No Photo Available

Last Update

2015-03-28T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Tom Hanafan?

Honourable Tom Hanafan

Mayor, Mayor

Heartland 2050

HQ Phone: (402) 444-6866

Get ZoomInfo Grow

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Heartland 2050

2222 Cuming Street

Omaha, Nebraska 68102

United States

Background Information

Employment History

Vice President

City of Council Bluffs

Mayor

Habitat

Data Center Manager

Google Inc

President

Lancer

Mayor

Omaha Press Club

Affiliations

Executive Board Member
Iowa League of Cities

Board Member
Keep Iowa Beautiful

Board of Director and Leadership Roles
United Way of the Midlands

Board Member
Children's Square U.S.A

Board of Trustees Member
Iowa Public Agency Investment Trust

Founder
The Missouri River Pedestrian Bridge Naming Committee

Education

Thomas Jefferson High School

Thomas Jefferson High School , Council Bluffs

bachelor's degree

History and Government

University of South Dakota

Web References (55 Total References)


After more than 25 years in ...

www.omaha.com [cached]

After more than 25 years in office, Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan has plenty of mementos. On Friday, Hanafan said he's already taken 21 boxes of items out of his office with many more to go. article photo Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan got thrown into the deep end as mayor when a tornado flattened parts of the city just a year after he was elected. Here he tours the affected area near 25th Street and Avenue G with then-Gov. Terry Branstad. With more than 25 years in office, tens of thousands of Council Bluffs residents have never had another mayor. article photo Hanafan in 1981, before he started his first term on the City Council. article photo MARK DAVIS/THE WORLD-HERALD Tom Hanafan treasures a photo of himself with former U.S. Sen.

