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Last Update

2006-12-14T00:00:00.000Z

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Background Information

Employment History

Position, Logistics Management
Marines

Part of the School System's Desegregation Plan
East Forsyth High School

Lexington State Bank

Lexington State Bank on Mountain Street

Education



East Forsyth High School

college degree

Campbell University

Web References (2 Total References)


Lexington State Bank

www.lsbnc.com [cached]

Warren Watts found direction in the military; he is a bank-branch manager

KERNERSVILLE
Warren Watts' life story is an inspirational example of how one young man overcame bad choices and found success in adulthood.
Watts graduated from East Forsyth High School in 1977, although 1975 should have been his graduation date.He was assigned to East Forsyth as part of the school system's desegregation plan, and he "mightily rebelled," Watts said.
"I had a difficult time.I got into trouble, didn't have a father figure, quit school and even ended up on probation," Watts said.
Unsure what to do with his life, he visited a Marine recruiter who took one look at Watts' high-school transcript and sent him back to school.Watts said he was two credits shy of having enough credits to graduate.He finished high school and returned to the recruiter.
"It was one of the best things that could happen to me," Watts said.
He spent 20 years in the Marine Corps, traveling all over the world.He was stationed in Cherry Point and Camp Lejeune.During his military service, he earned his college degree through Campbell University.
After retiring in 1997, Watts knew he could not rest while drawing his pension, he said.He had been involved with electrical repair in the Marines and considered becoming an electrician.
Instead, he went into retail sales by first working at a Revco Drug Store and then with Circuit City.
"I sold televisions and loved it.What man doesn't like to watch television?"Watts asked.
But it was an issue at his bank that led Watts into his second career.He went to the Bank of America with a complaint about his account and left with a job as a teller.
It turned out that banking was Watts' niche, mainly because of his love and success with customer service.
In six years, he has worked up to branch-operations manager at Lexington State Bank on Mountain Street.He first came to Kernersville with Center Carolina Bank, now SunTrust and went to work with LSB when CCB changed ownership.
"A college degree is what you do with it," Watts said.
...
Shannon Parker, a co-worker, said that Watts has strong ethics.
...
Watts said that his job puts him in a situation to help with the cultural change that is taking place in Kernersville.
"There is cultural change.It's all around.I've worked with a lot of diversity," Watts said."The military helped with that.You can have a dollar or a million dollars, and you'll get the same respect from me."
Watts, 49, has many blessings to count, including his son and daughter.His 26-year-old son, Warren II, is a second lieutenant working in logistics management for the Marines.He plans to use his military service to pay for law school.His daughter, Amanda, 18, is studying criminal justice at Forsyth Technical Community College and wants to be a police officer.
"The apple doesn't fall far from the tree," Watts said.


LSB The Bank - As Easy As LSB ::

www.lsbbancshares.com [cached]

Warren Watts found direction in the military; he is a bank-branch manager

KERNERSVILLE
Warren Watts' life story is an inspirational example of how one young man overcame bad choices and found success in adulthood.
Watts graduated from East Forsyth High School in 1977, although 1975 should have been his graduation date.He was assigned to East Forsyth as part of the school system's desegregation plan, and he "mightily rebelled," Watts said.
"I had a difficult time.I got into trouble, didn't have a father figure, quit school and even ended up on probation," Watts said.
Unsure what to do with his life, he visited a Marine recruiter who took one look at Watts' high-school transcript and sent him back to school.Watts said he was two credits shy of having enough credits to graduate.He finished high school and returned to the recruiter.
"It was one of the best things that could happen to me," Watts said.
He spent 20 years in the Marine Corps, traveling all over the world.He was stationed in Cherry Point and Camp Lejeune.During his military service, he earned his college degree through Campbell University.
After retiring in 1997, Watts knew he could not rest while drawing his pension, he said.He had been involved with electrical repair in the Marines and considered becoming an electrician.
Instead, he went into retail sales by first working at a Revco Drug Store and then with Circuit City.
"I sold televisions and loved it.What man doesn't like to watch television?"Watts asked.
But it was an issue at his bank that led Watts into his second career.He went to the Bank of America with a complaint about his account and left with a job as a teller.
It turned out that banking was Watts' niche, mainly because of his love and success with customer service.
In six years, he has worked up to branch-operations manager at Lexington State Bank on Mountain Street.He first came to Kernersville with Center Carolina Bank, now SunTrust and went to work with LSB when CCB changed ownership.
"A college degree is what you do with it," Watts said.
...
Shannon Parker, a co-worker, said that Watts has strong ethics.
...
Watts said that his job puts him in a situation to help with the cultural change that is taking place in Kernersville.
"There is cultural change.It's all around.I've worked with a lot of diversity," Watts said."The military helped with that.You can have a dollar or a million dollars, and you'll get the same respect from me."
Watts, 49, has many blessings to count, including his son and daughter.His 26-year-old son, Warren II, is a second lieutenant working in logistics management for the Marines.He plans to use his military service to pay for law school.His daughter, Amanda, 18, is studying criminal justice at Forsyth Technical Community College and wants to be a police officer.
"The apple doesn't fall far from the tree," Watts said.

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