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This profile was last updated on 5/12/07  and contains information from public web pages.
 
Background

Employment History

  • Engineer
    NASA
  • Scientist and Engineer
    NASA
8 Total References
Web References
Amazing New Energy Inventions
www.weboflove.org, 12 May 2007 [cached]
"I believe it'll change the world," said second-generation inventor Tom Woodbridge, a NASA engineer.
The Bellingham Herald | news | | NASA scientist pries electricity from sea
www.bellinghamherald.com, 7 Dec 2005 [cached]
NASA scientist and engineer Tom Woodbridge uses his invention, the Ocean Swell and Wave Energy Conversion system, to create electrical power illuminating the navigation light on the power buoy.
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"I believe it'll change the world," said second-generation inventor Tom Woodbridge, a NASA engineer.He knows of about 20 other companies trying to do the same thing.Alternative energy is in the forefront again as high fuel costs after Hurricane Katrina wreak havoc on the nation's oil refineries and Americans' walletsWoodbridge, a bookish 45-year-old with wire glasses whose old Hobie surfboard hangs in the den above his computer, is chasing an elusive prize that his father, David, now 84 and retired, never caught.
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Tom Woodbridge is now making a final push toward making his father's dream a reality.His father's idea, to use the rocking motion of the waves to generate electricity, came from looking at his son's Slinky toy back in 1972.After noticing how easily it transferred energy, he thought, why not use something like the Slinky as a coil that rocks?It's a radical departure from most attempts at ocean-based electric generators, which try to use the force of the waves to turn a wheel.Tom Woodbridge's system is slightly different.Think Pogo Stick inside a floating drum.
Conserv-A-Store
www.conservastore.com, 1 Dec 2005 [cached]
"I believe it'll change the world," said second-generation inventor Tom Woodbridge, a NASA engineer.
The renewed interest in finding cheap, plentiful and renewable energy has rekindled interest in the work of Woodbridge and others. He knows about 20 other companies trying to get energy from the sea.
Alternative energy is in the forefront again as high fuel costs after Hurricane Katrina wreaked havoc on the nation's oil refineries and Americans' wallets.
Federal officials estimate that all types of fuel will cost Americans one-third more this winter if temperatures are average.
But Woodbridge, a bookish 45-year-old with wire glasses whose old Hobie surfboard hangs in the den above his computer, is chasing an elusive prize that his father, David, now 84 and retired, never caught.
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The elder Woodbridge founded Aqua-Magnetics Inc., a small company that Tom now runs.
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But after tinkering with the idea off and on for years, Tom Woodbridge is making a final push toward making his father's dream a reality.
He has six U.S. and international patents, a $30,000 grant from the State's Technological Research and Development Authority and prototypes that take up most of the family garage in Satellite Beach.
Woodbridge has added $10,000 of his own money to the project.
His father's idea, to use the rocking motion of the waves to generate electricity, came from looking at his son's Slinky toy back in 1972. After noticing how easily it transferred energy, he thought, "why not use something like the Slinky as a coil that rocks?"
...
Tom Woodbridge has a system that follows his father's principle of capitalizing on the rocking.
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Woodbridge says he needs about $550,000 for 18 months of development for three ocean-trial models, and he expects it will cost $4.2 million to complete through production. Woodbridge said he has had a lot of inquiries but not a lot of investors.
"No one wants to give just a couple hundred thousand," he said.
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Woodbridge has heard naysayers for years, but his wife, Amelia, and two daughters believe in him. And he's determined to make it work.
"Maybe I'll get rich and famous; maybe I won't," he said. "But I want to get into the history book of energy as the man who made this work."
And his father's name will be there next to his, he promises.
Tidepool Archives
www.tidepool.org, 14 Dec 2005 [cached]
"I believe it'll change the world," said second-generation inventor Tom Woodbridge, a NASA engineer.The renewed interest in finding cheap, plentiful and renewable energy has rekindled interest in the work of Woodbridge and others.He knows about 20 other companies trying to get energy from the sea. (12/09/05) From the Contra Costa Times
"I believe it'll change the world," ...
tidepool.org, 10 Dec 2005 [cached]
"I believe it'll change the world," said second-generation inventor Tom Woodbridge, a NASA engineer.The renewed interest in finding cheap, plentiful and renewable energy has rekindled interest in the work of Woodbridge and others.He knows about 20 other companies trying to get energy from the sea. (09-Dec-05) Contra Costa Times
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