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2016-05-01T00:00:00.000Z

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Garrison

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Web References (68 Total References)


Who Is "Willie O'Keefe"? Oliver Stone's JFK: The JFK 100: JFK assassination investigation: Jim Garrison New Orleans investigation of the John F. Kennedy assassination: david, ferrie, dave, david ferrie, dave ferrie, ferry, david ferry, dave ferry, fairy,

www.jfk-online.com [cached]

Garrison aide William Gurvich was present when Phelan confronted Sciambra and Garrison.

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"Man, you have just blown up the only witness we've got," Gurvich told Phelan afterwards.


JFK: Who's Who in the Jim Garrison Case: New Orleans investigation of the JFK assassination: Prosecution of Clay Shaw for conspiracy to assassinate President John F. Kennedy with David Ferrie and Lee Harvey Oswald,

www.jfk-online.com [cached]

Louis Ivon and William Gurvich

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Bill Gurvich (above right) was a DA's Office investigator who resigned his position in June 1967 and went public with his belief that Garrison's case against Clay Shaw was a fraud.


Jim Garrison Interrogates Clay Shaw: Oliver Stone's JFK: The JFK 100: JFK assassination investigation: Jim Garrison New Orleans investigation of the John F. Kennedy assassination

www.jfk-online.com [cached]

The statement was read by William Gurvich, a chief investigator on Garrison's staff who later defected, even going so far as to appeal to Robert Kennedy to aid in calling a halt, and later appearing before the grand jury under oath.

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At the time of the arrest, however, on behalf of the District Attorney, Gurvich read the formal statement which avoided any specific link of evidence, bluntly saying, "Mr.


John F. Kennedy assassination: profile of Clay Shaw, alleged conspirator in assassination of JFK

www.jfk-online.com [cached]

The statement was read by William Gurvich, a chief investigator on Garrison's staff who later defected, even going so far as to appeal to Robert Kennedy to aid in calling a halt, and later appearing before the grand jury under oath.

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At the time of the arrest, however, on behalf of the District Attorney, Gurvich read the formal statement which avoided any specific link of evidence, bluntly saying, "Mr.


Jim Garrison Lied About William Gurvich

prouty.jfkassassination.net [cached]

