Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Warren Leruth?

Warren Leruth

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

John Sexton


Director of Research and Development

Anderson Clayton Corp.


Baker's Assistant

Solari , Inc.


Affiliations

Le Ruth's Restaurant

Founder


LeRuth Extract Co.

Founder


Web References(68 Total References)


Warren Leruth:Genius in the Kitchen

www.texomaliving.com [cached]

Warren Leruth: Genius in the Kitchen
It was something Leruth had carefully worked out. He believed in the idea, in himself, and he believed Sherman was indeed ready for something more than the usual fare. Leruth had sweated every detail, and he knew it would work. So when he finished laying out his plans, he was not fazed by the banker's next question. "How are you going to run the restaurant? You've got a full-time job at Anderson Clayton. By my calculation, you'll be working from 5 a.m. to midnight five nights a week." That didn't matter. After a life already crammed with more than most men twice his age could have accomplished, Leruth was nothing if not supremely confident. He brushed aside the banker's skepticism. Here in Sherman, he was ready to begin a journey that would lead him to the heights of culinary celebrity, and nothing was going to get in the way. Leruth arrived in Sherman after a period of unsettled employment, but enormous professional growth. Since leaving home, he had had scores of jobs-later on he told people the number topped three hundred. His passion was food and cooking. One of his first jobs had been as a baker's assistant with Solari's in New Orleans, and he had been a baker in the National Guard and later, on active military duty, a mess hall supervisor. His experience was considerable. Eventually, he had landed a job as a bakery service man with Proctor and Gamble, and he leveraged that to a position with Anderson Clayton and Company as a bulk oil and shortening salesman. From his base in Shreveport, he was responsible for a four-state territory. Eddie Cahan joined Anderson Clayton about the same time as Leruth, and in January 1956, the pair attended a mandatory bakery school at the company's Sherman plant. "With his experience as a baker, Warren was the star of the class," said Cahan. Cahan explained that Leruth was more of an advisor to the high-end hotel pastry chefs and bakeries in his territory than a traditional salesman. Warren and his wife, Marie, bought their first home in Irving. Larry, their first child, was born in 1957, and later that year, they took the first vacation of their married life. Reflecting on that modest excursion to the beaches of Biloxi, Mississippi, Leruth later wrote "I think at that point in our life, we were just starting to get our heads above water. We were accumulating a bit of money. Life was good for us." After a year and a half in Irving, Leruth was getting restless. Leruth resigned almost immediately when the company took away four of his largest accounts. Someone at Charles Dennery saw potential in the young man, and not necessarily as a salesman. They did not want to lose him, so they offered him a job in research and development. "I worked with a fellow by the name of Fred Smedley, a very fine fellow from Oklahoma," Leruth later recalled. Others recognized Leruth was someone special. When the owner of Bakery Service, another New Orleans bakery supply house offered Leruth a chance to buy ten percent of the company and to set up a small manufacturing department, he jumped at the opportunity and left Charles Dennery. Working for Bakery Service, he sold his products during the week and, with one helper, manufactured what he had sold on the weekends. Leruth's manufacturing experience at Charles Dennery and Bakery Service opened the door for a second career at Anderson Clayton. Mike Deck, head of research and development for food division, knew that Leruth's manufacturing experience, coupled with his unstoppable energy, could contribute to the success of a new salad dressing product line being developed in Sherman. Rehired by Deck in 1961, Leruth reported to Senior Researcher Carter Harrer, an able, but quiet and reserved scientist. Leruth later credited Harrer with teaching him to scientifically formulate recipes. But the important breakthrough was Leruth's. "It was here that I made my first patent on stabilization of high oil-content salad dressings that would remain pourable. The company was very happy with the work, and it gave us a complete edge against all of our competition. Many years later, when Leruth was inducted into MenuMaster's Hall of Fame, he stated this breakthrough was one of his top career accomplishments. Kuska and Leruth immediately hit it off. One of their first accomplishments was a name, Seven Seas®, suggested by Leruth during a brainstorming session. They had great personal empathy, respected each other's skills and knowledge, worked together effectively and often, in innovative ways. "I would sometimes write advertisements for products that didn't exist, and Warren would formulate recipes which matched the advertisements," Kuska recalled. Although Leruth was the first to propose Green Goddess as the lead in the product line, their collaboration resulted in other flavors, such as Creamy Italian and Thousand Island. They found that Leruth had an astonishing acuity of taste and could easily distinguish flavors consisting of one ten thousandth of a gram in a fifteen ton batch. Leruth's time at Anderson Clayton in Sherman was the point at which his early ambitions to be a scientist intersected with his chosen profession as a chef. As a testament to his contribution, the Seven Seas® product line, now owned by Kraft Foods, Inc., still ranks among the top in sales of salad dressings in the United States. Remembering Sherman In a memoir dictated in retirement, Leruth remembered the years in Sherman. When Mayor Ralph Elliott discovered that Leruth was an Eagle Scout, the mayor convinced him to lead a troop sponsored by the First Methodist Church. "I had two very fine assistants," said Leruth. "Warren was a real chef. With the Seven Seas® product line migrating from R&D to manufacturing, Leruth needed another outlet for his energy and ambition. Leruth planned his restaurant for a year and a half, reaching into his experience for inspiration, dreaming and constantly refining every detail. He chose LeRuth's as the name because the spelling looked more French. Reflecting lessons learned at one of his first employers, the legendary New Orleans restaurant Galatoire's, his formula for success was quality, consistency, and simplicity. Every element of the plan would contribute to customer satisfaction and repeat business. LeRuth's opened in May 1963, with Sherman Mayor Ralph Elliott presiding over the grand opening ceremony and ribbon cutting. A small group of well-wishers, including friends, Anderson Clayton colleagues, and professional chefs, attended. Leruth radiated excitement. As he looked up at the LeRuth's sign, he knew he was closer to his most heart-felt desire: to provide a better life for his beloved wife and children. "Warren had very detailed requirements for every aspect of the building, kitchen and finishes. From the Chicago brick used in the walkway and the ironwork that enclosed the courtyard to the electrical specifications in the kitchen, he had definite ideas about what he wanted." LeRuth's was designed for fine dining. The interior, calming and soothing, was decorated with great care in a sophisticated, neutral color palette. A courtyard garden and fountain were visible through a glass curtain wall year round. In winter, a fire danced in the fireplace. Original art by local artists graced the walls and was rotated regularly. Contemporary French music, heavy on the accordion and evocative of another place and time, played softly in the background. Leruth located elegant Thonet® bentwood chairs in Dallas, but when he could not find tables of the right size, he built fifteen of them himself. Everything about what went on the tabletop was important. He agonized over the selection of dishes, glassware, silverware and linen. Was the glassware beautiful and light enough? Was the silverware balanced and heavy enough? Would the linen hold up to daily use and laundering? Could he afford what he wanted? The kitchen was his domain. As a food supervisor in the US Army, he had been responsible for weekly inspections of eighty mess halls and their supervisors. He understood the need for order and cleanliness, and he wanted his kitchen to be a model. Months before the restaurant opened, he chased down leads on commercial stoves and other used equipment, and having once sold pots and pans, he knew where to buy t