...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way
...
Tom Hanafan has straddled the Missouri River like no one else - one foot planted firmly in his hometown but the other frequently stepping across to Omaha.
As mayor of Council Bluffs for more than a quarter-century, the good-natured Hanafan has served opposite nine Omaha mayors and jokes that he is tired of breaking them in.
As he steps down as chief executive of his Iowa city of 62,000, he is being praised for his regional outlook. But even more so, people on both sides of the Muddy Mo marvel how much the Bluffs has changed under his long leadership.
...
If the Bluffs has undergone transformation - with casinos, hotels, sports and entertainment centers, massive public art, a new public library, high-tech investment, completion of a 15-year sewer-separation project and more - Hanafan, who grew up in a blue-collar railroad family, has served as the conductor and head transformer.
Self-described as "kind of a wild kid in high school," Hanafan, 66, is on his victory lap, his last month as mayor before retiring on Jan. 3. Despite being a short-timer, though, he isn't coasting.
He attended a statewide meeting in Des Moines on Wednesday about 2014 Iowa legislative priorities, and a luncheon on Thursday for city employees in the Bluffs.
Then he called across to Omaha to say he would be a bit late for a governmental board meeting.
...
Hanafan admires those who work with their hands as well as their heads and get things done. His own family included a dad and uncles who worked long careers with Union Pacific, and they got him a job there as a teenager.
A graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School, Tom played football at the University of South Dakota and majored in history and government.
He soon began officiating high school football, which he did for 40 years, and basketball for a number of years, too. As a volunteer, Hanafan helped build a YMCA youth program that he said started with 60 kids and grew to more than 700.
He won election to the City Council in 1982 in part, he says, because many of those youths from the Y distributed "Vote for Tom" fliers around town.
Council Bluffs switched to a strong-mayor form of government like Omaha's, and Hanafan, a former confection and tobacco salesman, was elected in 1987. He was re-elected in 1989 and five times after that.
His successor, Mayor-elect Matt Walsh, said Hanafan could have been re-elected mayor as long as he wanted to stay.
"He's someone people can talk to," said Walsh, an 18-year veteran of the City Council. "He is not aloof. Tom is just familiar with the common man, and he never let that change him no matter how long he remained in office."
Said Hanafan: "It's been kind of an amazing opportunity for a guy who grew up in the west end to stay with the city this long."
Council Bluffs has charming features, such as the General Dodge House, Bayliss Park and the Union Pacific Museum in a former Carnegie library building, as well as expensive homes in the hills. But it has long been seen as a working-class town, especially among the modest homes on the west end where Hanafan grew up.
As a kid, Tom played near what he called Stink Creek, which he pronounces "Stink Crick.
...
Hanafan said casinos have succeeded in part because people in the metro area were used to gambling at Ak-Sar-Ben.
Since 1996, the three casinos have produced $75 million in gambling tax revenue for Council Bluffs. Hanafan said they also provide 2,300 jobs, with about three-fifths of them going to Nebraskans.
The mayor's relationship with Omaha mostly has been warm. After a 1988 tornado caused $43million in damage and injured 80 people, he noted that many of the volunteers who helped with the cleanup came from the west side of the river.
And after the Missouri flooded for 114 days in 2011 - when he and others worked 14-hour days and guarded against sand boils undermining the levees - he praised Omaha officials for organizing and continuously pumping water that saved Eppley Airfield.
"Eppley could have gone under," Hanafan told me recently at the Omaha Press Club.
...
Hanafan now serves as co-chairman of Heartland 2050, a long-term vision of the Metropolitan Area Planning Agency for eight counties in the Omaha-Council Bluffs area. He will continue in that role, and said "this amazing region has unlimited opportunities for growth."
The MAPA board, on which he has served for years, honored him Thursday in Omaha. He was hailed not only for his success as mayor and for his contributions to the region but also for his "magnetism and good cheer."
Shaking his hand, a mayor from the Nebraska side of the river, Doug Kindig of La Vista, said simply: "Tom, you have been what a politician is supposed to be."
...
In the late 1990s, Hanafan was wooed by national Democrats to run for Congress, and he even attended a meeting at the White House. But he said he'd rather be close to constituents at home, where he can chat with them and hear their questions while he pumps gas for his car.
Not everything has gone perfectly. The Mid-America Center, a $74 million convention center and arena that opened in 2002, has lost money, though Hanafan said he doesn't consider building it a mistake.
...
"Tom has done a great job of utilizing his staff and the expertise of the community to build a vision."
The chamber CEO added that Hanafan is very good at building consensus.
...
As for Hanafan's metrowide, both-sides-of-the-river outlook, Mundt said: "Tom realizes there is so much more that we have in common than is different.
...
Hanafan and his wife of 43 years, Shirley, were honored this fall by Iowa Western Community College.
...
In his office, Mayor Hanafan displays a favorite photo.
...
Tom Hanafan is a member of the Omaha softball hall of fame as well as a former president of the Iowa League of Cities. His home and office phone numbers begin with the 712 area code of western Iowa, but his cellphone uses the 402 of eastern Nebraska.
He maintains first loyalty to his hometown. But he knows that a mere hyphen separates Omaha-Council Bluffs - and that we live in one metropolitan area.
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way As he steps down as mayor of his Iowa city of 62,000, Hanafan is being praised for his regional outlook. But even more so, people on both sides of the Muddy Mo marvel over how much the Bluffs has changed under his long leadership.


Kelly: A quarter-century of change in ...

www.gretnabreeze.com [cached]

Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way

...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way
...
After more than 25 years in office, Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan has plenty of mementos. On Friday, Hanafan said he's already taken 21 boxes of items out of his office with many more to go. article photo Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan got thrown into the deep end as mayor when a tornado flattened parts of the city just a year after he was elected. Here he tours the affected area near 25th Street and Avenue G with then-Gov.
...
Hanafan in 1981, before he started his first term on the City Council. article photo MARK DAVIS/THE WORLD-HERALD Tom Hanafan treasures a photo of himself with former U.S. Sen.
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way
...
Tom Hanafan has straddled the Missouri River like no one else - one foot planted firmly in his hometown but the other frequently stepping across to Omaha.
As mayor of Council Bluffs for more than a quarter-century, the good-natured Hanafan has served opposite nine Omaha mayors and jokes that he is tired of breaking them in.
As he steps down as chief executive of his Iowa city of 62,000, he is being praised for his regional outlook. But even more so, people on both sides of the Muddy Mo marvel how much the Bluffs has changed under his long leadership.
...
If the Bluffs has undergone transformation - with casinos, hotels, sports and entertainment centers, massive public art, a new public library, high-tech investment, completion of a 15-year sewer-separation project and more - Hanafan, who grew up in a blue-collar railroad family, has served as the conductor and head transformer.
Self-described as "kind of a wild kid in high school," Hanafan, 66, is on his victory lap, his last month as mayor before retiring on Jan. 3. Despite being a short-timer, though, he isn't coasting.
He attended a statewide meeting in Des Moines on Wednesday about 2014 Iowa legislative priorities, and a luncheon on Thursday for city employees in the Bluffs.
Then he called across to Omaha to say he would be a bit late for a governmental board meeting.
...
Hanafan admires those who work with their hands as well as their heads and get things done. His own family included a dad and uncles who worked long careers with Union Pacific, and they got him a job there as a teenager.
A graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School, Tom played football at the University of South Dakota and majored in history and government.
He soon began officiating high school football, which he did for 40 years, and basketball for a number of years, too. As a volunteer, Hanafan helped build a YMCA youth program that he said started with 60 kids and grew to more than 700.
He won election to the City Council in 1982 in part, he says, because many of those youths from the Y distributed "Vote for Tom" fliers around town.
Council Bluffs switched to a strong-mayor form of government like Omaha's, and Hanafan, a former confection and tobacco salesman, was elected in 1987. He was re-elected in 1989 and five times after that.
His successor, Mayor-elect Matt Walsh, said Hanafan could have been re-elected mayor as long as he wanted to stay.
"He's someone people can talk to," said Walsh, an 18-year veteran of the City Council. "He is not aloof. Tom is just familiar with the common man, and he never let that change him no matter how long he remained in office."
Said Hanafan: "It's been kind of an amazing opportunity for a guy who grew up in the west end to stay with the city this long."
Council Bluffs has charming features, such as the General Dodge House, Bayliss Park and the Union Pacific Museum in a former Carnegie library building, as well as expensive homes in the hills. But it has long been seen as a working-class town, especially among the modest homes on the west end where Hanafan grew up.
As a kid, Tom played near what he called Stink Creek, which he pronounces "Stink Crick.
...
Hanafan said casinos have succeeded in part because people in the metro area were used to gambling at Ak-Sar-Ben.
Since 1996, the three casinos have produced $75 million in gambling tax revenue for Council Bluffs. Hanafan said they also provide 2,300 jobs, with about three-fifths of them going to Nebraskans.
The mayor's relationship with Omaha mostly has been warm. After a 1988 tornado caused $43million in damage and injured 80 people, he noted that many of the volunteers who helped with the cleanup came from the west side of the river.
And after the Missouri flooded for 114 days in 2011 - when he and others worked 14-hour days and guarded against sand boils undermining the levees - he praised Omaha officials for organizing and continuously pumping water that saved Eppley Airfield.
"Eppley could have gone under," Hanafan told me recently at the Omaha Press Club.
...
Hanafan now serves as co-chairman of Heartland 2050, a long-term vision of the Metropolitan Area Planning Agency for eight counties in the Omaha-Council Bluffs area. He will continue in that role, and said "this amazing region has unlimited opportunities for growth."
The MAPA board, on which he has served for years, honored him Thursday in Omaha. He was hailed not only for his success as mayor and for his contributions to the region but also for his "magnetism and good cheer."
Shaking his hand, a mayor from the Nebraska side of the river, Doug Kindig of La Vista, said simply: "Tom, you have been what a politician is supposed to be."
...
In the late 1990s, Hanafan was wooed by national Democrats to run for Congress, and he even attended a meeting at the White House. But he said he'd rather be close to constituents at home, where he can chat with them and hear their questions while he pumps gas for his car.
Not everything has gone perfectly. The Mid-America Center, a $74 million convention center and arena that opened in 2002, has lost money, though Hanafan said he doesn't consider building it a mistake.
...
"Tom has done a great job of utilizing his staff and the expertise of the community to build a vision."
The chamber CEO added that Hanafan is very good at building consensus.
...
As for Hanafan's metrowide, both-sides-of-the-river outlook, Mundt said: "Tom realizes there is so much more that we have in common than is different.
...
Hanafan and his wife of 43 years, Shirley, were honored this fall by Iowa Western Community College.
...
In his office, Mayor Hanafan displays a favorite photo.
...
Tom Hanafan is a member of the Omaha softball hall of fame as well as a former president of the Iowa League of Cities. His home and office phone numbers begin with the 712 area code of western Iowa, but his cellphone uses the 402 of eastern Nebraska.
He maintains first loyalty to his hometown. But he knows that a mere hyphen separates Omaha-Council Bluffs - and that we live in one metropolitan area.
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way - 12:44 am
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way This Omahan takes vacation to decorate his home for the holidays
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way As he steps down as mayor of his Iowa city of 62,000, Hanafan is being praised for his regional outlook. But even more so, people on both sides of the Muddy Mo marvel over how much the Bluffs has changed under his long leadership.


