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2016-11-18T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Tonya Clauss?

Dr. Tonya M. Clauss

Director, Animal Health

Georgia Aquarium Inc

Direct Phone: (404) ***-****       

Email: t***@***.org

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Georgia Aquarium Inc

225 Baker Street

Atlanta, Georgia 30313

United States

Company Description

Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that contains more than 10 million gallons of water and has the largest collection of aquatic animals. Georgia Aquarium's mission is to be a scientific institution that entertains and educ ... more

Find other employees at this company (575)

Background Information

Employment History

Staff Veterinarian

Mote Marine Laboratory Inc

Affiliations

Member
Association of Exotic Mammal Veterinarians

Member
American Veterinary Medical Association

Student Liaison Committee Member
International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine

Member
Association of Zoos and Aquariums

Member
American Association of Zoological Veterinarians

Education

Animal Science and Wildlife Ecology

University of Florida

Bachelor of Science degree

Agriculture

University of Florida

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree

University of Florida Department of Veterinary Medicine

MS

Master of Science degree

Engineering

University of Florida Department of Veterinary Medicine

doctorate in veterinary medicine

University of Florida

doctorate in veterinary medicine

University of Florida , College of Veterinary Medicine

dual bachelor’s degrees

Animal Science and Wildlife Ecology & Conservation

University of Florida

master’s degree

Environmental Engineering Sciences with a focus on Wetland’s Ecology

Web References (97 Total References)


Georgia Aquarium | Newsroom | Our Experts

www.georgiaaquarium.org [cached]

Dr. Tonya Clauss

...
Dr. Tonya Clauss Chief Veterinarian
...
Tonya M. Clauss
Tonya Clauss Director, Animal Health
As the Director of Animal Health at Georgia Aquarium, Dr. Tonya Clauss serves as the head clinical veterinarian. She supervises a team of 7 staff and manages daily operations in the veterinary diagnostic laboratory and hospital.
Clauss received dual bachelor’s degrees in Animal Science and Wildlife Ecology & Conservation from the University of Florida in 1996 and 1997 with a minor in chemistry. In 2003, she received her doctorate in veterinary medicine from the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine and received the Learner Family Wildlife Conservation Award for excellence in wildlife and zoological medicine. In 2004, she finished a master’s degree in Environmental Engineering Sciences with a focus on Wetland’s Ecology.
Clauss’ veterinary medicine career began in 1994 when she started working as a veterinary assistant for the Williston Veterinary Clinic in Florida. She also worked as a veterinary and research assistant at the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine from 1995 - 2002. After graduation from veterinary school in 2003, Clauss accepted a position as staff veterinarian at the Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium in Sarasota, Florida. In early 2004, she was hired as director of veterinary services for Pelican Man’s Bird Sanctuary, a wildlife rehabilitation facility also in Sarasota. While at this position, Clauss became a research affiliate at The Florida Aquarium in Tampa, a position she held until December 2007. In February 2005, Clauss began working at the Georgia Aquarium as an associate veterinarian and assistant manager of veterinary services. She was promoted to Chief Veterinarian and Manager of Clinical Services in 2007. In January 2012, she was promoted to Director, Animal Health.
Clauss has received specialized training in numerous areas such reptile critical care, immunology for aquatic animals and aquatic invertebrate medicine. She teaches veterinary courses at institutions such as University of Georgia, University of Tennessee, University of Florida, Shark Reef Aquarium at Mandalay Bay and MARVET at St. Matthews University in Grand Cayman. Clauss is an author or coauthor on numerous scientific articles as well as two book chapters. She has participated in or directed numerous scientific studies with animals including sea turtles, sharks and penguins. Based on her accomplishments since graduating from veterinary and graduate school, she was awarded an Outstanding Young Alumnus award from the University of Florida in 2009.
Clauss is a member of numerous professional organizations, including the American Veterinary Medical Association, the American Association of Zoological Veterinarians, the International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine and the Association of Exotic Mammal Veterinarians. She currently serves as a student liaison committee member for the International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine and is a research committee member at the Georgia Aquarium.


Georgia Aquarium - Nandi The Manta Ray - Meet the Team

www.georgiaaquarium.org [cached]

Dr. Tonya Clauss


Georgia Aquarium | Newsroom | Our Experts

www.georgiaaquarium.org [cached]

