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This profile was last updated on 6/23/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Senior Business Consultant

ARAMARK Healthcare
Phone: (215) ***-****  HQ Phone
Email: s***@***.com
ARAMARK Corporation
1101 Market St.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107
United States

Company Description: ARAMARK Corporation (ARAMARK) is a provider of a range of managed services to business, educational, healthcare and governmental institutions and sports,...   more
Background

Employment History

Education

  • Parkersburg High School
10 Total References
Web References
BEIJING- Todd Seligman can ...
www.newsandsentinel.com, 18 Aug 2008 [cached]
BEIJING- Todd Seligman can attest to the voracious appetites of Olympic athletes.
...
Seligman, a 1975 graduate of Parkersburg High School, is director of culinary production systems for ARAMARK, which won the contract to cater the Olympics for the athletes and media corps.
Seligman and staff are responsible for providing food in five areas: athletes village, main press center, international broadcast center and two media villages.This involves about 45,000 meals in the village and 25,000 meals in the press centers - a job of Olympic proportions.
In an e-mail from Beijing, Seligman said, "In general they (athletes in the Olympics) are very big eaters.
...
Seligman declined to discuss specifics of the eating habits of individual athletes, saying ARAMARK prides itself in providing a relaxing, safe, hassle-free environment for the Olympians to dine in.
"As far as the athletes are concerned, we are enjoying the highest participation of athletes dining with us that I can remember.So you end up seeing everyone at one time or another," he said.
Seligman, a certified executive chef, and ARAMARK also worked the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece, which was a smaller food-service operation, he said.
The athletes dining area has themed stations, such as Mediterranean, international, Asian, cold foods, beverages and ice cream/yogurt.Staff prepare grilled meats to order, pizza, carved meats in rotisserie oven stations and the world-famous Peking Duck is carved to order at a station.The duck is served with leeks and Hoisin Sauce wrapped in tiny pancakes, Seligman said.
About 5,000 people can be fed in the main dining room, so it gets turned about eight times a day, he said.
The chefs, cooks and staff have been doing an outstanding job in Beijing, Seligman said.Ninety percent of the dishes are being made from scratch, which adds work to everyone from the warehouse workers to the cooks to the staff responsible for keeping the pots and pans clean, he said.
"Our Chinese staff, which is comprised mostly of students from various culinary programs from around China, have been wonderful.I can speak personally for my staff (which is comprised of nine international managers and 45 students) that they are great.I am blessed to have the high quality individuals working to support what I am responsible for.I really could not do what needs to be done without them," Seligman, who currently lives in DuBois, Pa., said.
He said the Chinese have been diligent in providing an adequate supply of safe, nutritious food for the athletes and press corps.
During personal eating forays into the city of 17 million people, Seligman and family have fallen in love with many dishes, he said.
"We try to figure out which of our favorites will end up back in the States as a new trendy item.Three of our favorites that we can see making it in the bar scene would be Haystack Potatoes (julienne potatoes deep fried, tossed with dried whole chili peppers and mounded up like a stack of hay in a field), Chicken Wings on a skewer seasoned with cumin and other spices and grilled over charcoal, and peanuts roasted with small dried chili peppers.
"Other items in the entree category would be Squirrel Fish, a whole boneless fish that is deep fried and finished in a sweet and sour sauce.Dumplings that have a soup broth in them (aptly named soup dumplings) are to die for.And finally there is a minced grilled lamb with grilled Naan (a Middle Eastern flat bread), peppers and onions that is spiced heavily with Middle Eastern spices and you can't stop eating," Seligman wrote in his e-mail.
His favorite restaurant in Beijing is the Mushroom Hot Pot, which specializes in hundreds of types of mushrooms.Each has a specific health benefit.
"You pick out the selection of mushrooms and they are cooked at your table in pots of homemade chicken stock.The stock's flavor increases as you cook each type of mushroom.The staff explains the benefits of the mushroom as they add them," Seligman said.
...
Todd Seligman said he loves the traditions in China.He will be there through mid-October.
DuBOIS - Todd Seligman of ...
www.thecourierexpress.com, 1 Dec 2007 [cached]
DuBOIS - Todd Seligman of Treasure Lake is heading to the Olympics in Beijing, China, this summer.His event?Food management.Seligman is an information technology manager for production systems/integration for ARAMARK Healthcare.He said this is the 14th year ARAMARK has been contracted to handle food management at the Olympics.This is Seligman's second Olympics; his first was Athens four years ago.He said his responsibilities haven't changed much from Athens and that his background as a chef helps him out a lot."I manage the menus, recipes and ingredients," he said."I manage it logistically.I figure out how much to buy and how much to produce with the help of computer software."Seligman said there are 800 to 1,000 recipes used throughout the Olympics and each one is tested beforehand."We are about three-quarters of the way through (the recipes) now," he said.Seligman said the host country's food is always highlighted, so at this Olympics, the focus is on Asian cuisine.Four other types of cuisine are also included.A staff of 2,000 people will prepare and serve food for approximately 24,000 athletes.Seligman said the cooks are broken up into teams and prepare the different types of cuisine.This time, the cooks will be doing more display cooking, he said."It's like a well oiled machine," Seligman said."It's highly intense.""Along with the Athlete's Village, we are also doing the media press center and broadcast," Seligman said."That adds 16 additional areas, which makes it a little more challenging."Seligman said he learned a lot from his first Olympics. "I'm a vet now," he