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This profile was last updated on 6/13/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Tracey J. Shors

Wrong Dr. Tracey J. Shors?

Professor In the Department of Ps...

Local Address: NEW BRUNSWICK, New Jersey, United States
Rutgers University
57 U.S. Highway 1
New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901
United States

Company Description: With major campuses in northern, central, and southern New Jersey and extension offices and activities in all twenty-one counties, Rutgers is the flagship...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • PhD
  • Ph.D.
  • bachelor degrees , biology and psychology
    University of Alabama
  • doctorate , Physiological Psychology
    University of Southern California
183 Total References
Web References
Aging
therapytoronto.ca, 13 June 2014 [cached]
According to a recently published study in Frontiers in Neuroscience, Rutgers behavioral and systems neuroscientist Tracey Shors, who co-authored the study, found that the newborn brain cells in young rats that were successful at learning survived while the same brain cells in animals that didn't master the task died quickly.
"In those that didn't learn, three weeks after the new brain cells were made, nearly one-half of them were no longer there," said Shors, professor in the Department of Psychology and Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers. "But in those that learned, it was hard to count. There were so many that were still alive."
The study is important, Shors says, because it suggests that the massive proliferation of new brain cells most likely helps young animals leave the protectiveness of their mothers and face dangers, challenges and opportunities of adulthood.
Scientists have known for years that the neurons in adult rats, which are significant but fewer in numbers than during puberty, could be saved with learning, but they did not know if this would be the case for young rats that produce two to four times more neurons than adult animals.
By examining the hippocampus - a portion of the brain associated with the process of learning - after the rats learned to associate a sound with a motor response, scientists found that the new brain cells injected with dye a few weeks earlier were still alive in those that had learned the task while the cells in those who had failed did not survive.
"It's not that learning makes more cells," says Shors. "It's that the process of learning keeps new cells alive that are already present at the time of the learning experience."
Since the process of producing new brain cells on a cellular level is similar in animals, including humans, Shors says ensuring that adolescent children learn at optimal levels is critical.
"What it has shown me, especially as an educator, is how difficult it is to achieve optimal learning for our students. You don't want the material to be too easy to learn and yet still have it too difficult where the student doesn't learn and gives up," Shors says.
So, what does this mean for the 12-year-old adolescent boy or girl?
While scientists can't measure individual brain cells in humans, Shors says this study, on the cellular level, provides a look at what is happening in the adolescent brain and provides a window into the amazing ability the brain has to reorganize itself and form new neural connections at such a transformational time in our lives.
"Adolescents are trying to figure out who they are now, who they want to be when they grow up and are at school in a learning environment all day long," says Shors.
According to a recent study in ...
www.dailypioneer.com, 1 June 2014 [cached]
According to a recent study in Frontiers in Neuroscience, Rutgers behavioural and systems neuroscientist Tracey Shors, who co-authored the study, found that newborn brain cells in young rats that were successful at learning survived while the same brain cells in animals that didn't master the task died quickly. "In those that didn't learn, three weeks after the new brain cells were made, nearly one-half of them were no longer there," said Shors, professor in the Department of Psychology and Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers.
Tracey J. Shors, a ...
www.theatlantic.com, 13 Jan 2014 [cached]
Tracey J. Shors, a psychologist at the Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers University, has reported that while many activities can increase the rate at which new brain cells are born, only effortful, successful learning increases their survival. As she said at a meeting on "Cognitive Enhancers" at the Society for Neuroscience in 2012: "You can make new cells with exercise, Prozac and sex.
Tracey Shors, Ph.D., ...
www.princetonoccasion.org, 19 Oct 2011 [cached]
Tracey Shors, Ph.D., neuroscientist, Rutgers University
Tracey J. Shors, ...
gurianinstitute.com, 27 Dec 2013 [cached]
Tracey J. Shors, Ph.D. Department of Psychology
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