not taking your eyes off a patient while talking with other team members about what to do. Hamman did not return several phone calls and e-mails seeking comment. Hamman does have an associate’s degree in general aviation flight technology and a bachelor of science degree from Purdue University. He also has “type ratings†to fly half a dozen very large commercial planes, according to the FAA. United would not discuss his job history, citing employee confidentiality. But the company confirmed that he is not currently authorized to fly. Hamman lives in Michigan and is based in Chicago. As long ago as 1992, an FAA workshop listed Hamman as an M.D. from United’s flight center in Denver. In an interview last year with Cath Lab Digest, a publication for heart specialists, Hamman says that being a doctor may have “opened up some doors at United, and I ended up as manager of quality and risk assessment.†In 2004, he joined Western Michigan University, a Kalamazoo school with a big aviation program in nearby Battle Creek, as co-director of its Center of Excellence for Simulation Research. After fessing up, Hamman asked the AMA and the cardiology group to let him continue, saying, “The work is the work.â€


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