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Wrong Thomas Stocker?

Thomas F. Stocker

Professor of Climate and Environmental Physics

University of Bern

HQ Phone:  +41 31 631 44 11

Direct Phone: +41 ** *** ** **direct phone

Email: s***@***.ch

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Bern

Hochschulstrasse 4

Bern, Bern,3012

Switzerland

Background Information

Employment History

Co-Chair

IPCC


Research Positions

University of Hawaii


Co-Chair of Working Group I

UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change


Affiliations

University College London

Research Positions


McGill University

Research Positions


Columbia University

Research Positions


American Geophysical Union

Fellow


Academia Europaea

Member


Academy of Science and Literature

Corresponding Member


Education

Department of Earth Sciences

University of Bristol


Ph.D. supervisor

University of Bern , Switzerland


PhD with distinction

ETH Zürich


Web References(196 Total References)


The science of climate change - Speakers' biographies | Royal Society

royalsociety.org [cached]

Professor Thomas Stocker (Speaker)
Stocker Thomas Stocker is Professor of Climate and Environmental Physics at the University of Bern and head of the Division of Climate and Environmental Physics (staff of 50) of the Physics Institute since 1993. He obtained his PhD with distinction from ETH Zürich in 1987. After reserach positions at the University College (London), and McGill University (Montreal), he was appointed Associate Research Scientist at the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (New York) from 1991-1993. Stocker's main research interest is the development of climate models and the investigation of past and future climate change combining models and paleoclimatic reconstructions using ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. He developed the first climate models of intermediate complexity and investigates the role of the carbon cycle in the climate system, in particular, the impact of abrupt climate changes on the biogeochemical cycles. Thomas Stocker has published over 110 papers in international refereed journals. He is a member of the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science. Stocker served as a Coordinating Lead Author and contributor for the Third Assessment Report of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published in 2001, and coordinates the Chapter "Global Climate Projection" in the forthcoming Fourth Assessment Report of IPCC. Stocker was awarded the National Latsis Prize of the Swiss National Science Foundation in 1993 and a honorary doctorate of the University of Versailles (France) in 2006. He is also Member of the Academia Europaea, and a Corresponding Member of the Academy of Science and Literature, Mainz.


The science of climate change - Speakers' biographies | Royal Society

royalsociety.org [cached]

Professor Thomas Stocker (Speaker)
Stocker Thomas Stocker is Professor of Climate and Environmental Physics at the University of Bern and head of the Division of Climate and Environmental Physics (staff of 50) of the Physics Institute since 1993. He obtained his PhD with distinction from ETH Zürich in 1987. After reserach positions at the University College (London), and McGill University (Montreal), he was appointed Associate Research Scientist at the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (New York) from 1991-1993. Stocker's main research interest is the development of climate models and the investigation of past and future climate change combining models and paleoclimatic reconstructions using ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica. He developed the first climate models of intermediate complexity and investigates the role of the carbon cycle in the climate system, in particular, the impact of abrupt climate changes on the biogeochemical cycles. Thomas Stocker has published over 110 papers in international refereed journals. He is a member of the Board of Reviewing Editors of Science. Stocker served as a Coordinating Lead Author and contributor for the Third Assessment Report of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published in 2001, and coordinates the Chapter "Global Climate Projection" in the forthcoming Fourth Assessment Report of IPCC. Stocker was awarded the National Latsis Prize of the Swiss National Science Foundation in 1993 and a honorary doctorate of the University of Versailles (France) in 2006. He is also Member of the Academia Europaea, and a Corresponding Member of the Academy of Science and Literature, Mainz.


Science/AAAS | Science Magazine: About the Journal: The Staff: Editorial Board

www.sciencemag.org [cached]

Thomas StockerUniversity of Bern


BNP Paribas Climate Initiative: Call for Projects | Future Earth

www.futureearth.org [cached]

Thomas Stocker, Professor and Head of the Climate and Environmental Physics department at the University of Bern


Understanding Sea Level Rise, p4: ice sheet dynamics and (13) melting feedbacks - a background to 21st century SLR acceleration | Bits of Science

www.bitsofscience.org [cached]

On the southern hemisphere the fluctuation is far less extreme - and could again show a seesaw phase difference, as suggested by Thomas Stocker of the University of Bern in Paleoceanography in 2003.


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