No Photo Available

Last Update

2009-03-16T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Wayne Gregg?

Wayne A. Gregg

HQ Phone: (717) 637-8931

Get ZoomInfo Grow

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Standardbred Breeders Association of Pennsylvania

2310 Hanover Pike

Hanover, Pennsylvania 17331

United States

Company Description

SBAP is developing relationships with our Thoroughbred colleagues to increase our effectiveness at the State Capitol. This spring, SBAP will be touring Harrahs Chester Downs and Philadelphia Park with Senator Michael Brubaker (R - Lancaster, Chairman of t ... more

Find other employees at this company (8)

Background Information

Employment History

At-Large Director

Pittsburgh Dynamo Youth Soccer Association

Web References (9 Total References)


Standardbred Breeders Association of Pennsylvania

www.standardbredbreederspa.org [cached]

Wayne A. Gregg 825 E. Pittsburgh Plaza E Pittsburgh, Pa 15112 wgregg@greggservices.com


TimeSite.com powered by Trot.net

www.timesite.com [cached]

CAMP HILL, Pa. -- The current allocation of slot machine revenue to Pennsylvania's standardbred breeders amounts to about $7.2 million per year divided by more than 1,000 breeders across the state on average, Wayne Gregg, president of Eicarl's Stables, and a director of the Standardbred Breeders Association of Pennsylvania (SBAP), said on June 3.

"This amount wouldn't make a dent in our hay bill," Gregg, a horseman for nearly two decades, said jokingly.
But Gregg knows that slot machine revenue isn't a joking matter to more than 1,000 standardbred breeders across Pennsylvania.
Gregg's state association has been working to build awareness of the fact that the harness racing horse breeders across Pennsylvania are slowly going out of business and the current focus on licensing slot machines at the state's two harness tracks will probably be the last chance for Pennsylvania's breeders to reverse the trend.
"We were once the Keystone of harness racing in the Northeast," Gregg says, "but we lost the competitive edge when our neighbor states used slot machine revenue to boost their harness purses and breeder award programs."
Harness breeder revenue allocations in states like New Jersey, West Virginia and Canada give a greater return on investment to breeders who own farms there and breed winning horses in the those state races.
"A number of Pennsylvania breeders have started moving their operations out of state to take advantage of the more favorable economics elsewhere," Gregg said.
...
"Our land is worth at least ten times present value if we develop it," Gregg said.
...
One objective of the Tomlinson bill is to support the faltering Pennsylvania racing industry, but Gregg says the support is too little, too late for the Harness breeders in the state.
"We are the backbone of the Harness racing industry," he says."We are a vital part of a great industry, and if we go out of state, the legislature is simply trading off our green land and rural agricultural communities to increase gaming interests and revenue in the state.It's that simple in my book."
Gregg is careful to say that he and the SBAP support the Tomlinson bill in principal, even as they watched the breeder percentage of revenue disappear while track owner percentages continue to grow.
"I want a healthy, vibrant industry," Gregg says, "but it won't happen this way.Right now, this formula just boosts racinos, not horse racing."
"We need to get to around 4 percent in SB 20 for the numbers to make sense to us," he says.
...
Gregg and SBAP estimate that at around 4 percent, the return is great enough to trigger investment in PA farmland, and an immediate increase in breeding operations in the state.
"With a little luck at the harness races, I think you will see another 50,000 acres of prime land reclaimed for breeding farms, and I think we can reasonably turn that 4 percent into something like a 10 percent bump in jobs, and increased revenue to our rural communities," Gregg said.
Most recent polls show rural voter support of licensing slot machines at racetracks at about 50-50; while approximately 70-30 statewide favor the bill.
"We are asking all our representatives and senators across the state to think long and hard about the Tomlinson bill," Gregg said.


The Business Journal

www.business-journal.com [cached]

CAMP HILL, Pa. -- The current allocation of slot machine revenue to Pennsylvania's standardbred breeders amounts to about $7.2 million per year divided by more than 1,000 breeders across the state on average, according to Wayne Gregg, president of Eicarl's Stables and a director of the Standardbred Breeders Association of Pennsylvania."This amount wouldn't make a dent in our hay bill," Gregg jokes.