Kelly: A quarter-century of change in ...

www.omaha.com [cached]

Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way This Omahan takes vacation to decorate his home for the holidays

...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way
...
After more than 25 years in office, Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan has plenty of mementos. On Friday, Hanafan said he's already taken 21 boxes of items out of his office with many more to go. article photo Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan got thrown into the deep end as mayor when a tornado flattened parts of the city just a year after he was elected. Here he tours the affected area near 25th Street and Avenue G with then-Gov.
...
Hanafan in 1981, before he started his first term on the City Council. article photo MARK DAVIS/THE WORLD-HERALD Tom Hanafan treasures a photo of himself with former U.S. Sen.
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way
...
Tom Hanafan has straddled the Missouri River like no one else - one foot planted firmly in his hometown but the other frequently stepping across to Omaha.
As mayor of Council Bluffs for more than a quarter-century, the good-natured Hanafan has served opposite nine Omaha mayors and jokes that he is tired of breaking them in.
As he steps down as chief executive of his Iowa city of 62,000, he is being praised for his regional outlook. But even more so, people on both sides of the Muddy Mo marvel how much the Bluffs has changed under his long leadership.
...
If the Bluffs has undergone transformation - with casinos, hotels, sports and entertainment centers, massive public art, a new public library, high-tech investment, completion of a 15-year sewer-separation project and more - Hanafan, who grew up in a blue-collar railroad family, has served as the conductor and head transformer.
Self-described as "kind of a wild kid in high school," Hanafan, 66, is on his victory lap, his last month as mayor before retiring on Jan. 3. Despite being a short-timer, though, he isn't coasting.
He attended a statewide meeting in Des Moines on Wednesday about 2014 Iowa legislative priorities, and a luncheon on Thursday for city employees in the Bluffs.
Then he called across to Omaha to say he would be a bit late for a governmental board meeting.
...
Hanafan admires those who work with their hands as well as their heads and get things done. His own family included a dad and uncles who worked long careers with Union Pacific, and they got him a job there as a teenager.
A graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School, Tom played football at the University of South Dakota and majored in history and government.
He soon began officiating high school football, which he did for 40 years, and basketball for a number of years, too. As a volunteer, Hanafan helped build a YMCA youth program that he said started with 60 kids and grew to more than 700.
He won election to the City Council in 1982 in part, he says, because many of those youths from the Y distributed "Vote for Tom" fliers around town.
Council Bluffs switched to a strong-mayor form of government like Omaha's, and Hanafan, a former confection and tobacco salesman, was elected in 1987. He was re-elected in 1989 and five times after that.
His successor, Mayor-elect Matt Walsh, said Hanafan could have been re-elected mayor as long as he wanted to stay.
"He's someone people can talk to," said Walsh, an 18-year veteran of the City Council. "He is not aloof. Tom is just familiar with the common man, and he never let that change him no matter how long he remained in office."
Said Hanafan: "It's been kind of an amazing opportunity for a guy who grew up in the west end to stay with the city this long."
Council Bluffs has charming features, such as the General Dodge House, Bayliss Park and the Union Pacific Museum in a former Carnegie library building, as well as expensive homes in the hills. But it has long been seen as a working-class town, especially among the modest homes on the west end where Hanafan grew up.
As a kid, Tom played near what he called Stink Creek, which he pronounces "Stink Crick.
...
Hanafan said casinos have succeeded in part because people in the metro area were used to gambling at Ak-Sar-Ben.
Since 1996, the three casinos have produced $75 million in gambling tax revenue for Council Bluffs. Hanafan said they also provide 2,300 jobs, with about three-fifths of them going to Nebraskans.
The mayor's relationship with Omaha mostly has been warm. After a 1988 tornado caused $43million in damage and injured 80 people, he noted that many of the volunteers who helped with the cleanup came from the west side of the river.
And after the Missouri flooded for 114 days in 2011 - when he and others worked 14-hour days and guarded against sand boils undermining the levees - he praised Omaha officials for organizing and continuously pumping water that saved Eppley Airfield.
"Eppley could have gone under," Hanafan told me recently at the Omaha Press Club.
...
Hanafan now serves as co-chairman of Heartland 2050, a long-term vision of the Metropolitan Area Planning Agency for eight counties in the Omaha-Council Bluffs area. He will continue in that role, and said "this amazing region has unlimited opportunities for growth."
The MAPA board, on which he has served for years, honored him Thursday in Omaha. He was hailed not only for his success as mayor and for his contributions to the region but also for his "magnetism and good cheer."
Shaking his hand, a mayor from the Nebraska side of the river, Doug Kindig of La Vista, said simply: "Tom, you have been what a politician is supposed to be."
...
In the late 1990s, Hanafan was wooed by national Democrats to run for Congress, and he even attended a meeting at the White House. But he said he'd rather be close to constituents at home, where he can chat with them and hear their questions while he pumps gas for his car.
Not everything has gone perfectly. The Mid-America Center, a $74 million convention center and arena that opened in 2002, has lost money, though Hanafan said he doesn't consider building it a mistake.
...
"Tom has done a great job of utilizing his staff and the expertise of the community to build a vision."
The chamber CEO added that Hanafan is very good at building consensus.
...
As for Hanafan's metrowide, both-sides-of-the-river outlook, Mundt said: "Tom realizes there is so much more that we have in common than is different.
...
Hanafan and his wife of 43 years, Shirley, were honored this fall by Iowa Western Community College.
...
In his office, Mayor Hanafan displays a favorite photo.
...
Tom Hanafan is a member of the Omaha softball hall of fame as well as a former president of the Iowa League of Cities. His home and office phone numbers begin with the 712 area code of western Iowa, but his cellphone uses the 402 of eastern Nebraska.
He maintains first loyalty to his hometown. But he knows that a mere hyphen separates Omaha-Council Bluffs - and that we live in one metropolitan area.
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way - 12:44 am
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way This Omahan takes vacation to decorate his home for the holidays
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way As he steps down as mayor of his Iowa city of 62,000, Hanafan is being praised for his regional outlook. But even more so, people on both sides of the Muddy Mo marvel over how much the Bluffs has changed under his long leadership.


