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Wrong William Burkhardt?

William Burkhardt

Chief, Microbial Hazards Science Branch

Food and Drug Administration

HQ Phone:  (301) 827-6500

Direct Phone: (251) ***-****direct phone

Email: w***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Food and Drug Administration

5600 Fishers Lane

Rockville, Maryland,20852

United States

Company Description

China's Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) is now offering a reward of about 50,000 US dollars for relevant information on counterfeit drug production. The bounty aims to "encourage the public to report illegal activities so as to determine, control and elimi...more

Background Information

Employment History

Maintenance Mechanic Supervisor

National Park Service


Chief, Microbial Hazards Science Branch

U.S. Food and Drug Administration/ U.S Public Health Service


Electrician

National Park Service


Web References(8 Total References)


ISSC - Membership List

www.issc.org [cached]

William Burkhardt
USFDA PO Box 157 Dauphin Island, AL 36528 (251) 690-3361 (251) 694-4477 Fax


www.icmss2013.com

Dr. William Burkhardt
Dr. William Burkhardt Dr. Burkhardt is the Chief of FDA's Microbial Hazards Science Branch located at Dauphin Island, AL and is a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service He is responsible for coordinating and oversight to the majority of FDA's microbiological research investigating the occurrence and distribution of autochthonous (Vibrios) and anthropogenic (fecally derived) contaminants in molluscan shellfish. He has over 27 years of experience investigating microbial contaminants in estuarine waters and its impact on the sanitary quality of shellfish harvested from them. These investigations have provided scientific support for FDA policies associated with molluscan shellfish harvest to improve food safety. He is the co-inventor of a quantitative real-time assay for NoV that is licensed by a major biotech company. Dr. Burkhardt serves as an agency subject matter expert for enteric viral pathogens in FDA regulated foods. Lastly, he has co-authored two FDA risk profiles (NoV and HAV) and serves as a technical expert to the joint US/Canadian NoV risk assessment for molluscan shellfish.


Food Safety Newsletter - FoodHACCP.com

www.foodhaccp.com [cached]

"There's a disconnect between what we want to see and what is actually implemented," said William Burkhardt, a food virologist and microbiologist with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA.
Burkhardt, of Dolphin Island, Ala., helped author a cleanliness and hand-washing study that was also sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. That said, there are tens of thousands of fast-food establishments around America, and incidents such as a recent hepatitis A outbreak in the Quad-City region happen very infrequently. "I only know of a few documented cases like this," Burkhardt said. Norovirus, hepatitis A and E. coli, another gastrointestinal infection, are the most common food-borne illnesses involving restaurants, Burkhardt said. Burkhardt is a proponent of gloves being used by food handlers. "These are relatively inexpensive," he said. However, the gloves must be discarded if they become dirty by performing a non-food task such as working at a cash register. Turnover, vigilance Fast-food restaurant owners and managers in particular must be vigilant about enforcing cleanliness rules among their workforce because the industry has so much turnover, Burkhardt said.


www.qctimes.com

"There's a disconnect between what we want to see and what is actually implemented," said William Burkhardt, a food virologist and microbiologist with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA.
Burkhardt, of Dolphin Island, Ala., helped author a cleanliness and hand-washing study that was also sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. That said, there are tens of thousands of fast-food establishments around America, and incidents such as a recent hepatitis A outbreak in the Quad-City region happen very infrequently. "I only know of a few documented cases like this," Burkhardt said. Norovirus, hepatitis A and E. coli, another gastrointestinal infection, are the most common food-borne illnesses involving restaurants, Burkhardt said. Burkhardt is a proponent of gloves being used by food handlers. "These are relatively inexpensive," he said. However, the gloves must be discarded if they become dirty by performing a non-food task such as working at a cash register. Turnover, vigilance Fast-food restaurant owners and managers in particular must be vigilant about enforcing cleanliness rules among their workforce because the industry has so much turnover, Burkhardt said. Posted in Local on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 10:30 pm Updated: 10:34 pm. | Tags: William Burkhardt, U.s. Food And Drug Administration, U.s. Department Of Health And Human Services, Hepatitis A, Food-borne Illness, Rock Island County Health Department, Doni Denucci, Paul Guse, Dr. Patricia Quinlisk


www.discuss-gra.com

Will they be required to sop up pizza grease with paper towels before eating?
The signs are ubiquitous in restaurant restrooms: "Employees must wash hands before returning to work."But a federal government scientist who co-authored a study on the subject says more than half of all employees in the fast-food industry fail to wash their hands properly or use gloves when working."There's a disconnect between what we want to see and what is actually implemented," said William Burkhardt, a food virologist and microbiologist with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA.Burkhardt, of Dolphin Island, Ala., helped author a cleanliness and hand-washing study that was also sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. hat said, there are tens of thousands of fast-food establishments around America, and incidents such as a recent hepatitis A outbreak in the Quad-City region happen very infrequently."I only know of a few documented cases like this," Burkhardt said. ome 25 people in the Quad-City region have a confirmed case of hepatitis A. Most of the cases, if not all, are connected to a McDonald's restaurant at400 W. 1st St., Milan, Ill., where two employees were diagnosed with the disease that has flu-like symptoms. Eleven of the Quad-City region cases required hospitalization. he Rock Island County Health Department just concluded on Tuesday a series of clinics at which at least 5,324 people were inoculated against the disease.


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