said."We are much further along, in my mind, with this Olympics."He said, in Athens, in May, nothing was finished.In China, he said, the venues are already done and everything is "very well organized.""They are so far ahead of the game," he said.Seligman just returned from a trip to China."It is a 131/2 hour trip there; that gets your attention," he said."And the time zones, it is almost exactly opposite of us, so you are pretty much going all the time.""It is a wonderful country," he said "You feel safe there walking around.Everyone is so gracious and friendly.""It is hard to get around though, it is a big city," he said."You have to take a taxi."Seligman said the city is so big, the taxi drivers don't always know the place you want to go.He said they rely on bridges to get you places."If you say it's near this bridge, they can usually direct you somewhere," he said.Seligman said the language is difficult to master."You have to say something exactly right, with the right inflection, or you end up somewhere you didn't mean to go," he said."Some things do get lost in the translation.You rely on cards a lot."Seligman said China is a beautiful country that is "struggling with the old.""There is lots of building going on," he said.
...
Seligman will return to China for a short trip in December and will leave for good in February."I will come back in November," he said."We will start serving meals at the press centers in March," he said.The Opening Ceremony for the Olympics starts at 8 p.m. Aug. 8.Seligman said his wife Stacy and children Emily, 18, Patrick, 16, and Victoria, 13, are supportive of this project, as they were the Athens Olympics."They are all hoping they get to come for a visit," he said, adding the whole family came over to Athens."They loved Greece and learned a lot," he said."We'll have to see if I can get them over to China, I'd love to do that.""You learn so much when you get to see another culture," he said.
NewsandSentinel.com: Parkersburg natives reflect on Olympic experiences - - The Parkersburg News & Sentinel
www.newsandsentinel.com, 29 Aug 2004 [cached]
ATHENS, Greece - Parkersburg natives Amy Deem and Todd Seligman have viewed the Summer Olympics from different perspectives.
...
Seligman, a certified executive chef, is employed by Aramark, the vendor hired to provide food to 35,000 athletes, coaches and volunteers during the Olympics.
...
Todd Seligman, a 1975 graduate of Parkersburg High School, won't be leaving Athens for his home in Pennsylvania until Oct. 5.Aramark, where he works on the logistics of providing food and detailing costs for large events, will continue on as food vendor for the paralympics (handicapped athletes) in Greece.
"This has been a good experience and quite an opportunity for me," Seligman said.During his three-month stay in Greece, Seligman has lived in three areas: the upscale Kolonaki, in central Athens and now in Rafina on the Aegean Sea, a 45-minute drive from the Olympic Village.From the balcony of his room in the multi-level hotel, Seligman has a great view of the trees, vegetation, sea and city.
He travels by chartered bus in a reserved lane of a three-lane highway from Rafina to the Olympic Village.For security reasons, the bus driver varies his route each day.
Seligman watched in awe a month ago as the Greeks celebrated their first championship in the European Cup soccer competition.He said 80,000 people celebrated in the streets where he was living, while fireworks were set off and cars overturned.
Seligman's work schedule is finally starting to ease a bit.He had worked 60 consecutive days without a day off before and during the Olympics."I now work 12 hours a day and take one day off a week," he said.
Seligman handles projections on how much food is needed to feed the athletes around-the-clock, carefully keeping waste to a minimum.He sends detailed information to company accountants on the costs involved in feeding the masses.
Seligman admitted that the kitchen staff has struggled at times to keep pace with the athletes' demand for fruit and Greek salads."We have gone through tons of melons and berries," he said.
He got a chance to prepare a few meals at the Asian station during the opening ceremony. (Once a chef, always a chef.)
He and others must pass through metal detectors and are searched for 15 minutes before entering the Olympic Village.He has seen many soldiers carrying rifles around the city, and police cars escort the team buses.
Seligman said he would respect the privacy of the Olympians by not publicly stating who he has seen or met in the dining areas.
Seligman has found it fascinating how well the 100 chefs from around the world and the temporary Greek help have meshed to get the job done."It isn't a chaotic frenzy around the kitchen and serving areas.It has run very smoothly," said Seligman, who has worked major events in the food vendor business in the United States.
He is looking forward to his wife and children arriving in Athens next week.Sister Nanette Seligman, a teacher at Parkersburg High School, also has planned a visit in September.
Seligman has been impressed by the sense of community in Greek towns and cities.Restaurants serving "simple food" family-style are the norm.Farmers walk into restaurants carrying fresh produce from the nearby fields.
Good times in Greek villages usually occur from 10 p.m. to midnight, Seligman said.The town squares fill with adults and children and the party begins.
Seligman said the Greeks have been friendly and gracious toward him during his stay."There has been no hatred toward Americans, that I've seen.We shouldn't flaunt our American ways while over there."
A big difference between life in America and Greece is that most Greeks speak several foreign languages, including English, Seligman said.
DuBOIS - Todd Seligman of ...
explorecolumbusohio.com, 2 Dec 2007 [cached]
DuBOIS - Todd Seligman of Treasure Lake is heading to the Olympics in Beijing, China, this summer.His event?Food management.Seligman is an information technology manager for production systems/integration for ARAMARK Healthcare.
Asian Food Center Information
www.gourmet-cooking-recipe-nutrition.com, 6 Jan 2007 [cached]
DuBOIS - Todd Seligman of Treasure Lake is heading to the Olympics in Beijing, China, this summer.His event?Food management.Seligman is an information technology manager for production systems/integration for ARAMARK Healthcare.
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