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Captain William Richard Bligh

Wrong Captain William Richard Bligh?

Celebrity

 
200 Total References
Web References
Biography - William Bligh - Australian Dictionary of Biography
adb.online.anu.edu.au, 1 Oct 2012 [cached]
William Bligh Biography - William Bligh - Australian Dictionary of Biography
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William Bligh (1754-1817), by Alexander Huey
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William Bligh (1754-1817), by Alexander Huey
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William Bligh (1754-1817), naval officer and governor, was born on 9 September 1754 at Plymouth, England, where his father was a boatman and land waiter in the customs service. He was descended from a family settled in St Tudy, Cornwall, since 1680, whose members had been mayors of Bodmin in the sixteenth century. William was entered in H.M.S. Monmouth on 1 July 1762, was paid off the following February, and effectively joined the navy on 27 July 1770. Since there was no vacancy for midshipmen, he was rated 'able-seaman', but he messed with the former and officially became one in February 1771. Whatever his formal education, in later life he showed wide interests and very considerable attainments. On 17 March 1776 he was appointed master of the Resolution, then setting out on James Cook's third voyage. On it he was frequently employed in 'constructing charts … and in drawing plans of … bays and harbours'. Between the return of the ship in October 1780 and the end of the French war in 1783, Bligh was master of the Belle Poule, was promoted lieutenant and fought in two general actions.
In February 1781 he married Elizabeth Betham, of Glasgow, daughter of a customs officer on the Isle of Man, and niece of Duncan Campbell, merchant, shipowner and contractor in charge of convict hulks in the Thames. Between 1783 and 1787 Bligh served Campbell in the West Indian trade.
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Bligh was certainly extremely hot-tempered; he swore well and vigorously and was infuriated by any incompetence shown by his subordinates; but the evidence suggests that his rages were short-lived, that in general he was not a harsh commander and that the mutiny was his misfortune, not his fault. This was certainly the view of the Admiralty, which promoted him captain in November and in 1791 sent him in the Providence to make a second attempt to transplant bread-fruit from Tahiti to the West Indies. This time he successfully accomplished his mission.
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This verdict did Bligh no harm, for on 15 March, Banks, always a man of influence where New South Wales was concerned, offered to obtain for him the post of governor to New South Wales in succession to Governor Philip Gidley King, at a salary of £2000, double that of his predecessor, and large enough to attract a senior post-captain.
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Bligh reached Sydney on 6 August 1806. He did not assume office for a week, and in the interval received from Governor King grants of 240 acres (97 ha) at Camperdown, 105 acres (42 ha) near Parramatta and 1000 acres (405 ha) near Rouse Hill on the Hawkesbury Road; curiously enough, there is no mention of these grants in the dispatches or of the 790 acres (320 ha) called 'Thanks', which Bligh granted to Mrs King the following January, though for grants of this size the governors had been instructed to obtain the approbation of the secretary of state. However, the governor rigidly insisted on his having such approval before he indulged other applicants even when they had letters from the under-secretary, to the great annoyance of Dr Robert Townson, Eber Bunker and Captain Short. With Short, Bligh had quarrelled on the voyage out, in a dispute which the secretary of state thought arose from 'very trivial causes' and 'proceeded to a length to which it could not possibly have advanced had you both been impressed with a just sense … of the propriety … of preserving a good understanding with each other'.
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Unfortunately Bligh never possessed this sense; instead, he showed 'an unfortunate capacity for breeding rebellion'. In this incident, he was probably legally in the right, but the affair, like all such affairs, made enemies.
In New South Wales Bligh found great distress, caused partly by the disastrous Hawkesbury floods, partly by the falling off in ships arriving with supplies and convict labour after the renewal of the Napoleonic wars and partly by the increasing influence of the local trading sharks as Governor King's health had grown worse. Bligh at once organized the distribution of flood relief and promised settlers that the government stores would buy their crop after the next harvest; but he allowed his temper to get the better of him in a violent blast against John Macarthur about his sheep and cattle. He was right to stress the shortage of herdsmen. Convict labour was scarce. No prisoners had arrived in 1805 and only about 550 males in 1806-07, fewer than those becoming free by effluxion of time; but the shortage never affected the farm which Bligh himself had bought on the Hawkesbury. This, he claimed, was a 'model', to show the settlers the benefits of efficient cultivation.
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Bligh later suggested that he would have paid for these supplies in due course, but he took his time about even considering to do so. Meanwhile he had suspended D'Arcy Wentworth for employing 'invalids' from the hospital on his private concerns, and refused to tell that officer why he had done so.
Such actions helped to increase the opposition raised to his otherwise proper and urgently needed reforms. On 4 October 1806 he issued new port regulations to tighten up the government's control of ships, their cargoes, including spirits, and their crews, including possible escaping convicts. On 3 January 1807 he ordered that all promissory notes should be drawn 'payable in sterling money', a regulation which would prevent any repetition of a legal dispute in the preceding year between Macarthur and Thompson over the value of a note expressed in wheat. On 14 February he reissued the often-broken order about illicit stills, and forbade under stringent penalties the bartering of spirits for grain, labour, food, or any other goods. These orders, desirable though they were, aroused intense opposition among interested parties; it was no wonder that Bligh told the Colonial Office in October that the governor 'must be determined and firm in his measures and not subject to any control here'.
Bligh had little time to concern himself with Van Diemen's Land, but he proceeded, as instructed, to organize the removal of the settlers from Norfolk Island to the Derwent. In Sydney, perturbed by a suspected rising of the Irish, he decided to split up eight of the alleged ring-leaders, though six had been acquitted when tried, and five were not legally convicts under sentence to transportation. High-handedly he sent two each to Norfolk Island, the Derwent and Port Dalrymple. Then after Simeon Lord, Henry Kable, James Underwood and John Macarthur in turn had come into conflict with the governor's efforts to enforce the law, Bligh so annoyed officers in the New South Wales Corps by his interference in its concerns and his abuse of its members, that Major George Johnston felt called upon to complain to the commander-in-chief.
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In a laudable effort to improve the appearance of Sydney, Bligh ordered those said to be illegally occupying certain town sites to move, and questioned the leases of others, including Macarthur, Johnston, Garnham Blaxcell, John Jamieson and David Mann, which conflicted with the plan of the town.
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The bulk of the citizens were apathetic; many of the Hawkesbury settlers supported the governor; but Bligh had been singularly successful in antagonizing a number of leading men in the colony, and he was personally quite unfitted to handle the situation that was developing. Macarthur's ranting about the defence of liberty and property, which were never in danger, gave Johnston excuse to claim that 'insurrection and massacre' were imminent because Bligh was planning 'to subvert the laws of the country' and 'to terrify and influence the Courts of Justice'. This was grossly exaggerated. On the criminal court six of the officers had always to sit. During 1807 the governor had removed Surgeon Thomas Jamison from the magistracy as 'inimical to the government' and had replaced some of the military magistrates by civilians, but when Macarthur had won his suit against Robert Campbell junior, Bligh accepted the decision without ado.
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For more than a year after his arrest in January 1808 Bligh remained in confinement in Sydney, refusing to promise to sail to England if liberated. In February 1809 he agreed to go if placed in the Porpoise, but when on board he broke his word on the ground that it had been extorted by force. On 17 March he sailed to the Derwent, hoping for the support of Lieutenant-Governor David Collins; but though Collins at first welcomed him he refused to denounce the rebel government and relations soon became strained. Notwithstanding his promise not to meddle in local affairs, Bligh interfered with boats on the river, stirred up local animosities and became such an intolerable nuisance that Collins, finding his conduct 'unhandsome in several respects', felt compelled to forbid local boats to approach or to victual the Porpoise.
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Thus isolated, Bli
Arturo Toscanini
www.coopertoons.com, 8 Aug 2012 [cached]
As was the case with many people with short fuses like Captain William Bligh of Mutiny on the Bounty fame, once the maestro blew off his steam, he would calm down and continue.
early Explorers | Tasmania, Australia | Abel Tasman, James Cook, Banks, Furneaux, William Bligh, George Bass
www.tasmaniantimbers.com, 8 July 2012 [cached]
William Bligh
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William Bligh
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William Bligh was also aboard the "Resolution", impressed with his cartography skills and navigational ability, Cook assigned him as Master.
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William Bligh, 1754 - 1814 Explorer and Navigator William Bligh, had visited Van Diemen's Land in 1777, with James Cook on the "Resolution".
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Bligh, a young navigational officer, had a great sense of location and navigational ability.
In 1788, charting the south-east coast of Van Diemen's Land, Bligh aboard the "H.M.S. Bounty" sailed into Adventure Bay and dropped anchor on the 19th of August 1788, needing fresh water supplies and wood for the ship's fires.
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Bligh, found fresh clean water in a gully that was dry on his previous visit with Cook.
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Bligh planted seven apple trees a short distance from the shore. The Bounty sailed from Adventure Bay September 4th.1788, headed for Tahiti to take delivery of Bread Fruit plants.
The Bounty mutiny occurred April 28th, 1789, set adrift in a longboat with eighteen others, Bligh, navigated a remarkable 6,400 km to Timor. On returning to England, he was found not guilty of any wrong doing regarding the Bounty mutiny and was promoted to captain of the HMS Providence.
Captain Bligh, returned to Van Diemen's Land anchoring once again in Adventure Bay in February 1792.
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William Bligh, remarked, " I saw no signs of any ships having been here, and the trees I marked remained the same as I had left them in 1788". Bligh, with two botanists onboard, planted cress's, celery, acorn and various fruit trees at Adventure Bay.
Bligh, was appointed Governor of New South Wales in 1806, and ordered to break the power of the Rum Corps.
In January 1808 a mutiny took place and Bligh, was arrested, imprisoned and was deposed as Governor.
In 1809, Captain William Bligh, returned to Van Diemen's Land, seeking support to restore him to power.
The most important farm was owned ...
www.pureprop.com.au, 28 Sept 2012 [cached]
The most important farm was owned by William Gore (1765-1845) who was the provost-marshal under Governor William Bligh.
Clontarf Online  - William Bligh
www.clontarfonline.com, 29 Aug 2012 [cached]
Captain Bligh Clontarf Online - William Bligh
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William Bligh
William Bligh, British naval officer & marine surveyor, was born in Plymouth, England on the 4th October 1754. Having entered the navy he sailed with Captain James Cook on his second voyage around the world (1772-1774). He saw service in naval battles (1781/1782). In 1786, when the Corporation for the Preserving and Improving the Port of Dublin was established, he was taking part in naval blockades of the French ports.
In late 1787 he was assigned to H.M.S. Bounty. While sailing from Tahiti to the West Indies, he, and 18 of his crew, were overpowered and set adrift in a small boat in the Pacific Ocean. In April 1789 Bligh's skills as a navigator of the highest quality was demonstrated by his ability to sail the Bounty's lifeboat, which was 23 foot long and 6' 9'' wide, from the island of Torfoa to the island of Timor, a distance of 3618 miles, with only a sextant as a navigational aid.
He returned to England in 1790 and continued his career in the navy. Captain William Bligh was invited to survey Dublin bay by the director general of inland navigation. He had a reputation, earned in the South Seas, as a marine surveyor. He arrived in Dublin in September 1800 and commenced work immediately. He completed his survey and report in 3 months, noting in his report that this had been achieved notwithstanding the unfavourable and tempestuous time of the year.
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Captain William Bligh returned to his naval duties in early 1801 and fought with Admiral Horatio Nelson at the battle of Copenhagen in that year. He was appointed Governor of New South Wales in Australia in 1805, and took his office in 1806. A mutiny took place in the colony, during which Bligh was deposed. He was held in custody until February 1809 and he returned to England in 1810. In 1811 he was promoted to Rear Admiral. In 1814 he was named Vice Admiral Bligh and he died in London in 1817. Read More Here
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