Kelly: A quarter-century of change in ...

www.ralstonrecorder.com [cached]

Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way Pining for a Christmas tree? You'd better hurry This Omahan takes vacation to decorate his home for the holidays

...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way
...
After more than 25 years in office, Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan has plenty of mementos. On Friday, Hanafan said he's already taken 21 boxes of items out of his office with many more to go. article photo Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan got thrown into the deep end as mayor when a tornado flattened parts of the city just a year after he was elected. Here he tours the affected area near 25th Street and Avenue G with then-Gov.
...
Hanafan in 1981, before he started his first term on the City Council. article photo MARK DAVIS/THE WORLD-HERALD Tom Hanafan treasures a photo of himself with former U.S. Sen.
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way
...
Tom Hanafan has straddled the Missouri River like no one else - one foot planted firmly in his hometown but the other frequently stepping across to Omaha.
As mayor of Council Bluffs for more than a quarter-century, the good-natured Hanafan has served opposite nine Omaha mayors and jokes that he is tired of breaking them in.
As he steps down as chief executive of his Iowa city of 62,000, he is being praised for his regional outlook. But even more so, people on both sides of the Muddy Mo marvel how much the Bluffs has changed under his long leadership.
...
If the Bluffs has undergone transformation - with casinos, hotels, sports and entertainment centers, massive public art, a new public library, high-tech investment, completion of a 15-year sewer-separation project and more - Hanafan, who grew up in a blue-collar railroad family, has served as the conductor and head transformer.
Self-described as "kind of a wild kid in high school," Hanafan, 66, is on his victory lap, his last month as mayor before retiring on Jan. 3. Despite being a short-timer, though, he isn't coasting.
He attended a statewide meeting in Des Moines on Wednesday about 2014 Iowa legislative priorities, and a luncheon on Thursday for city employees in the Bluffs.
Then he called across to Omaha to say he would be a bit late for a governmental board meeting.
...
Hanafan admires those who work with their hands as well as their heads and get things done. His own family included a dad and uncles who worked long careers with Union Pacific, and they got him a job there as a teenager.
A graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School, Tom played football at the University of South Dakota and majored in history and government.
He soon began officiating high school football, which he did for 40 years, and basketball for a number of years, too. As a volunteer, Hanafan helped build a YMCA youth program that he said started with 60 kids and grew to more than 700.
He won election to the City Council in 1982 in part, he says, because many of those youths from the Y distributed "Vote for Tom" fliers around town.
Council Bluffs switched to a strong-mayor form of government like Omaha's, and Hanafan, a former confection and tobacco salesman, was elected in 1987. He was re-elected in 1989 and five times after that.
His successor, Mayor-elect Matt Walsh, said Hanafan could have been re-elected mayor as long as he wanted to stay.
"He's someone people can talk to," said Walsh, an 18-year veteran of the City Council. "He is not aloof. Tom is just familiar with the common man, and he never let that change him no matter how long he remained in office."
Said Hanafan: "It's been kind of an amazing opportunity for a guy who grew up in the west end to stay with the city this long."
Council Bluffs has charming features, such as the General Dodge House, Bayliss Park and the Union Pacific Museum in a former Carnegie library building, as well as expensive homes in the hills. But it has long been seen as a working-class town, especially among the modest homes on the west end where Hanafan grew up.
As a kid, Tom played near what he called Stink Creek, which he pronounces "Stink Crick.
...
Hanafan said casinos have succeeded in part because people in the metro area were used to gambling at Ak-Sar-Ben.
Since 1996, the three casinos have produced $75 million in gambling tax revenue for Council Bluffs. Hanafan said they also provide 2,300 jobs, with about three-fifths of them going to Nebraskans.
The mayor's relationship with Omaha mostly has been warm. After a 1988 tornado caused $43million in damage and injured 80 people, he noted that many of the volunteers who helped with the cleanup came from the west side of the river.
And after the Missouri flooded for 114 days in 2011 - when he and others worked 14-hour days and guarded against sand boils undermining the levees - he praised Omaha officials for organizing and continuously pumping water that saved Eppley Airfield.
"Eppley could have gone under," Hanafan told me recently at the Omaha Press Club.
...
Hanafan now serves as co-chairman of Heartland 2050, a long-term vision of the Metropolitan Area Planning Agency for eight counties in the Omaha-Council Bluffs area. He will continue in that role, and said "this amazing region has unlimited opportunities for growth."
The MAPA board, on which he has served for years, honored him Thursday in Omaha. He was hailed not only for his success as mayor and for his contributions to the region but also for his "magnetism and good cheer."
Shaking his hand, a mayor from the Nebraska side of the river, Doug Kindig of La Vista, said simply: "Tom, you have been what a politician is supposed to be."
...
In the late 1990s, Hanafan was wooed by national Democrats to run for Congress, and he even attended a meeting at the White House. But he said he'd rather be close to constituents at home, where he can chat with them and hear their questions while he pumps gas for his car.
Not everything has gone perfectly. The Mid-America Center, a $74 million convention center and arena that opened in 2002, has lost money, though Hanafan said he doesn't consider building it a mistake.
...
"Tom has done a great job of utilizing his staff and the expertise of the community to build a vision."
The chamber CEO added that Hanafan is very good at building consensus.
...
As for Hanafan's metrowide, both-sides-of-the-river outlook, Mundt said: "Tom realizes there is so much more that we have in common than is different.
...
Hanafan and his wife of 43 years, Shirley, were honored this fall by Iowa Western Community College.
...
In his office, Mayor Hanafan displays a favorite photo.
...
Tom Hanafan is a member of the Omaha softball hall of fame as well as a former president of the Iowa League of Cities. His home and office phone numbers begin with the 712 area code of western Iowa, but his cellphone uses the 402 of eastern Nebraska.
He maintains first loyalty to his hometown. But he knows that a mere hyphen separates Omaha-Council Bluffs - and that we live in one metropolitan area.
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way - 12:44 am
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way Pining for a Christmas tree? You'd better hurry
...
Kelly: A quarter-century of change in Council Bluffs, with Tom Hanafan leading the way As he steps down as mayor of his Iowa city of 62,000, Hanafan is being praised for his regional outlook. But even more so, people on both sides of the Muddy Mo marvel over how much the Bluffs has changed under his long leadership.


KIOS News, 07/18/2013 Read ...

heartland2050.org [cached]

KIOS News, 07/18/2013 Read about what Council Bluffs Mayor Tom Hanafan, co-chair of the Heartland 2050, has to say about [...]

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name

Other people with the name Hanafan

Kathy Hanafan
Council Bluffs Community School District

Kathleen Hanafan
HM Energy LLC

Mike Hanafan
Time Warner Cable Inc

Tom Hanafan
Noon Rotary Club

Brenda Hanafan
Council Bluffs Community School District

City Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

People Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Company Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory