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This profile was last updated on 5/1/06  and contains information from public web pages.
 
Background

Employment History

  • Professor
    UF
  • Management Professor
    UF
  • UF Management Professor
25 Total References
Web References
HCA
www.hcamag.com, 1 May 2006 [cached]
Unfortunately, many human resource departments adopt policing and practices designed to squelch bad behaviour rather than look for its root causes, said Timothy Judge, a UF management professor."They may control one form of behaviour, but the problem is that employees become deviant in other behaviours that are less observable and less easy to control," he added.
Getting Ahead - Building Your Business and Advancing Your Career
www.business-journal.com, 19 Dec 2005 [cached]
Conceited, vain and self-absorbed employees tend to have an inflated opinion about their job skills but actually are sub-par performers in the view of their supervisors and colleagues, according to Timothy Judge, a UF management professor.
"It's one thing to think you're better than other people when in fact you're no better; quite another to think you're better when you're actually worse," he said."Not recognizing your own limitations in the workplace is going to keep you from trying to develop skills that would help you improve and make your organization more effective."
Although clinical studies show that people who excessively admire themselves have difficulty forming close intimate relationships, little research has been done on the effects of narcissism in the workplace, Judge said.
Judge, along with UF management professor Jeffery LePine and graduate student Bruce Rich, examined how people who scored high on a psychological measure for narcissism rated their leadership and job skills compared with reviews by bosses and co-workers of how well they did.
...
But those they worked for and with reported they did an inferior job compared with other employees, Judge said.
"We expect people to be self-confident to succeed in business -- even to the point of idolizing the Donald Trumps of the world -- because we see some real limitations in the shrinking-violet type," he noted."The paradox is most of us would agree that being arrogant and overly obsessed with yourself are not positive qualities."
Because narcissists lack empathy and have self-serving motives, they are less likely to contribute positively to the office social climate by helping others, being a good sport and going above and beyond the call of duty for the greater good, he said.
Studies suggest that narcissists unnecessarily perceive threats, which could result in aggressive behavior at work if their self-concept is challenged, Judge said.For instance, if a co-worker gets a better performance rating or a higher raise, the narcissist may try to undermine that person with derogatory remarks or by reacting in some other angry way, he said.
Tallahassee Democrat | 08/06/2004 | Brains are OK, but charisma is what counts
www.tallahassee.com, 6 Aug 2004 [cached]
Although some studies have found intelligence to be one of the best predictors - if not the single best predictor - of job performance, braininess is a much less accurate measure of someone's leadership skills, said Timothy Judge, a UF management professor.
"Being intelligent does help a leader, but clearly in and of itself is not enough," said Judge, who analyzed 151 studies published since World War II.
He found intelligence has only a modest effect on leadership effectiveness.
...
What's important in a democracy is the ability to present a compelling vision for the future because politicians must rally public opinion to build support for their programs, Judge said.Leaders who lack that ability will fail.
"If we think of the great presidents in U.S. history - Lincoln, Washington, Roosevelt and perhaps Reagan - they all were relatively charismatic, visionary sort of leaders, which seems to be the most important characteristic of presidential leadership," he said.
UF study: Even good employees act up if supervisors mistreat them
www.hr-topics.com, 6 April 2006 [cached]
Gossiping, pilfering, backstabbing and long lunch breaks become the norm not just for workplace malcontents but even for exemplary employees who feel put down by their supervisors, said Timothy Judge, a UF management professor who led the research.
...
Judge said he and a consultant asked human resource professionals several years ago about the value of job satisfaction and were amazed to hear such comments as "it's a foreign term around here" and "the subject is never brought up."
Many companies assume employees are motivated only by opportunities to earn more money or by the threat of losing their jobs, not realizing that positive management-labor relations influence how long workers remain with an employer and the extent to which they engage in helping behaviors, he said.
"Training supervisors to treat employees with respect is not something that costs employers a lot of money, and it can produce real dividends," he said.
Judge, Michigan State University management professor Remus Ilies, and Brent Scott, a UF graduate assistant, looked at how people's moods influenced their work attitudes.
...
Some business leaders may claim they cannot pay attention to how workers are treated if they are to keep a sharp eye on company profitability, Judge said, but one interest doesn't have to come at the expense of the other. "You can be hard-nosed about business effectiveness and still be concerned with the attitudes of your employees," he said.
Sun Herald - 10/23/05
www.sun-herald.com, 23 Oct 2005 [cached]
Conceited, vain and self-absorbed employees tend to have an inflated opinion about their job skills but actually are subpar performers in the view of their supervisors and colleagues, said Timothy Judge, a UF management professor, whose research is scheduled to be published in the January issue of the Journal of Applied Psychology.
"It's one thing to think you're better than other people when in fact you're no better; quite another to think you're better when you're actually worse," Judge said."Not recognizing your own limitations in the workplace is going to keep you from trying to develop skills that would help you improve and make your organization more effective."
Although clinical studies show that people who excessively admire themselves have difficulty forming close intimate relationships, little research has been done on the effects of narcissism in the workplace, Judge said.
Judge, along with UF management professor Jeffery LePine and graduate student Bruce Rich, examined how people who scored high on a psychological measure for narcissism rated their leadership and job skills compared with reviews by bosses and co-workers of how well they did.
...
Although narcissists were no happier or unhappier than other people in their jobs, they considered themselves superior at doing them, Judge said.But those they worked for and with reported they did an inferior job compared with other employees, he said.
"We expect people to be self-confident to succeed in business -- even to the point of idolizing the Donald Trumps of the world -- because we see some real limitations in the shrinking-violet type," he said."The paradox is most of us would agree that being arrogant and overly obsessed with yourself are not positive qualities."
Because narcissists lack empathy and have self-serving motives, they are less likely to contribute positively to the office social climate by helping others, being a good sport and going above and beyond the call of duty for the greater good, he said.
Studies suggest that narcissists unnecessarily perceive threats, Judge said, which could result in aggressive behavior at work if their self-concept is challenged.For instance, if a co-worker gets a better performance rating or a higher raise, the narcissist may try to undermine that person with derogatory remarks or by reacting in some other angry way, he said.
In short, it appears that narcissists report themselves as better out of an honest belief, but also as a defensive strategy to maintain appearances, he said.
"Given the social undesirability of narcissism -- few would wish to be described as vain, self-absorbed, egotistical, selfish, conceited and grandiose -- organizations might be expected to screen out narcissists, at least implicitly, in hiring decisions," Judge said.
Some consulting firms offer special training programs in developing empathy for managers who may be technically competent but deficient in interpersonal skills, Judge said."It would be interesting to see if the people sent to these training programs in order to save their jobs and careers are disproportionately narcissistic," he said.
Whether one must atone for self-aggrandizing behavior may ultimately depend on an employee's place in the company hierarchy, Judge said."It may be easier to get away with being narcissistic if you're kind of the kingpin of the organization," he said.
Gender was not a factor in whether an employee was likely to be narcissistic.
"Some evidence suggests that women are more interested in building relationships and men are more interested in getting ahead," he said."I thought men would be more likely to be narcissistic and exploitive of other people because of their macho image, which may just be a stereotype."
Taken to an extreme, the lack of a realistic appraisal of oneself can have dangerous consequences, Judge said.
"A lot of tragedies in the world have been committed by people with grandiose views of their capabilities," he said.
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