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Wrong Tracey Shors?

Tracey J. Shors

Professor In Behavioral and Systems Neuroscience In the Department of Psychology and Center for Collaborative Neuroscience

Rutgers University

HQ Phone:  (973) 353-5205

Direct Phone: (848) ***-****direct phone

Email: s***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Rutgers University

100 Joyce Kilmer Avenue

Piscataway, New Jersey,08854

United States

Company Description

Established in 1766, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is America's eighth oldest institution of higher learning. The Rutgers system educates more than 65,000 students and serves the people of New Jersey at universities, research centers and clinica...more

Web References(191 Total References)


Richard Thompson, PhD - FABBS

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Tracey J. Shors, Rutgers University


HealthEmotions Research Institute

www.healthemotions.org [cached]

Tracey Shors
Tracey J. Shors, Ph.D. Distinguished Professor Behavioral and Systems Neuroscientist Department of Psychology Center for Collaborative Neuroscience Dr. Tracey J. Shors is Distinguished Professor in Behavioral and Systems Neuroscience in the Department of Psychology and Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers University. With close to 150 scientific publications, Dr. Shors has focused most of her career on discovering neuronal mechanisms through which the brain learns and learning to recover from stressful life experience. Nearly two decades ago now, it was "rediscovered" that the brain continues to produce new neurons throughout life, a process known as neurogenesis. Dr. Shors was the first to associate these new neurons with processes of learning and memory. Her laboratory further determined that learning keeps new neurons alive - but only if learning both successful and effortful. These findings relate to the popular expression, "use it or lose it." Dr. Shors also studies sex differences in the brain. Nearly twenty years ago, she reported that learning and plasticity in females can be especially vulnerable to stressful life experience. These sex differences are mediated by different brain circuits and are sensitive to virginity, motherhood and hormonal changes across the female lifespan. Because sexual violence is so prevalent among women, Dr. Shors more recently developed a laboratory model known as SCAR (Sexual Conspecific Aggressive Response) to study the consequences of sexual aggression and violence on the female brain and behavior. She recently reported that sexually aggressive experiences with an adult male have a significant impact on learning, maternal behavior and neurogenesis in young females. Dr. Shors and a team of Rutgers scientists have translated these data on neurogenesis and stress into a clinical intervention known as MAP Training, which stands for Mental and Physical Training. The program combines 30-min of silent focused-attention meditation with 30-min of aerobic exercise. She has so far provided MAP Training to young adults with depression, young homeless mothers, healthy adults and most recently, college women on campus who have experienced sexual violence. Overall, MAP Training is associated with positive changes in brain, heart and mental health. Outside of research, Dr. Shors exercises and meditates. She is a meditation facilitator certified by Soshimsa Zen Center, as well as being a certified instructor for Zumba and MixxedFit aerobic exercise programs. She is a mother who studies motherhood in her lab and loves to travel, especially to obscure places in Asia.


Journey into the Male & Female Brain: An Interview with Tracey Shors - Wild River Review

www.wildriverreview.com [cached]

An Interview with Tracey Shors
So I ask Tracey Shors, Professor of Psychology and prominent neuroscientist at the Center for Collaborative Neuroscience at Rutgers University, a woman with a bright gleam in her eye, and a formidable publication list, "Is nature or nurture even the right question?" Shors and I stand, appropriately, in the middle of a walk-through hippocampus in Quark Park, or rather two hippocampi (one male and one female) - that part of the brain where learning and memory occur. The curving walls of her installation, two sets of interlocking Cs constructed of gigantic bamboo sticks, include decorations of actual microscopic portrayals of the hippocampus - a beautiful structure with three main sites where unique types of cells live. Shors playfully admits that the subject of her exhibit "Learning in the Hippocampus" owes its inspiration to the 1966 Isaac Asimov movie, Fantastic Voyage. When brainstorming themes for Quark Park, Shors initially thought to herself, "Wouldn't it be phenomenal if you could step inside the hippocampus and actually see what was going on"? Within the figurative hippocampus, Tracey Shors spends much of her research time examining any of the following phenomena: how and why learning and memory occur; neurogenesis (the formation of new brain cells) and how learning helps the new cells survive; as well as how the male and the female hippocampi differ. "Did you know," she asks with a grin "that the female brain can exhibit very different responses than the male hippocampus?" About such highly complicated (and controversial) questions, Shors exhibits the accomplished scientist's ease in breaking down highly technical material into clear comprehensible English. But, true to her scientific training, Shors is highly cautious about making overly simplistic deductions about the incredibly elusive, ever dynamic brain. SHORS - Journey into the Male & Female Brain: An Interview with Tracey Shors


Aerobic and Mental Training (MAP Training) for Brain Fitness

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Work by Dr Tracey Shors at Rutgers has found more generally that these new brain cells are useful to us for learning and memory when "task demands are high (e.g. complex and hard), and mastering them depends on cognitive flexibility".
Dr. Shors and her colleagues have researched two effective types of mental training that build on the brain cell-producing effects of aerobic exercise: focused-attention (FA) meditation and app based brain training. Effective brain training IQ HIT icon Dr Shors asks:


Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology

www.sbne.org [cached]

Tracy Shors, Rutgers University


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