menumasters.lifeware.com

Warren LeruthProfile: An industry icon, Warren Leruth has garnered the respect of chefs and research and development executives nationwide during a varied 50-year foodservice career.A successful chef and product developer, Leruth operated the renowned LeRuth's restaurant in New Orleans from 1966 to 1982.Today his consulting work includes developing products for companies like Outback Steakhouse, Burger King, Brinker International and many more. Warren LeruthDuring his 50-year career, Warren Leruth has worked in many areas of the foodservice industry, but first and foremost he has been a food product developer. During a 50-year foodservice career Warren Leruth has done many things.Indeed, he has developed products, fostered innovation, operated a restaurant, written cookbooks, consulted for food organizations and been a taste specialist.But that is not all he's done; he also has given generously to charity and come to the aid of friends. Now he's been tapped by Nation's Restaurant News as the first inductee into the MenuMasters Hall of Fame."I love R&D and always have," Leruth says."It's creative and involves a lot of calculations and numbers, which I enjoy." Throughout his varied career the 69-year-old Leruth has been first and foremost a food product developer."Research is a much calmer field than running a restaurant," he says, recalling his years as owner-operator of the famed LeRuth's Restaurant in Gretna on New Orleans' West Bank."With R&D you have your hand in food all the time but at a different level." The new Hall of Famer continues to set a brisk pace through life.From his well-equipped home kitchen in Pass Christian, Miss., he develops and consults on products for Outback Steakhouse, Boston Chicken, Brinker International, Burger King and many other restaurant chains. Always outspoken, Leruth says: "One of the toughest challenges in foodservice today is the American hamburger.There's light years of work to be done with the quality and grind of meat and the overall fat." Leruth's philosophy is that "whatever you eat must have a happy ending.Back home, Leruth worked in the research kitchens of Proctor & Gamble; Chas.Dennery & Co., a well-known Deep South bakery; and the Texas firm of Anderson-Clayton.While at Anderson-Clayton, he developed something that's taken for granted today -- a pourable, non-separating dressing, which eventually became the Seven Seas line of salad dressings. Today he looks back on that breakthrough as one of his top career accomplishments.He also credits Carter Harrer, Anderson-Clayton's director of R&D, for teaching him how to formulate recipes. In 1963 Leruth became the youngest member of the national chef fraternity, the Order of the Golden Toque.Three years later he opened LeRuth's Restaurant.With little advertising or fanfare the place soon was packed night after night.For five consecutive years LeRuth's was honored with the prestigious Travel/Holiday Award. His dream realized, Leruth sold the restaurant to his sons in 1982 and retired."But I got bored," he says.He was spurred by a remarkable initiative, and the projects quickly mounted up.He started the LeRuth Extract Co., making and marketing his Vanilla Bean Marinade and pure vanilla extract.And as if that weren't enough, he developed Chelsey's Frozen Custard, a soft ice-cream emporium. He has written two cookbooks and today continues his work with the Chefs' Charity for Children, a foundation he established two decades ago to benefit the St. Michael's Special School.The charity has raised more than $1.2 million, and Leruth says, "I'm very proud of the New Orleans chefs who contribute their time and products each year to our fund-raising event. Anthony Athanas, the famed Boston restaurateur and owner of Anthony's Pier 4 restaurant, recalls a time when Leruth was there for him.In 1978, when a blizzard sank the antique riverboat that Athanas had anchored alongside Pier 4 as a cocktail lounge, Leruth was quick to help.Although Athanas never accepted the generous offer of money, the Boston restaurateur remembers the gesture every time he talks to Leruth. Making the journey with Leruth for 43 years has been his wife, the former Marie Rizzuto, a New Orleans native, like her husband.Leruth says she's the cook in the family, and he still enjoys the traditional New Orleans food that he grew up on."You know, red beans and rice on Mondays," he says, chuckling. The birth of their children is the first thing that comes to Leruth's mind when he is asked to review his life and career.Their son, 41-year-old Larry Leruth, is chief meat inspector for Outback Steakhouse and a part-time associate in Leruth's consulting operation, LeRuths' & Associates.Another son, Lee Rene, committed suicide at 29, a blow that still resonates in Leruth's mind."That's so painful," he says.


