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This profile was last updated on 10/25/07  and contains information from public web pages.

Captain William Eppes

Wrong Captain William Eppes?
 
Background

Employment History

  • Commander
    Eastern Shore
  • Second-In-Command
    Saint Christopher's Island
  • Town Warden
    Dover
  • Tobacco Inspector
    Shirley Hundred
  • Captain
7 Total References
Web References
February 25, 1568
baker.canavancentral.com, 25 Oct 2007 [cached]
William Stone had spent almost 20 years in Northampton County, Virginia at Old Plantation Creek on land that had been patented by Captain William Eppes, the commander of the Eastern Shore, at Old Plantation Creek.
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Eppes asked his friend William Stone in 1628 to manage his plantation.
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Previously, Mumms had been stationed with John Baker under the command of William Eppes.
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Hill later married the widow of Colonel John Custis of Arlington House on Old Plantation Creek adjacent to the land where the Virginia Company fort had been established and therefore the location of Captain William Eppes, John Baker, William Mumms, William Stone, and very near the plantation of Susanna Baker Eyre and her subsequent husbands Thomas Eyre and Francis Potts.
John Baker (1604-1654)
baker.canavancentral.com, 25 Oct 2007 [cached]
John Baker was an indentured servant contracted to work for the Virginia Company and listed in the 1624 Eastern Shore muster of Captain William Eppes, the military commander of the Eastern Shore.
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Commander William Eppes was from Ashford in Kent, England, the same town where the father of Sir Thomas Smythe retired.
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In the census of 1624, John Baker was listed indentured to Captain William Eppes, along with twelve others, in this case they were indentured employees of the Virginia Company, and they lived near the tip of the Eastern Shore at what was known as DALES GIFT.
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In the 1624 muster, there were registered only 19 buildings in the entire "Eastern Shore" colony, and Eppes was at the palisades fort on Old Plantation Creek with two dwelling houses, 3 store houses, 2 shallops, and one boat with oars listed for his own muster of 25 people.
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Captain William Eppes and the rest of his crew, including John Baker and William Mumms, were registered again in the census of 1625, but the total population had declined from 70 to roughly 51 people in that twelve months.
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The following year, on February 3, 1626, Captain William Eppes made claim to Sir George Yeardley for 450 acres on the "Easterne Shoare of the Bay of Chesepeiacke, nere unto the plantation of Accomacke on the mouth of Kings Creek" for the transport of nine men: including John Baker (Barker), Edward Rogers, and Thomas Warden who all arrived on the "Ann" in 1623 and served under Eppes in the colonial muster on Old Plantation Creek.
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The following year, on February 3, 1626, Captain William Eppes made claim to Sir George Yeardley for 450 acres on the "Easterne Shoare of the Bay of Chesepeiacke, nere unto the plantation of Accomacke on the mouth of Kings Creek" for the transport of nine men: including John Baker (Barker), Edward Rogers, and Thomas Warden who all arrived on the "Ann" in 1623 and served under Eppes in the colonial muster on Old Plantation Creek.
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Eppes was sailing down the James River to Smythe's Hundred in a storm when his man grounded their ship, and Eppes belted the man over the head with his sword still in the scabbard, cleaving open his skull.
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Eppes was sailing down the James River to Smythe's Hundred in a storm when his man grounded their ship, and Eppes belted the man over the head with his sword still in the scabbard, cleaving open his skull.
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In 1628, Eppes had again created some more problems when he sent Lieutenant Thomas Savage head over heels in a fist fight. Savage was well liked and respected as he was the first white man to live on the shore and had been sent earlier in his career by Sir Thomas Dale to live among the Indians and learn their language and customs. Visit the Eppes page
Captain Eppes was replaced as commander in 1628 by Captain Thomas Graves, who had replaced him once before at Smythe's Hundred.
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Eppes was reassigned to Saint Christopher's Island, where in 1630 he sat upon the governing council.
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On July 18, 1633, Captain William Eppes wrote to "Lovinge friend William Stone now by ... bound in the goos ship "Loyalte" of London to the Eastern Shor of Chisapond Bay to seize and re-enter all my said land".
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Captain William Eppes was involved in another legal problem in England in 1639 and was planning to leave England but died by 1640.
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Graves other daughter, Katherine, married William Roper whose first wife we believe was the sister of Captain William Eppes.
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An interesting note is that Captain William Eppes's wife Margaret Eppes sailed to Virginia in 1621 on the GEORGE with John Stone, Governor William Stone's father.
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In 1580, William Eppes, uncle of Captain William Eppes mentioned names of tenants on his property and they were John Baker of BROOKLAND, John Stringer, John Robyns of Lydd, as well as John Wilcock and Edward Fowle... all family names appearing in Northampton, Virginia!
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Then in the 1630s, to add fuel to that idea, John Baker reappeared near City Point on the James River as a headright of Francis Eppes, younger brother of William Eppes.
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During the 1630s, at least four of the men from the Eastern Shore muster of William Eppes were neighbors of his younger brother, Francis Eppes, commander of the upper James River.
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John Baker reappeared on the upper James River, which at that time was another Virginia Company outpost commanded by the younger brother of Captain William Eppes, Francis Eppes.
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This is an interesting fifteen-year transition for John Baker, from indentured servant under Captain William Eppes, to major James River landholder.
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This would mean that father John Baker most likely fathered Hugh Baker in England probably just before coming to Virginia, which is in keeping with my theory that John Baker accompanied Captain William Eppes to St. Christopher's Island and then returned to England with Eppes at the conclusion of his indenture, or perhaps John Baker sailed back to St. Christopher's Island and caught a ship to England.
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This would mean that father John Baker most likely fathered Hugh Baker in England probably just before coming to Virginia, which is in keeping with my theory that John Baker accompanied Captain William Eppes to St. Christopher's Island and then returned to England with Eppes at the conclusion of his indenture, or perhaps John Baker sailed back to St. Christopher's Island and caught a ship to England.
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Mumms (Mumm/Munn) is an unusual name but we found this name in Kent England in the same period, and in the general area as the Bakers of Brookland and not too distance from Eppes at Ashford.
The Bakers of Battle and Sissinghurst
baker.canavancentral.com, 25 Oct 2007 [cached]
Baker remained there with his commander, Captain William Eppes until at least 1628, when Eppes was sent to serve as second-in-command at Saint Christopher's Island in the CARIBBEAN where pirates were a serious problem attacking English shipping.
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John Baker possibly returned to Saint Christopher's Island, and / or England, but we next found him across the Chesapeake Bay with several of the men who had served with him on the Eastern Shore in the early 1630s with Captain Francis Eppes, younger brother of Captain William Eppes.
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William inherited Raglan Castle from his mother, Maud Morley, and his Welsh father, Thomas ap Gwillim ap Jenkin (d 1438).
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As we began to research his roots, it appeared that John Baker (born approximately 1604) of the company plantation commanded by Captain William Eppes on the Eastern Shore could be a relative of Captain Eppes.
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Joanne's father was the son of Alan Eppes of Lydd, and it was his son, her uncle, John Eppes who moved to Ashford in Kent and fathered military captains William Eppes and Francis Eppes.
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After his older brother, Captain William Eppes left the colony and became second in charge at Saint Christopher's Island, John Baker and others from the Eastern Shore plantation resettled on land adjacent to Francis Eppes on land we know today as City Point in Hopewell on the James River.
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His other cousin, William Eppes (1554-1595), had his will witnessed by Lawrence Baker of Brookland. {[It is interesting that Michael Baker of Mayfield had a son named Lawrence Baker.] This is more than likely Lawrence Baker (Born November 21, 1570) to John Baker of Brookland and his wife Jane.
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Old Romney was adjacent to New Romney and the two had been the home of a citizen group called the Romney Brotherhood whose members included in 1489 a Clement Baker (Will 1516), and Sir John "Bloody" Baker of Sissinghurst in 1549.
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This was the same parish of William Eppes (1506-1580), the great uncle of Captain William Eppes of the Eastern Shore muster, and he requested in his will that he be buried at Saint Nicholas. William Eppes was the town warden of Dover, a Member of Parliament, and Speaker of the Cinque Ports.
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Captain William Eppes' cousin Joanne Eppes married John Baker of Brookland, and they had six children; Thomas Baker, Thomasine Baker, and Margaret Baker and three others whose names were not mentioned, all born before 1580.
Bakers of Saint Marys City
baker.canavancentral.com, 25 Oct 2007 [cached]
Governor William Stone, who was governor during the turbulent times between Maryland's Catholics and Virginia's Puritans, spent two decades on the Eastern Shore at the exact plantation where the first John Baker had been declared a headright by Captain William Eppes in 1626, and very near the company land where Baker spent the years 1623 to 1626.
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Our first John Baker was stationed with Eppes on the Eastern Shore but resettled early in the 1630s on the upper James River at what we know as City Point, Turkey Island, and Shirley Hundred where he was apparently a tobacco inspector at the end of his life.
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9. Lewellin's son-in-law claimed headrights for William Mumms who had been stationed with John Baker under the command of William Eppes.
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Captain William Whittington would reappear on Old Plantation Creek where John Baker had started, and his son, Colonel William Whittington sold fifteen hundred acres of the land originally patented by Captain William Eppes on Old Plantation Creek, and married the daughter of Tabitha Scarborough Brown Smart Custis Hill, Tabitha Smart.
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Note that John Custis purchased the old William Eppes - William Stone land from William Whittington on Old Plantation Creek, and then Colonel Edward Hill purchased the John Baker property at Shirley Hundred.
Hugh Baker
baker.canavancentral.com, 18 Jan 2011 [cached]
This would mean that father John Baker most likely fathered Hugh Baker in England probably just before coming to Virginia, which is in keeping with my theory that John Baker accompanied Captain William Eppes to St. Christopher's Island and then returned to England with Eppes at the conclusion of his indenture, or perhaps John Baker sailed back to St. Christopher's Island and caught a ship to England.
...
This would mean that father John Baker most likely fathered Hugh Baker in England probably just before coming to Virginia, which is in keeping with my theory that John Baker accompanied Captain William Eppes to St. Christopher's Island and then returned to England with Eppes at the conclusion of his indenture, or perhaps John Baker sailed back to St. Christopher's Island and caught a ship to England.
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Hugh married Mary Mumms on or before February 16, 1651, and Mary was the daughter of William Mumms (Mums, Munn) who had served with father John Baker under Captain William Eppes at the Eastern Shore plantation.
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Mumms (Mumm/Munn) is an unusual name but we found this name in Kent England in the same period, and in the general area as the Bakers of Brookland and not too distance from Eppes at Ashford.
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Captain Thomas Savage and Captain William Eppes were recorded in a fight where Eppes placed Savage heels over his head.
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Captain William Jones served with John Baker (circa 1604- circa 1656) and William Mumms at the Old Plantation Creek muster of Captain William Eppes in 1624.
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Captain Thomas Savage and Captain William Eppes were recorded in a fight where Eppes placed Savage heels over his head.
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Captain William Jones served with John Baker (circa 1604- circa 1656) and William Mumms at the Old Plantation Creek muster of Captain William Eppes in 1624.
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