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Captain William E. Dyess

Wrong Captain William E. Dyess?
Cabanatuan
 
Background

Employment History

  • Captain
  • Death March

Education

  • Tarleton State University
18 Total References
Web References
Col. William E. Dyess, Air ...
peopleus.blogspot.com [cached]
Col. William E. Dyess, Air Corps, of Albany, Tex. Dyess is dead-killed in a fighter plane crash at Burbank, Calif., recently while preparing to return to duty in the Pacific.
...
What was in store for them was to begin with "the march of death" - and Dyess reported that, beaten and hopeless as they were, they never would have surrendered if they had guessed what lay ahead.
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About June 1, the Americans were removed from Camp O'Donnell to Cabanatuan, where Dyess joined Mellnik and McCoy, who had come in from Corregidor. Conditions there were a little better. There was adequate drinking water, it was possible to bathe in muddy water; but the diet did not improve. And the brutality continued - men were beaten with shovels and golf clubs, "men were literally worked to death."
Three officers who tried to escape were caught, stripped to their shorts, their hands tied behind them and pulled up by ropes fastened overhead, and kept in this position in the blazing sun for two days; periodically the Japs beat them with a two-by-four; finally one was beheaded and the others shot. By Oct. 26, when Dyess, McCoy and Mellnik left Cabanatuan, 3,000 of the American prisoners had died.
Red Cross Salvation
The three officers were taken with 966 other prisoners, to a penal camp at Davao, Mindanao and put to hard labor. Food was slightly better there, but "the salvation of the American prisoners of war," Dyess reported, was the American and British Red Cross supplies, both clothing and food, that finally began to arrive months late. The beatings, the murder, the studied mistreatment and humiliation continued. By April 1943, there were 1,100 of the 2,000 prisoners at Davao still able to work.
This was the life from which McCoy, Dyess and Mellnik escaped April 4, 1943.
...
Captain William Dyess was a fighter pilot stationed on Luzon when the Japanese invaded. Captured when the American forces on Bataan surrendered, he joined the Death March and was interned by the Japanese. In April 1943, Captain Dyess was one of three prisoners able to escape from their captors. Captain Dyess eventually made his way back to America where his story was published.
We join his story as he encounters his first atrocity of the March:
Originally established as Abilene Army Air ...
www.abilenetxhomes.com, 13 Nov 2011 [cached]
Originally established as Abilene Army Air Base in 1942, Dyess was named for a Texas native who survived the Bataan Death March, Lt. Colonel William Edwin Dyess.
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Dyess has remai9ned a strategic Air Force location since.
Among the others whose stories are ...
www.news-gazette.com, 14 Sept 2010 [cached]
Among the others whose stories are told is that of army pilot William E. Dyess, who was married to late News-Gazette publisher Marajen Stevich Chinigo. Dyess survived the death march and imprisonment and later escaped. After he made his way back to the U.S., he collaborated with an American newspaper on a multi-part series about what happened, sparking outrage from coast to coast. It's an incredible story.
Among the prisoners was army pilot ...
www.asiabookroom.com, 7 Jan 2010 [cached]
Among the prisoners was army pilot William E. Dyess. With a few others, Dyess escaped from his POW camp and was among the very first to bring reports of the horrors back to a shocked United States. His story galvanised the nation and remains one of the most powerful personal narratives of American fighting men.
...
William E. Dyess was born in Albany, Texas. As a young army air forces pilot he was shipped to Manila in the spring of 1941., Shortly after his escape and return to the United States, Colonel Dyess was killed while testing a new airplane. He did not survive long enough to learn that he had been awarded a Congressional Medal of Honor.
Texas Heritage Trails : World War II
www.texasfortstrail.com, 12 Mar 2010 [cached]
William E. Dyess was born in Albany, Texas. As a young army air forces pilot he was shipped to Manila in the spring of 1941. When the Japanese invaded the Phillipines with overwhelming power, U.S. - Filipino forces surrendered and unwittingly placed themselves at the mercy of a foe who considered itself unimpaired by the Geneva Convention. Dyess was among the prisoners of war forced to march in the Bataan "Death March. With a few others, Dyess eventually escaped and was among the first to bring reports of the prisoner-of-war horrors back to a shocked United States. Shortly after his escape and return to America, Colonel Dyess was killed while testing a new airplane. He did not survive long enough to learn that he had been awarded a Congressional Medal of Honor. Colonel Dyess is the namesake of Dyess Air Force Base, Abilene, TX.
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