He knows, however, that slot machine revenue isn't a joking matter to more than 1,000 standardbred breeders across Pennsylvania.The association has been working to build awareness of the fact that the harness racing horse breeders across the Pennsylvania are slowly going out of business and the current focus on licensing slot machines at the state's two harness tracks will probably be the last chance for Pennsylvania's breeders to reverse the trend.
"We were once the Keystone of Harness racing in the north east," Gregg says, "but we lost the competitive edge when our neighbor states used slot machine revenue to boost their harness purses and breeder award programs."
...
"Our land is worth at least 10 times present value if we develop it," Gregg says.
...
One objective of the Tomlinson bill is to support the faltering Pennsylvania racing industry, but Gregg says the support is too little, too late for the Harness breeders in the state."We are the backbone of the harness racing industry," he says."We are a vital part of a great industry, and if we go out of state, the legislature is simply trading off our green land and rural agricultural communities to increase gaming interests and revenue in the state."
Although Gregg and the association support the Tomlinson bill in principle, they have watched the breeder percentage of revenue disappear while track owner percentages continue to grow."I want a healthy, vibrant industry," Gregg says, "but it won't happen this way.
...
"It's better than we have now -- which is nothing -- but it's not enough to lift our industry and reverse the migration of our ag business out of state," Gregg maintains.
The association estimates that at around 4%, the return is great enough to trigger investment in Pennsylvania farmland and an immediate increase in breeding operations in the state."With a little luck at the harness races, I think you will see another 50,000 acres of prime Pennsylvania land reclaimed for breeding farms, and I think we can reasonably turn that 4% into something like a 10% bump in jobs, and increased revenue to our rural communities," Gregg says.
Most recent polls, he adds, show rural voter support of licensing slot machines at racetracks at about 50-50; while approximately 70-30 statewide favor the bill."We are asking all our representatives and senators across the state to think long and hard about the Tomlinson bill," Gregg said.


TimeSite.com powered by Trot.net

www.timesite.com [cached]

CAMP HILL, Pa. -- The current allocation of slot machine revenue to Pennsylvania's standardbred breeders amounts to about $7.2 million per year divided by more than 1,000 breeders across the state on average, Wayne Gregg, president of Eicarl's Stables, and a director of the Standardbred Breeders Association of Pennsylvania (SBAP), said on June 3.

"This amount wouldn't make a dent in our hay bill," Gregg, a horseman for nearly two decades, said jokingly.
But Gregg knows that slot machine revenue isn't a joking matter to more than 1,000 standardbred breeders across Pennsylvania.
Gregg's state association has been working to build awareness of the fact that the harness racing horse breeders across Pennsylvania are slowly going out of business and the current focus on licensing slot machines at the state's two harness tracks will probably be the last chance for Pennsylvania's breeders to reverse the trend.
"We were once the Keystone of harness racing in the Northeast," Gregg says, "but we lost the competitive edge when our neighbor states used slot machine revenue to boost their harness purses and breeder award programs."
Harness breeder revenue allocations in states like New Jersey, West Virginia and Canada give a greater return on investment to breeders who own farms there and breed winning horses in the those state races.
"A number of Pennsylvania breeders have started moving their operations out of state to take advantage of the more favorable economics elsewhere," Gregg said.
...
"Our land is worth at least ten times present value if we develop it," Gregg said.
...
One objective of the Tomlinson bill is to support the faltering Pennsylvania racing industry, but Gregg says the support is too little, too late for the Harness breeders in the state.
"We are the backbone of the Harness racing industry," he says."We are a vital part of a great industry, and if we go out of state, the legislature is simply trading off our green land and rural agricultural communities to increase gaming interests and revenue in the state.It's that simple in my book."
Gregg is careful to say that he and the SBAP support the Tomlinson bill in principal, even as they watched the breeder percentage of revenue disappear while track owner percentages continue to grow.
"I want a healthy, vibrant industry," Gregg says, "but it won't happen this way.Right now, this formula just boosts racinos, not horse racing."
"We need to get to around 4 percent in SB 20 for the numbers to make sense to us," he says.
...
Gregg and SBAP estimate that at around 4 percent, the return is great enough to trigger investment in PA farmland, and an immediate increase in breeding operations in the state.
"With a little luck at the harness races, I think you will see another 50,000 acres of prime land reclaimed for breeding farms, and I think we can reasonably turn that 4 percent into something like a 10 percent bump in jobs, and increased revenue to our rural communities," Gregg said.
Most recent polls show rural voter support of licensing slot machines at racetracks at about 50-50; while approximately 70-30 statewide favor the bill.
"We are asking all our representatives and senators across the state to think long and hard about the Tomlinson bill," Gregg said.


PA Horse Breeders Caught Between a Rock and a Hard Place in the Harness Racing Industry

www.standardbredbreederspa.org [cached]

"We are a vital part of a great industry, and if we go out of state, the legislature is simply trading off our green land and rural agricultural communities to increase gaming interests and revenue in the state," Gregg said.

(Camp Hill, PA) -- An allocation of two percent of slot machine revenue to Pennsylvania's standardbred breeders amounts to about $7.2 million per year divided by more than 1,000 breeders across the state on average, Wayne Gregg, president of Eicarl's Stables, in Pittsburgh, and a director of the Standardbred Breeders Association of Pennsylvania (SBAP), said today.
"This amount wouldn't make much of a dent in our hay bill," Gregg, a breeder for nearly two decades, said jokingly.
But Gregg knows that slot machine revenue isn't a joking matter to more than 1,000 standardbred breeders across Pennsylvania.
Gregg's state association has been working to build awareness of the fact that Pennsylvania harness racing horse breeders are slowly going out of business and the current focus on licensing slot machines at the state's two harness tracks will probably be the last chance for Pennsylvania to reverse the trend.
"We were once the Keystone of harness racing in the northeast," Gregg says, "but we lost the competitive edge when our neighboring states used slot machine revenue to boost their harness purses and breeder award programs."
"A number of PA breeders have been going out of business or moving their operations out of state to take advantage of the more favorable economics elsewhere," Gregg said.
...
"Our land is worth at least ten times present value if we develop it," Gregg said.
...
One objective of the Tomlinson bill is to support the faltering Pennsylvania racing industry, but Gregg says the support is too little, too late for the harness breeders in the state.
"We are the backbone of the harness racing industry," he says."We are a vital part of a great industry, and if we go out of state, the legislature is simply trading off our green land and rural agricultural communities to increase gaming interests and revenue in the state."
"It's that simple in my book."
Gregg is careful to say that he and the SBAP support the Tomlinson bill in principal, even as they watched the breeder percentage of revenue disappear while track owner percentages continue to grow.
"I want a healthy, vibrant industry," Gregg says, "but it won't happen this way.Right now, this formula just boosts racinos, not horse racing."
"We need to get to around 4% in SB 20 for the numbers to make sense to us," he says.
...
Gregg and SBAP estimate that at around 4%, the return is great enough to trigger investment in PA farmland, and an immediate increase in breeding operations in the state.
"With a little luck at the harness races, I think you will see another 50,000 acres of prime PA land reclaimed for breeding farms, and I think we can reasonably turn that 4% into something like a 10% bump in jobs, and increased revenue to our rural communities," Gregg said.
Most recent polls show rural voter support of licensing slot machines at racetracks at about 50-50; while approximately 70-30 statewide favor the bill.
"We are asking all our representatives and senators across the state to think long and hard about the Tomlinson bill," Gregg said.

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name

Other people with the name Gregg

Trevoir Gregg
RLJ Equity Partners LLC

Andres Gregg
Rotary International

Lesley Gregg
Thomson Reuters Corporation

Matt Gregg
Hall & Partners Limited

Thomas Gregg
Medium Rare Cleveland Park , LLC

City Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

People Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Company Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory