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Wrong Toril Aalberg?

Toril Aalberg

Professor

NTNU

Email: t***@***.no

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

NTNU

Web References(15 Total References)


Political news is hard to understand | ScienceNordic

sciencenordic.com [cached]

In collaboration with Toril Aalberg, professor in media sociology at NTNU, she looked at the media's use of experts as sources in their political news coverage.
Half of Norwegian voters are usually undecided about which party to vote for until the last weeks before an election. This makes coverage of politics all the more important during these periods. Grøttum and Aalberg searched the four media for difficult concepts and metaphors that were not explained in news items. According to Aalberg a rather large share of the political news stories in the papers and on TV called for a considerable amount of previous knowledge. You need to know who the politicians are, their positions in the political landscape, and you have to recognise political terminology and political metaphors," she says. "Without that prior knowledge it's hard to comprehend what the news is about." "This is no problem for people who are interested in politics," says Aalberg. She thinks a lot of political journalism is alienating for the many who aren't particularly interested. It can even make this large share of the voters less interested in politics. Aalberg is also aware of the dilemma facing journalists and the media. "The days are over when the public 'had to' see the news if they wanted to watch TV," says Aalberg. Professor Toril Aalberg has previously conducted research pointing in the direction of this being an unwise move. Grøttum and Aalberg have also collaborated in an investigation of the use of political analysts or commentators. "These analysts obviously utilise a vocabulary that makes many political stories harder to undertsand," says Aalberg. "We found a striking difference between these two groups," says Aalberg. Toril Aalberg's profile at NTNU View the discussion thread.


ICA || Leadership

www.politicalcommunication.org [cached]

Toril Aalberg, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway (Chair)


www.scienceeurope.org

Toril Aalberg, Professor of Sociology at the Department of Sociology and Political Science at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Oslo, Norway
Toril Aalberg graduated in Political Science (2001) and is currently Professor of Sociology. She has had visiting appointments at Stanford University, Trinity College Dublin and the Centre for Advanced Studies in Oslo. She has been a Board member of the National Council for Media Studies (since 2006) and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services (since 2007). She has been a member of the Review Panel of the Nordic Collaborative Research Projects (since 2006) and of the Velux Fonden (since 2011).


www.norwaypost.no

That's why the gap is still biggest in Norway, despite Norwegian women knowing more about politics than both American and Canadian men," says Toril Aalberg at the Norwegian Technical University, who has been in charge of the Norwegian part of the survey.


Membership Directory - ISPP.org

www.ispp.org [cached]

Toril Aalberg


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