Dr. Tonya Clauss

...
Dr. Tonya Clauss Chief Veterinarian
...
Tonya M. Clauss
Tonya Clauss Director, Animal Health
As the Director of Animal Health at Georgia Aquarium, Dr. Tonya Clauss serves as the head clinical veterinarian. She supervises a team of 7 staff and manages daily operations in the veterinary diagnostic laboratory and hospital.
Clauss received dual bachelor’s degrees in Animal Science and Wildlife Ecology & Conservation from the University of Florida in 1996 and 1997 with a minor in chemistry. In 2003, she received her doctorate in veterinary medicine from the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine and received the Learner Family Wildlife Conservation Award for excellence in wildlife and zoological medicine. In 2004, she finished a master’s degree in Environmental Engineering Sciences with a focus on Wetland’s Ecology.
Clauss’ veterinary medicine career began in 1994 when she started working as a veterinary assistant for the Williston Veterinary Clinic in Florida. She also worked as a veterinary and research assistant at the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine from 1995 - 2002. After graduation from veterinary school in 2003, Clauss accepted a position as staff veterinarian at the Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium in Sarasota, Florida. In early 2004, she was hired as director of veterinary services for Pelican Man’s Bird Sanctuary, a wildlife rehabilitation facility also in Sarasota. While at this position, Clauss became a research affiliate at The Florida Aquarium in Tampa, a position she held until December 2007. In February 2005, Clauss began working at the Georgia Aquarium as an associate veterinarian and assistant manager of veterinary services. She was promoted to Chief Veterinarian and Manager of Clinical Services in 2007. In January 2012, she was promoted to Director, Animal Health.
Clauss has received specialized training in numerous areas such reptile critical care, immunology for aquatic animals and aquatic invertebrate medicine. She teaches veterinary courses at institutions such as University of Georgia, University of Tennessee, University of Florida, Shark Reef Aquarium at Mandalay Bay and MARVET at St. Matthews University in Grand Cayman. Clauss is an author or coauthor on numerous scientific articles as well as two book chapters. She has participated in or directed numerous scientific studies with animals including sea turtles, sharks and penguins. Based on her accomplishments since graduating from veterinary and graduate school, she was awarded an Outstanding Young Alumnus award from the University of Florida in 2009.
Clauss is a member of numerous professional organizations, including the American Veterinary Medical Association, the American Association of Zoological Veterinarians, the International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine and the Association of Exotic Mammal Veterinarians. She currently serves as a student liaison committee member for the International Association for Aquatic Animal Medicine and is a research committee member at the Georgia Aquarium.


Lafeber Company Veterinary Student Program « LafeberVet.com

www.lafebervet.com [cached]

Tonya Clauss, chief clinical veterinarian of the Georgia Aquarium

...
Dr. Clauss presented talks on marine mammal and elasmobranch medicine. She also led a teleost diagnostic techniques laboratory (shown here).


Diving into Veterinary Medicine at the Georgia Aquarium | Ichabod Ink

www.ichabodink.com [cached]

Dr. Clauss is the Chief Clinician for Veterinary Services at the Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta-the world's largest aquarium with more than 8 million gallons of water and approximately 80,000 animals.

"It's very different from working with dogs and cats and horses," Dr. Clauss said of her job. "Most of my patients don't really like me that much. A lot of them are not all that happy for me to touch them. You don't get to cuddle them."
Yet being an aquatic animal veterinarian has different rewards-like solving mysteries and being the first to learn something new about a species. For example, Dr. Clauss and her team recently conducted biopsies on tissue from bonnethead sharks to help figure out why they have sores on their tails.
"I suspect that it is a viral problem," Dr. Clauss explained. "But if these were dogs, someone would already know what it is."
The whale shark-the largest fish in the world-is another species that researchers know very little about. Dr. Clauss and her team are making discoveries about it, too. "We are collecting blood samples and doing health assessments that other people aren't doing," Dr. Clauss said. "We are the only place that pulls them out of the water to do any of that."
The Georgia Aquarium has special equipment that allows veterinary staff to lift its four whale sharks-which can grow up to 40 feet in length-to the water's surface to conduct physical exams. The researchers hope their studies will lead to a better understanding of the nutritional needs, biology, feeding behavior, migration patterns, and population of these animals.
In addition to this type of investigative research, Dr. Clauss also provides routine care for the animals, such as vaccinating sea otters against distemper, making sure a whale's blow hole is clean, and treating injuries.
"Animals do pick on one another," Dr. Clauss said. "Sometimes one fish bites another, or penguins get into a scuffle."
The Georgia Aquarium contains about 500 species. While Dr. Clauss enjoys the variety of working with all of them, she has a special place in her heart for Nandi, a manta ray she helped transport from South Africa.
Nandi nearly died after she was caught in a shark exclusion net, which is used to keep sharks away from beachgoing tourists. Staff at uShaka Marine World in Durban, South Africa, rescued Nandi from the net and nursed her back to health, but eventually the young fish outgrew her 580,000-gallon exhibit. Releasing Nandi into the ocean was not an option because, having become comfortable around people, she easily could have become trapped in a shark net again. So in August 2008, Nandi was transported 9,000 miles by plane from South Africa to Atlanta and now lives in the Georgia Aquarium's 6.3-million-gallon Ocean Voyager gallery. Measuring about 10 feet wide, Nandi dwarfs the other rays in the tank.
"She is the coolest animal. She is a princess," Dr. Clauss said. "When you would first start feeding her, she was so enthusiastic, it was like a child with an ice cream cone."
Because Nandi is so well oriented to people, she usually swims right in front of anyone standing at the tank, putting her eye up against the glass.
Surprisingly, none of Dr. Clauss' 11 pets is an aquatic animal. She has two horses, five dogs, two cats, an African gray parrot, and a leopard tortoise.
Besides Dr. Clauss, the Georgia Aquarium clinical veterinary team includes six others-the chief veterinary officer and senior vice president for research and conservation, an associate veterinarian, a veterinary intern, and three veterinarian technicians.
Dr. Clauss says the field of aquatic animal veterinary medicine is relatively young and small: There are probably no more than a couple of hundred aquatic veterinary positions worldwide, many of which have a strong research component. She herself has a master's degree in environmental engineering science with a focus in wetlands ecology to complement her veterinary medicine degree.

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