Jim Garrison lied about the defection of Bill Gurvich

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Concealing William Gurvich's Role
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Buried in a footnote is Garrison's observation, "One [lie] that my staff particularly enjoyed was the network's solemn description of one of its witnesses, William Gurvich, as 'the Chief Investigator of the District Attorney's office.' (4) A private detective, Gurvich had volunteered to help the investigation but had disappeared from the office months before.
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There is no evidence that William Gurvich ever had the official title "Chief Investigator" — but also no evidence that he ever claimed such a title for himself. However Gurvich had indeed "served as one of Garrison's chief aides for six months, handling interrogations and extraterritorial aspects of the investigation. (6) As author Patricia Lambert succinctly observes, William Gurvich was repeatedly referred to as Garrison's "chief" investigator by the press during his six months with the DA's office, he was treated as such by Garrison, and he was identified as Garrison's "chief investigative aide" in the earliest book on the case, Plot or Politics? by Rosemary James and Jack Wardlaw. (7)
Two key sources on Gurvich are:
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The fact that the press repeatedly referred to him this way reflects something obvious to the reporters following the story: Gurvich was in a central and key role.
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As Lambert notes, Gurvich was one of the select six investigators who received copies of the DA's "master file" on the JFK investigation. He had been given "a full set of keys" to the district attorney's office, had been allowed the use of Garrison's car, and "shared" Garrison's desk. (8) When Garrison held the first press conference on his JFK probe in February 1967, William Gurvich — described by Big Jim as an "extremely competent private detective" — was the only aide singled out by name in DA's the statement describing his JFK task force. (9)
Garrison is also being blatantly disingenuous when he states that Gurvich was never a "regular investigator" of the NODA. Gurvich, one of three owner-operators of New Orleans' prestigious Gurvich Detective Agency, was a private detective respected both nationally and internationally, who donated his time and resources to the District Attorney's office for a token fee of a dollar a year. (10)
Most obviously, Gurvich did anything but "disappear" from the DA's office. He remained a member of the DA's staff even after the June 19, 1967, NBC broadcast. (11) He soon resigned, however, and went public with his belief that Garrison's investigation, and, in particular, the prosecution of Clay Shaw, had "no basis in fact. (12)
Prior to his resignation, Gurvich met with Senator Robert F. Kennedy in Washington and told him, "Senator, Mr. Garrison will never shed any light on your brother's death.
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Despite Garrison's attempt to downplay the episode in his book,(15) the loss of Gurvich and the ensuing publicity came as a terrible blow. (16) Stung by Gurvich's defection, Garrison quickly drafted a press release, stating, "I am sure that almost everyone will recognize Mr. Gurvich's statement as the latest move from the eastern headquarters of the establishment to attempt to discredit our investigation into the true facts of the Kennedy assassination. (17) Garrison also falsely claimed that "Mr. Gurvich's role in the investigation was principally concerned with regard to photographic work . . . He was assigned to a limited amount of investigative work. (18)
From the time Gurvich came aboard in December 1966, he had played a major role in investigating two of the DA's key suspects, David Ferrie and Sergio Arcacha Smith. For example, as Patricia Lambert states, "William Gurvich was given the job of proving that on the day of the assassination David Ferrie was in Dallas, sitting in a plane at the end of a runway, engines running, waiting to fly Oswald to safety.
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Gurvich was supposed to find the airfield. A pilot himself, Gurvich rented a plane and flew from one small field to another, examining records, talking to workers, and showing Ferrie's picture.
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When Garrison focused on a tiny airport called White Rock (where a mechanic said maybe Ferrie looked familiar),(20) "Gurvich obtained its gasoline receipts for September, October, and November — 4,000 of them, which Garrison ordered photocopied and checked," writes Lambert.
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In January 1967, it was William Gurvich who flew to Dallas and located Sergio Arcacha Smith, and attempted to interview him on behalf of the NODA. (22)
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When Garrison became curious about the July 31, 1963, seizure of a cache of arms in nearby St. Tammany Parish, north of Lake Pontchartrain, it was William Gurvich who investigated the incident. (23) Along with Assistant DA Alvin Oser, Gurvich also investigated an anti-Castro activist training camp that had briefly been active in St. Tammany Parish in the summer of 1963. (24) It was Gurvich who flew to Houston and located Ricardo Davis, one of the organizers of the training camp. (25) Garrison would always maintain that the 1963 goings-on by Lake Pontchartrain were highly relevant to the death of John F. Kennedy. (26)
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On March 1, Gurvich was privy to Garrison's decision to arrest Clay Shaw, and it was Gurvich who announced Shaw's arrest to the media. (27) Garrison subsequently sent Gurvich to San Francisco to check Clay Shaw's 1963 hotel records and conduct research on "gay hangouts" in that city. (28) The following week, Gurvich participated in Clay Shaw's preliminary hearing and was one of three NODA investigators who interviewed key witness Vernon Bundy upon his last-minute emergence. (29) Gurvich was present shortly thereafter at a critical meeting between Garrison, Assistant DA Andrew Sciambra, and journalist James Phelan, concerning the DA's star witness, Perry Raymond Russo. (30) Amidst all this activity, it was Gurvich's agency that conducted most of the polygraph tests ordered by Garrison, some of which are cited as evidence by Garrison advocates to this day. (31)
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On March 1, Gurvich was privy to Garrison's decision to arrest Clay Shaw, and it was Gurvich who announced Shaw's arrest to the media. (27) Garrison subsequently sent Gurvich to San Francisco to check Clay Shaw's 1963 hotel records and conduct research on "gay hangouts" in that city. (28) The following week, Gurvich participated in Clay Shaw's preliminary hearing and was one of three NODA investigators who interviewed key witness Vernon Bundy upon his last-minute emergence. (29) Gurvich was present shortly thereafter at a critical meeting between Garrison, Assistant DA Andrew Sciambra, and journalist James Phelan, concerning the DA's star witness, Perry Raymond Russo. (30) Amidst all this activity, it was Gurvich's agency that conducted most of the polygraph tests ordered by Garrison, some of which are cited as evidence by Garrison advocates to this day. (31)
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On March 1, Gurvich was privy to Garrison's decision to arrest Clay Shaw, and it was Gurvich who announced Shaw's arrest to the media. (27) Garrison subsequently sent Gurvich to San Francisco to check Clay Shaw's 1963 hotel records and conduct research on "gay hangouts" in that city. (28) The following week, Gurvich participated in Clay Shaw's preliminary hearing and was one of three NODA investigators who interviewed key witness Vernon Bundy upon his last-minute emergence. (29) Gurvich was present shortly thereafter at a critical meeting between Garrison, Assistant DA Andrew Sciambra, and journalist James Phelan, concerning the DA's star witness, Perry Raymond Russo. (30) Amidst all this activity, it was Gurvich's agency that conducted most of the polygraph tests ordered by Garrison, some of which are cited as evidence by Garrison advocates to this day. (31)
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4. Actually, Gurvich neither appeared in the broadcast, nor contributed to it in any way.
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Gurvich joined the JFK probe on or about December 23, 1966 (cf. US District Court civil action, Clay L. Shaw v. Jim Garrison, Decision of Judge Herbert Christenberry ), went public with his misgivings about the investigation on June 23, 1967 (cf. Paris Flammonde, The Kennedy Conspiracy [New York: Meredith, 1969], p. 315), and left the probe shortly thereafter. (Cf. Lambert, pp.
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At the time that Gurvich came aboard, however, virtually no one outside the DA's office knew about the then-secret JFK probe. Gurvich told the HSCA that Garrison had invited him "to join his staff as an investigator on 'a very important project.' Gurvitch [sic] agreed to do so and was soon told by Garrison that it involved a conspiracy to assassinate President Kennedy."
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According to Sergio Arcacha Smith, Gurvich presented himself to Arcacha as Garrison's "Chief Executive Aide.
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(Joachim Joe

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