Event history

www.menumasters.com [cached]

Warren Leruth - An industry icon, Warren Leruth has garnered the respect of chefs and research and development executives nationwide during a varied 50-year foodservice career.
A successful chef and product developer, Leruth operated the renowned LeRuth's restaurant in New Orleans from 1966 to 1982. Today his consulting work includes developing products for companies like Outback Steakhouse, Burger King, Brinker International and many more.


Past Winners

www.menumasters.com [cached]

1998 - Warren LeRuth


This Years Winner

www.menumasters.com [cached]

Warren Leruth
During a 50-year foodservice career Warren Leruth has done many things. Indeed, he has developed products, fostered innovation, operated a restaurant, written cookbooks, consulted for food organizations and been a taste specialist. But that is not all he's done; he also has given generously to charity and come to the aid of friends. Now he's been tapped by Nation's Restaurant News as the first inductee into the MenuMasters Hall of Fame. "I love R&D and always have," Leruth says. "It's creative and involves a lot of calculations and numbers, which I enjoy." Throughout his varied career the 69-year-old Leruth has been first and foremost a food product developer. "Research is a much calmer field than running a restaurant," he says, recalling his years as owner-operator of the famed LeRuth's Restaurant in Gretna on New Orleans' West Bank. "With R&D you have your hand in food all the time but at a different level." The new Hall of Famer continues to set a brisk pace through life. From his well-equipped home kitchen in Pass Christian, Miss., he develops and consults on products for Outback Steakhouse, Boston Chicken, Brinker International, Burger King and many other restaurant chains. Always outspoken, Leruth says: "One of the toughest challenges in foodservice today is the American hamburger. There's light years of work to be done with the quality and grind of meat and the overall fat." Leruth's philosophy is that "whatever you eat must have a happy ending. Back home, Leruth worked in the research kitchens of Proctor & Gamble; Chas. Dennery & Co., a well-known Deep South bakery; and the Texas firm of Anderson-Clayton. While at Anderson-Clayton, he developed something that's taken for granted today -- a pourable, non-separating dressing, which eventually became the Seven Seas line of salad dressings. Today he looks back on that breakthrough as one of his top career accomplishments. He also credits Carter Harrer, Anderson-Clayton's director of R&D, for teaching him how to formulate recipes. In 1963 Leruth became the youngest member of the national chef fraternity, the Order of the Golden Toque. Three years later he opened LeRuth's Restaurant. With little advertising or fanfare the place soon was packed night after night. For five consecutive years LeRuth's was honored with the prestigious Travel/Holiday Award. His dream realized, Leruth sold the restaurant to his sons in 1982 and retired. "But I got bored," he says. He was spurred by a remarkable initiative, and the projects quickly mounted up. He started the LeRuth Extract Co., making and marketing his Vanilla Bean Marinade and pure vanilla extract. And as if that weren't enough, he developed Chelsey's Frozen Custard, a soft ice-cream emporium. He has written two cookbooks and today continues his work with the Chefs' Charity for Children, a foundation he established two decades ago to benefit the St. Michael's Special School. The charity has raised more than $1.2 million, and Leruth says, "I'm very proud of the New Orleans chefs who contribute their time and products each year to our fund-raising event. Anthony Athanas, the famed Boston restaurateur and owner of Anthony's Pier 4 restaurant, recalls a time when Leruth was there for him. In 1978, when a blizzard sank the antique riverboat that Athanas had anchored alongside Pier 4 as a cocktail lounge, Leruth was quick to help. Making the journey with Leruth for 43 years has been his wife, the former Marie Rizzuto, a New Orleans native, like her husband. Leruth says she's the cook in the family, and he still enjoys the traditional New Orleans food that he grew up on. "You know, red beans and rice on Mondays," he says, chuckling. The birth of their children is the first thing that comes to Leruth's mind when he is asked to review his life and career.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory