Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong William Dyess?

William E. Dyess

Death March

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Death March

Web References(20 Total References)


The Bataan Death March, 1942

eyewitnesstohistory.com [cached]

Captain William Dyess was a fighter pilot stationed on Luzon when the Japanese invaded.
Captured when the American forces on Bataan surrendered, he joined the Death March and was interned by the Japanese. In April 1943, Captain Dyess was one of three prisoners able to escape from their captors. Captain Dyess eventually made his way back to America where his story was published. We join his story as he encounters his first atrocity of the March: Lt. Colonel William Dyess, 1943 'He held these out, ducking his head and sucking in his breath to attract notice. The big Jap looked at the money. Without a word he grabbed the captain by the shoulder and shoved him down to his knees. He pulled the sword out of the scabbard and raised it high over his head, holding it with both hands. This eyewitness account appears in: Dyess, William E., The Dyess Story (1943); . How To Cite This Article: "The Bataan Death March, 1942," EyeWitness to History, www.eyewitnesstohistory.com (2009). Captain William Dyess, the author of this eyewitness account returned to the US in July 1943. He was promoted to Lt. Colonel and began training in a P-38 fighter plane in anticipation of returning to combat. On December 23, 1943, he was killed in an air crash while attempting to steer his burning plane to a vacant field near Los Angeles. Lt. Colonel, Dyess told his story to a correspondent from The Chicago Tribune from a hospital bed.


People and Places: WORLD WAR II BATAAN DEATH MARCH -

peopleus.blogspot.com [cached]

Col. William E. Dyess, Air Corps, of Albany, Tex. Dyess is dead-killed in a fighter plane crash at Burbank, Calif., recently while preparing to return to duty in the Pacific.
What was in store for them was to begin with "the march of death" - and Dyess reported that, beaten and hopeless as they were, they never would have surrendered if they had guessed what lay ahead. About June 1, the Americans were removed from Camp O'Donnell to Cabanatuan, where Dyess joined Mellnik and McCoy, who had come in from Corregidor. Conditions there were a little better. There was adequate drinking water, it was possible to bathe in muddy water; but the diet did not improve. And the brutality continued - men were beaten with shovels and golf clubs, "men were literally worked to death." Three officers who tried to escape were caught, stripped to their shorts, their hands tied behind them and pulled up by ropes fastened overhead, and kept in this position in the blazing sun for two days; periodically the Japs beat them with a two-by-four; finally one was beheaded and the others shot. By Oct. 26, when Dyess, McCoy and Mellnik left Cabanatuan, 3,000 of the American prisoners had died. Red Cross Salvation The three officers were taken with 966 other prisoners, to a penal camp at Davao, Mindanao and put to hard labor. Food was slightly better there, but "the salvation of the American prisoners of war," Dyess reported, was the American and British Red Cross supplies, both clothing and food, that finally began to arrive months late. The beatings, the murder, the studied mistreatment and humiliation continued. By April 1943, there were 1,100 of the 2,000 prisoners at Davao still able to work. This was the life from which McCoy, Dyess and Mellnik escaped April 4, 1943. Captain William Dyess was a fighter pilot stationed on Luzon when the Japanese invaded. Captured when the American forces on Bataan surrendered, he joined the Death March and was interned by the Japanese. In April 1943, Captain Dyess was one of three prisoners able to escape from their captors. Captain Dyess eventually made his way back to America where his story was published. We join his story as he encounters his first atrocity of the March:


Operation PLUM - Photo Gallery

operationplum.com [cached]

Capt. William Dyess, Commanding Officer of the 21st Pursuit Squadron, Bataan Field, March 3, 1942.


www.abilenetxhomes.com

Originally established as Abilene Army Air Base in 1942, Dyess was named for a Texas native who survived the Bataan Death March, Lt.
Colonel William Edwin Dyess. Dyess has remai9ned a strategic Air Force location since.


www.news-gazette.com

Among the others whose stories are told is that of army pilot William E. Dyess, who was married to late News-Gazette publisher Marajen Stevich Chinigo.
Dyess survived the death march and imprisonment and later escaped. After he made his way back to the U.S., he collaborated with an American newspaper on a multi-part series about what happened, sparking outrage from coast to coast. It's an incredible story.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory